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How My Chemical Romance's 'I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love' Redefined Emo Music
My Chemical Romance in 2004. From left: Gerard Way, Ray Toro, Mikey Way, Frank Iero, Bob Bryar.

Photo: Naki/Redferns

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How My Chemical Romance's 'I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love' Redefined Emo Music

Released 20 years ago, My Chemical Romance's debut album brought a macabre, post-hardcore influence to emo music. Although the band didn't consider themselves emo, 'Bullets' profoundly influenced the genre.

GRAMMYs/Jul 22, 2022 - 06:36 pm

Two decades ago, GRAMMY–nominated rock band My Chemical Romance released their debut studio album, I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love. Now a hallmark of early aughts emo, MCR's first release was anything but a typical emo outing.

Released on indie label Eyeball Records on July 23, 2002 and produced by Thursday frontman Geoff Rickly, Bullets was unconventional in a number of ways. MCR's debut was raw and melodic, blending horror punk and post-hardcore with punk — a combination that, on the surface, was a step away from the emo stylings of contemporaries like Taking Back Sunday and the Used. Yet Bullets' popularity rocketed MCR to emo star status, redefining the genre along the way.

MCR would build on Bullets's headbanging mix of punk, pop, emo and post-hardcore on subsequent groundbreaking works Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge and The Black Parade. Yet the group’s debut — which was recorded over 12 days, less than three months after they formed — was released at an auspicious time in rock music. Popular nu-metal bands like Korn and Limp Bizkit were reaching their crescendo, leaving rock fans hungry for a different sound. They would find it in emo, short for "emotional hardcore" music.

The events that led to the band’s formation are, in part, responsible for their heartful message of "togetherness during trauma" — a throughline in their discography that originated on Bullets. After witnessing the September 11th attacks on the way to his Cartoon Network internship, future MCR frontman Gerard Way decided to use music to process the trauma and penned his first rock song, "Skylines and Turnstiles," which would become a standout track on Bullets.

"I was in Hoboken, which is right across the Hudson River," Way said in 2007. "There were 400 people and me. Right in front of us, those buildings went down. It was the biggest f—ing neutron bomb of mental anguish you’ve ever felt." 

Way retreated to his parents’ basement and recorded a barebones version of "Skylines," which he shared with high school friend Matt Pellisier. Pellisier saw potential in the track and agreed to play drums on a professional demo. To round out the lineup, they recruited guitarist Ray Toro — a mutual friend who was working toward becoming a film editor — and Gerard’s brother and future MCR bassist, Mikey, who coined the band’s name. (Mikey was inspired by an Irvine Welsh book called Ecstasy: Three Tales of Chemical Romance.)

The quartet’s demo captured the attention of indie label Eyeball Records, which offered the band a record deal and encouraged them to hit the studio as soon as possible. A couple of days before they were set to record Bullets, former Pencey Prep guitarist Frank Iero joined the MCR lineup but would only play on two tracks —"Honey, This Mirror Isn't Big Enough for the Two of Us" and "Early Sunsets Over Monroeville"— because of time constraints.

The melodic, post-hardcore album kicks off with a minute-long instrumental called "Romance" — a cover of a classical guitar piece "Romance Anónimo," perhaps nodding to a similar-sounding instrumental from the 1978 film, Dawn of the Dead, a favorite of the band. The breezy, bass-forward "Early Sunsets Over Monroeville," references the classic zombie flick and raises the question: If your lover becomes a zombie, will you take them out?   

Meanwhile "Honey, This Mirror Isn’t Big Enough for the Two of Us," a catchy, hard-rocking song about a breakup and substance use, and the frantic yet melodic "Vampires Will Never Hurt You," hint at the future of the band’s sound. Both songs, which are also featured on the band’s greatest hits album, May Death Never Stop You, would easily be at home on the group’s critically acclaimed sophomore effort, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge. The album’s closing track, "Demolition Lovers," is a fan favorite with heavy influence from Thursday which follows two lovers on the run (a la Natural Born Killers) who meet a tragic fate. 

While the album offers fans a glimpse into the band’s potential, tracks like "Drowning Lessons," "Cubicles," and "The Best Day Ever" are not quite as memorable as their standout counterparts. Alternatively, Bullets' purest post-hardcore offering, "Our Lady of Sorrows," is a sonic departure from the rest of the album’s sound; it’s aggressive, fast-paced and closes with a rare, ferocious metal scream from Way.   

First emerging in the '80s with bands like Embrace, Dag Nasty and the Rites of Spring, emo had just entered its third wave in 2002. Due to the timing of Bullets' release, the acts they toured with, and their growing popularity, MCR would be lifted up as emo figureheads. But the band’s music didn’t really align with many of the subgenre’s notable elements: emotive, angsty lyrics, gang vocals, as well as pop-influenced chord changes and song structure. 

Gerard Way didn't consider emo to be an accurate descriptor — or one that gave them much platform in their early years. "Emo bands were being booked while we were touring with Christian metal bands because no one would book us on tours," he said in 2007. "Unfortunately we get lumped in with [bands] that are considered emo and by default that starts to make us emo. All I can say is …put the records next to each other and listen to them and there’s actually no similarities."      

The frontman’s convictions are justifiable; MCR’s sound is a blend of horror pop, glam, punk and post-hardcore — more akin to AFI and the Misfits than Taking Back Sunday or Brand New. Unlike other bands with the emo label, My Chemical Romance’s lyrics don’t primarily focus on distress or self-loathing, but they are emotive. While they played up the horror aesthetic, MCR has always aimed to comfort fans and give them a sense of community. Bullets backs up Way’s stance.  

MCR and Bullets did indeed impact their community, influencing a slew of acts' sound and style. The band’s innovative visuals for "Helena" and "I’m Not Okay" paved the way for Panic at the Disco’s early high-concept, cabaret-inspired music videos. U.K. group Creeper are direct descendants of MCR, complete with theatrical performances, punk riffs and a horror-inspired aesthetic.

My Chemical Romance’s “records have stood the test of time, and that’s the magic,” says Creeper’s Will Gould. “That’s what so much music in this genre fails to do – it fails to last more than five years. Those My Chemical Romance records will last forever." 

Pop-punk band State Champs also cite MCR as an early influence. "They weren't just a rock band, they were a rock band that didn’t look ordinary," says lead guitarist Tyler Szalkowski. "They were a rock band that’s very comfortable being different, and that’s very inspiring to see them have so much success from just being themselves." 

While third wave emo ended in the late aughts, My Chemical Romance's horror-inspired aesthetic, theatricality, impassioned vocals and surging sound continues to resonate. MCR’s strong artistic vision continues to attract new fans (the band released their first song in eight years this May) while inspiring genre-spanning artists such as Sleeping With Sirens, Famous Last Words, Lil Peep, Post Malone, Yungblud, Twenty One Pilots, and more.

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Remembering When We Were Young: Avril Lavigne, Jimmy Eat World & More Bands Reflect On The Peak Of Emo & Hardcore Ahead Of Vegas Fest
(Back row, from left) Micah Carli of Hawthorne Heights, Travis Clark of We the Kings, Lucia de la Garza and Eloise Wong of the Linda Lindas (Front row, from left) Buddy Nielson of Senses Fail, JT Woodruff of Hawthorne Heights, Kellin Quinn of Sleeping With Sirens, Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World, Sean Foreman of 3OH!3

Photos: Tim Mosenfelder, Daniel Boczarski/Redferns, Steve Jennings/WireImage, Gary Miller/FilmMagic, Tim Mosenfelder,  Chiaki Nozu/WireImage, Martin Philbey/Redferns, Noel Vasquez/Getty

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Remembering When We Were Young: Avril Lavigne, Jimmy Eat World & More Bands Reflect On The Peak Of Emo & Hardcore Ahead Of Vegas Fest

When We Were Young Festival performers Bright Eyes, the All-American Rejects, Meet Me @ the Altar and others celebrate the special sounds of the 2000s and 2010s — and the acts they're most excited to see in Las Vegas.

GRAMMYs/Oct 21, 2022 - 08:08 pm

Written by Taylor Weatherby and Jessica Lipsky

If the average fan travels to Las Vegas to find themselves squarely in the moment — whether that be at the slots, a show, or an artist residency — one festival is aiming to be a blast from the past. Held Oct. 22, 23 and 29, the When We Were Young Festival is a nostalgia event for the ages (particularly, those in their late 20s to early 40s). The event features 64 of the biggest names in pop-punk, emo and hardcore from the early 2000s through 2010s, as well as a handful of contemporary acts who are continuing those movements today.

While there was no doubt a divide between subcultures and subgenres back in the day — just ask any scene kid, these journalists included — When We Were Young breaks down those barriers in favor of a smorgasbord of sound. Across five stages at the Las Vegas Fairgrounds, there will be pop-punk from Avril Lavigne, post-hardcore from AFI, straight-ahead punk rock from the Linda Lindas, and the highly anticipated return of emo rockers My Chemical Romance.

Almost as soon as When We Were Young was announced, social media exploded about the implausibility of such a massive lineup. Even still, tickets sold out immediately. Organizers responded to the demand (and fans' thoughts about who was missing from this year’s roster) by announcing a jam-packed lineup for 2023 — which, of course, is already sold out.

Ahead of the inaugural When We Were Young festival, GRAMMY.com asked some of its acts to look back on this unique time in music and share some of their favorite memories. While you’re reading, press play on GRAMMY.com's official When We Were Young Fest playlist on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, and Pandora. Playlist powered by GRAMMY U.

3OH!3

3OH!3 when we were young

Photo courtesy of the artists

Nathaniel Motte: I think the emo scene really encouraged a sense of demystification across a lot of different facets of music. We started touring on a national scale on Warped Tour, and on that tour, pretty much every band does a daily meet and greet, where fans can meet the bands in person and have a substantive, personal interaction with them. That was really important for us, as we always considered ourselves pretty regular people, just trying to rock a party and make it as fun as possible for a bunch of our friends in the crowd. 

Our first three years of full touring (2008, 2009, and 2010) was a delirious, crazy, exhausting and joyful blur. We were so ignorant to the pitfalls of the "industry" that we didn't know what we couldn't do, and therein, every opportunity to do something different was novel and exciting. Each one of those years I was deferring my acceptance to medical school at the University of Colorado, because the experiences we were getting and the fun we were having was way too much to turn away (shout out to CU Medical School for the patience and generosity!). 

Sean Foreman: Playing Warped Tour in New York and reaching out to Lil Jon — who drove out and joined us on stage for two songs — that was truly the WTF moment, since a lot of our early sound was inspired by him. 

I’m a fan of almost all these bands, but I will say I’m excited to see Pierce the Veil. Our first American tour, we shared a bus with them. They are extremely nice people and I love their new song "Pass the Nirvana" a lot. That’s inspiring to me to watch a band that has been around maybe longer than us continuing to grow. They also short circuited our bus with their hair straighteners, and to this day I like to give them crap about it. 

A Day To Remember — Neil Westfall, guitarist

A Day To Remember when we were youngv

Photo: James Hartley

To me, this time was all about finding out who I was and what I liked. I would go to every show that came to my part of Florida. I made almost all my lifetime friends from going to shows and being a part of the scene in Florida. ADTR made music that allowed us to fully express every influence, whether that made sense to others or not. It allowed us to play every genre of show and fit in enough to play, but stand out enough to be remembered. 

I remember being on tour with Parkway Drive, The Acacia Strain and Suicide Silence, and getting our mixes back from Adam Dutkiewicz for Homesick. We all listened to them on the PA at the venue in Melbourne. We were insanely happy with how everything was going, and DL from The Acacia Strain came up to us and said,"You guys are about to be the biggest band in the world." We all laughed and went on to play. While we may not be the biggest band in the world yet, we aren’t finished. 

I am a huge fan of Paramore. I think we may have played, like, three festivals together in the past, and they have absolutely crushed every time I have seen them play. I probably could talk about multiple songs on multiple albums, but the first song I heard was"Pressure" from the album All We Know Is Falling. I doubt I will ever get to see them play it, but it will always hold a special place in my heart. 

The All-American Rejects — Mike Kennerty, guitarist

all-american rejects

Photo courtesy of the artist

[This era] was the last gasp of the old music industry... MTV, radio, magazines. We got to live out those rollercoaster experiences right before things changed, which was amazing as kids who grew up in Oklahoma seeing all those things from afar. We've probably forgotten as much as we remember! But getting a VMA (back when videos still felt like a big deal) was pretty cool!

We found out about the lineup along with everyone else. To say they were vague about who all else was playing is an understatement. Alkaline Trio is still a great band and I'm excited to see them again! The first time we got to play with them was in the early '00s at this small club in Amsterdam. It felt like I was getting into a killer show for free.

Anberlin — Deon Rexroat, bassist

anberlin

Photo: Jordan Butcher

That first decade of the 2000s was very unique, because you still had this sort of monoculture coming out of the '90s that helped regional and local scenes to develop. Anberlin developed our sound by being a part of a local community of musicians in Central Florida. We started out playing shows with Copeland and Underoath. We weren't all the same genre, but it didn't matter. People nurtured our growth simply by going out to local shows and giving unknown bands like us a chance. 

Florida, at that time, was a special place, with bands like Hot Water Music, Dashboard Confessional, New Found Glory, and others really standing out musically and doing things that would go on to influence people across the country and the world. It was a great scene to be a part of.   

The time around our third album Cities, will always be a special time for me. We were coming off an incredible two years of growth after releasing Never Take Friendship Personal, and it felt like we were becoming a mature, respected band amongst our peers. We felt established and actually started headlining tours and selling out shows in larger venues. It was obvious something was really happening for us.  

I was and am stoked and honored about the invite to play [the fest], as I'm sure the other bands are. But I have to be honest — when we were first presented with the offer, I thought,"How is this real?" immediately followed by"How will they pull this off?!"

Sure, Warped Tour did it for years and on a daily basis, but so many bands are of a certain size or bigger here. The scheduling gymnastics are going to take Olympic-level talent. Regardless of all of that, I do know our set will just be a bonus next to spending multiple days with longtime best friends like Bayside and Story Of The Year, among many others!

Jimmy Eat World [is my favorite band on the bill]. Hands down. Having Clarity and Bleed American come out in the few years leading up to Anberlin's formation, they were, and still are, so influential for me. I think it speaks volumes that they are playing this fest, but are also such a major influence on so many of the other bands on the same bill. It's really hard to express what they mean to me personally, but also what they mean to the scene they helped to build that is at the core of the festival. 

Avril Lavigne

avril lavigne when we were young

Photo: Ryan McFadden

There have been songs I've loved by a lot of the bands playing. I love "Dirty Little Secret" by the All-American Rejects and "The Middle" by Jimmy Eat World — I'm really excited to see Jimmy Eat World. I still go back to their album Bleed American a lot. And I love the first album by The Used, which was done by my producer John Feldmann. 

This was a world I grew up not just a part of, but listening to. When I got asked to do [the festival] and found out who else was on it, I was like,"F— yeah, I'm in!" So many of my friends and favorite bands in one place — there's no way I couldn't be there. 

Black Veil Brides — Andy Biersack, singer

Black Veil Brides when we were young

Photo: Joshua Shultz

I'm a bit younger than a lot of my contemporaries from this era, so a lot of this period musically, for me, represents that "coming of age" sort of feeling. Being in 6th/7th grade and discovering bands like AFI, Alkaline Trio and Jimmy Eat World, and [then being] completely blown away that this thing called Warped Tour existed. I'd lay in bed some nights just thinking about how many days were left until next year's show in Cincinnati. It really means everything to me.

Alkaline Trio is and will always be my favorite band of all time. There is no single artist that has had the effect on me that they did and continue to do. I remember seeing them in Covington, Kentucky as a kid and waiting around back by the buses to see if I could get an autograph. [Guitarist] Matt [Skiba] signed my hoodie and I felt like I had won the lottery. I've been lucky enough to get to work with Matt a few times over the years. He's an amazing artist and person. I cannot wait to watch their set every day!

The basis for my songwriting and interest in pursuing that end of music really stems from this era more than any other. When we started touring and gaining popularity, I was still a teenager who had just dropped out of high school and was suddenly on this crazy ride, and sort of learning about life through the mechanism of the music industry and being on the road. I feel so lucky that we came up in the time and era that we did, and I think there's a reason why this type of music has continued on in popularity and adoration.

We have all been so excited for this [festival] for so long, and can't wait to play and enjoy the celebration of some of the best music that's ever been made.

Bright Eyes — Nate Walcott, keyboardist & trumpeter

bright eyes when we were young

Photo: Shawn Brackbill

My emo phase was a little earlier, in the '90s, when I was in high school. I'm old!

This was in Lincoln, Nebraska. Some friends of mine were really into bands like Mineral and Sunny Day Real Estate, and I liked some of that stuff; it was an appropriate soundtrack to my angsty high school teen years. But so were things like "Central Park West" (John Coltrane) and "Flamenco Sketches" (Miles Davis) and Chopin's preludes in Em and Db major, as well as "I Could Have Lied," perhaps the most emo of all Red Hot Chili Peppers songs. All of these things somehow had a similar feeling to me.

One of my best friends in high school, Ben Armstrong, played drums in Commander Venus —a band featuring my future Bright Eyes bandmate Conor Oberst…. It was fun riding around with Ben going to Commander Venus shows in houses and weird performance spaces and s—y all ages clubs.  To be a high school kid doing that stuff was exhilarating and…emotional!

I started playing in Bright Eyes in 2002, and became a full-time member in 2005. I can't speak entirely for all my bandmates   My Chem[ical Romance] most certainly came up from time to time but I wasn't listening to a lot of emo, hardcore or pop-punk once the aughts hit. But we were touring and recording constantly during this period.

I was pleasantly surprised by the degree to which the festival tapped into this sense of nostalgia, and how much it seemed to resonate with people. Any occasion for people to congregate and enjoy music in the spirit of celebration is something to be happy about, and we're glad to be a part of it. I'm looking forward to expanding my horizons and hearing some new things.  Maybe my biggest emo phase lies ahead!

Dance Gavin Dance — Matt Mingus, drummer

dance gavin dance when we were young

Photo: Lindsey Byrnes

This era of music was particularly very special to me. I started going to local pop punk/emo shows when I was 14. This progressed into me getting acquainted with the larger national acts in the scene. I always liked these shows because everyone there was very welcoming and I felt right at home.

I was lucky enough to grow up in Sacramento, California, which had awesome shows all of the time thanks to the legendary music venue called The Boardwalk. Thanks to seeing countless bands there over the years, myself and the other founding members were inspired to create Dance Gavin Dance.

One of my fondest memories of that era was when we got our first record deal and went to record our first full-length album, Downtown Battle Mountain, in Portland, Oregon in 2007. I had just turned 18 and was still a senior in high school. I was nervous but more so excited; little did I know this would jumpstart a life full of touring and writing music with some of my best friends in the world for the next 15 years and counting.

I was excited and honored [to be on the bill]. However, it made me feel a little old. To be put up on a pedestal with bands like My Chemical Romance and Paramore as a nostalgic artist, I must say, felt pretty good.

I'm super excited [to see] a lot of the bands on the festival [lineup] — one in particular is Dashboard Confessional. When I was in 8th grade, I did a music project on The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most; I used to be in love with that album when I was younger and still get all sorts of feelings when I listen to it to this day. I can't wait to finally see them perform!

​​Hawthorne Heights — J.T. Woodruff, singer

hawthorne heights when we were young

Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Standing on the main stage in Columbus, Ohio at Warped Tour 2005 — that was the moment that I realized our band and this genre was starting to get massive. It was an ocean of people from all walks of life, that were dressing like us, and wearing the same haircut as us. It felt great to belong to something. The roller coaster was in the free-fall stage, and we were hanging on for dear life, in the best way possible. I will remember that summer for the rest of my life.

For me, the most special moment was feeling a part of something different. We got to take part in a tidal wave, which changed the scene from almost exclusively pop-punk vs. hardcore to something that blended these worlds together. You could feel the sea change happening — similar to when the grunge movement happened when I was a kid. It wasn't something we were aware of at the moment, but as time grows, you start to realize the lasting impact the songs we created [have] had.  

We found out [about] the lineup when the fans did. And while it felt chaotic at the time, it was interesting to see how the internet reacted in real time. It was a masterclass in social marketing. These events are what makes the scene relevant after all these years. The fans need it. The bands need it. We all want to live forever.  

Universally, I think My Chemical Romance is a band that everyone believes in. We've been fortunate enough to hang out with them quite a few times, and they are genuine legends. A band that puts art first, and will sacrifice nothing to achieve the vision that is in their collective brain, is so rare and so pure. I took my daughter to watch them on their current arena tour. We loved every minute of it, and it was a great moment from a father to a daughter — elder emo to current emo. 

I Prevail — Steve Menoian, guitarist

i prevail when we were young

Photo: Fearless Records

I think it was a really creative time for rock and guitar-driven music. There were so many different subgenres that were coming together and building the foundation of the way we would look back on that era.

When you really think about it, it's weird to think that music as different as emo, hardcore, metal-core and pop-punk would eventually feel that they almost cohesively came from the same era. I think that's unique. When we look back on the '80s or '90s, it seems like one style really dominated, like hair metal or grunge. The 2000s [felt] unique in how eclectic it was. 

We had an awesome alt rock station in Detroit called 89x. I remember driving to high school in the mornings and hearing The Used, 30 Seconds to Mars, Fall Out Boy, Panic! [at the Disco], Paramore, Rise Against, Simple Plan — so many bands like that. I didn't really realize it at the time, but it was great exposure to the emo and alt rock that was brewing in that era.  

I went through a huge Dashboard [Confessional] phase in my early college years. I remember sitting in my dorm late at night and learning to play all those songs off of The Places You Come to Fear the Most —"Standard Lines," "Screaming Infidelities,""Saints and Sailors." All I had with me that first year was an acoustic, so I really immersed myself in that record.  

I don't think we initially appreciated just how big [this festival] was going to be. We knew it would be big, but it just went to another level. Seeing the initial reaction and how viral the announcement went really put it into perspective. There are so many iconic bands on the bill, and as a younger band who didn't really come from that era, we're just stoked to be here — and to add our style into the crazy melting pot that will no doubt make this one of the best festival experiences of the year. 

Jimmy Eat World — Jim Adkins, singer/guitarist 

jimmy eat world when we were young

Photo: Jimi Giannatti

When someone brings up "emo," I think of the beginnings of our band. About the 1994 to 2002 time period. That was also my 18 to 25, growing-up period. Well, I guess you never really stop growing up, but that was when things were new. That was pre-internet as we know it today. So there is nostalgia for me on a personal level of experiencing things for the first time, and the special nostalgia of knowing how I experienced it, that way, was the last time anyone will. 

I feel like the entire period is a core memory. To be involved at all in the scene meant to take on a work ethic of self-dependence. But you had to take on an equal amount of contribution. As motivated or self-contained as you may be, you weren't going anywhere without help. We were shown when we matched our appetite for adventure with the willingness to contribute, there were lifelong friends to be made. 

There was also a ceiling on how personal you should take any of this. It felt like no one outside of our group of friends actually cared. If you weren't in it for the sake of personal reward in creating music, then you were in the wrong place. It turns out everything we simply just did back then was exactly what you need to make playing music a long-term endeavor.  

There were a lot of thoughts I had when we were asked. Like I said, when I think about the beginnings of the band, there were not many people cheerleading. There was a dedicated, hardcore network of like-minded people around the country working together just to make it happen for the sake of it happening. To think what we were up to would be"seen" on the level it is today would have been insane. 

None of us got into playing music because it was cool. Or because we thought it could be a career. We did it because there was something inside telling us we had to. We put a lot into what we've done so far. Everything we have, really. And the festival coming around when it did to ask us feels like recognition in a way. A warm fuzzy blanket.

jxdn

jxdn when we  were young

Photo: Hunter Moreno

It felt almost funny that I was [on the same lineup] with all these legends. But f— that, this is the opportunity of a lifetime. So, I remember verbally saying, "I can't wait to show people that I'm not just supposed to be here, I am supposed to show people that this is just the beginning."

Silverstein and Taking Back Sunday are my meccas. I took so much inspiration from them, both vocally and energy-wise, for my first album, that I'm positive I will be bricked up watching them live for the first time.

[The early aughts] were the first nine years of my life, so honestly, I just lived. And it's really funny how now, more than 10 years later, I'm doing the same thing just with music. Living, and trying to stay as true to myself as I can.

The Linda Lindas

The Linda Lindas when we were young

Photo: Zen Sekiwaza

Lucia de la Garza, guitar & vocals: We were very, very young or maybe not even born when emo and hardcore and pop-punk were at their peaks. But it's so special how much fondness and joy you see when people talk about the music of their childhood. One of the reasons music is so cool is because it emulates emotions and conveys them so specifically. I know as I grow older, the music I'm listening to now will bring that same kind of feeling and nostalgia. And there are definitely some bands on the bill that I'll carry with me as I grow up.

I've been looking forward to seeing Wolf Alice, because I think their music is so cool and I love all their albums. It was playing a lot of the time when we had online school, and listening to it just makes me really happy.

Eloise Wong, bass & vocals: I read about Meet Me @ the Altar in Razorcake and look forward to checking them out live!

Mila de la Garza, drums & vocals: I had been wanting to play with Paramore, who are one of my favorite bands, for a long time, and this was just a real opportunity to do it. It's cool because we've known them for a while.

Bela Salazar, guitar & vocals: Zac [Farro, Paramore's drummer] took photos of us for press early this year. They've all come out to see us play, but this is the first time we get to play together! Paramore was my first real concert, and I can't believe we know them now and are playing the same fest!

Lucia de la Garza: [Playing When We Were Young] kind of felt like a challenge that we all wanted to accept….The energy is going to be so fun because it's about youth, and one of our vibes is youthful energy!

Mayday Parade — Jeremy Lenzo, bassist

Mayday Parade Press Photo

Photo: Jordan Kelsey Knight

I feel like this time period wasn't just special for emo/pop punk/hardcore, but really every subgenre. With music streaming just starting to take off, it seemed people were starting to stumble on new genres of music they didn't know existed.

I used to sit in computer class in high school with another classmate, and we would search the internet to see what new bands we could find. That's how I found a lot of my favorite bands. When Avril Lavigne started having radio hits, I think that opened a lot of peoples eyes to the pop rock/pop-punk genre, and ultimately made it more accessible for new people to get into the genre. 

There are so many memories I have where I can't remember the larger context of the memoir, but just have a small snapshot. Listening to Saves The Day in the car with my mom, and her saying she liked the melodies but couldn't stand the lyrics. Aimlessly driving at night with our guitarist, Alex, listening to Sparta just to listen to the whole record in one sitting. Being at my girlfriend's house when her roommate put on The Get Up Kids, which became one of my favorite bands of the time. I have tons of these little memories. It's funny how music can bring you back to a certain place in your life. 

Most of these bands we have toured with before and became good friends with, so I'm a fan of most of the artists playing. Some in particular that stand out are Taking Back Sunday (Tell All Your Friends) because we took a lot of inspiration from them in the beginning. The Used (The Used) is another artist I was really into. I remember when I first heard them, I was blown away by the songwriting and how good Bert's voice was. 

Also Jimmy Eat World (Clarity) always blew me away with their songwriting, and helped shape parts of our band as well. Oh, I almost forgot My Chemical Romance! I didn't really get into them until The Black Parade, but damn if that isn't a killer album. Honestly every time I finished writing a sentence, I remembered another album I like [from an] artist at the festival — this could go on for a while, so I'm just going to end it here.

Meet Me @ the Altar

Meet Me @ the Altar press photo

Photo: Jonathan Weiner

Edith Victoria, singer: [This music] gave me a community of people that were like me that I couldn't find anywhere else. I found music, went to shows, and met my best friends.

Téa Campbell, guitarist/bassist: [When we were asked to play WWWY], we were shaking in our boots! 

Ada Juarez, drummer: Literally all we were told was that My Chemical Romance was playing this festival and that's all we needed to know.

Campbell: But then we saw the full lineup when it was announced and we were like whaaaaaaaaaaaat!

Victoria: I'm excited to see Kittie because they're so iconic. And to be an all-girl band touring with Slipknot at that time?! Plus, they're fashion icons to me. 

Juarez: I have more than one [band I'm excited to see], but mainly Bring Me the Horizon. I've been following them for so long. Every album they put out gets better and better, but Sempiternal is one of my favorites. It's so influential to me and the scene in general. I feel they're one of those bands that made such a name for themselves. They can do so many genres and still nail it. It's so hard to find a band like that. 

Campbell: My favorite is Paramore. They're the reason I'm in this band. I think Brand New Eyes is my favorite album. My favorite memory is when I was 14 and I got to see them live in Florida. It made me realize that's what I wanted to do, too.

Nessa Barrett

Nessa Barrett press photo

Photo: P Mastro

That generation of music means so much to me. Avril [Lavigne], Blink [182], Paramore — music I grew up listening to and all have shaped who I am today musically. I even got the opportunity to work with Travis Barker on my song "la di die," and being in the studio with him really helped me understand myself as an artist even more. He is an icon of the generation within himself. It all feels so surreal to be a part of.

There are so many cool artists that are involved [in the fest], but if I had to pick a favorite, it would be Avril. She is just such an icon, and she paved the way for herself to have a long-lasting career. I think her first album came out the year I was born, so 20 years of Avril is insane.

Everyone was talking about [the festival when it was announced], so I knew what an amazing opportunity it was to be a part of it. I also love that this is the first time the festival is happening — honored to be [part of] the debut of it.

Pierce the Veil — Jaime Preciado, bassist

Pierce the Veil press photo

Photo: Fearless Records

It was a special period of time where certain artists and bands didn't have to confound themselves to the typical mainstream radio. It was a time when you could be an outcast and still be heard. It made the music we liked special, unique, and felt more like a smaller community we could connect to.

When Thrice put out the album The Illusion of Safety, that was the first album I heard that was everything I wanted to do in music. They paved the way for that. It was heavy, happy, sad — all the things you want in a record. It drew me into this style of music and helped me discover many other bands in the genre.

When I first listened to My Chemical Romance, it was the first time I ever felt the lyrics of another band and created a connection to the music as a whole. It is another band that paved the way for artists like us. I'm pretty sure I used their lyrics in my yearbook for my senior quote!

The amount of legends on this bill is unreal and I can't believe we get to share the stage with so many of them over the course of three shows.

Senses Fail — Buddy Nielsen, singer

Senses Fail press photo

Photo: Cameron Gile

When I really realized that what was happening was pretty significant was Warped Tour 2006. The shows were just massive almost every venue was completely full; it was at times impossible to make your way through the crowds. A lot of the bands we were friends with had to start bringing security in order to keep signings and basic operations safe.

I once skipped school to see [Thursday] play. I went by myself and just sort of lost my mind in the show, and it was one of the best experiences I have had in my life. Their album Full Collapse changed my life.

[This period of time] was my youth. Instead of going to college, I ended up in a band touring the world. My twenties were the boom of emo music, and along with that, our band.

All my old friends came out of the woodwork to ask for tickets [to When We Were Young]. I would definitely be making the trip to Vegas even if we weren't on the bill.

Silverstein — Shane Told, singer

Silverstein press photo

Photo: Wyatt Clough

It was amazing that we all came together, bands from all over, and really started an entire new music scene. I loved the punk rock scene — I still do — but this meant more. We weren't afraid to express ourselves and our emotions in the music. And that really resonated with the fans. It became about more than just the music and the energy. It dug deeper.

And at the same time the internet and social media was just starting out, so not only did we have our own exciting breed of music, we also had an entire movement on the internet talking about it, interacting with each other. That had never happened before on that scale.  

When we released Discovering The Waterfront in 2005, it just exploded overnight. It wasn't the radio or MTV, it was real fans sharing it on AIM and MSN, putting"My Heroine" on their MySpace profiles, and of course coming out to shows like Warped Tour and Taste of Chaos. People were illegally downloading the music all over the world where they couldn't buy a CD.  

We played in Mexico City — a place we had no distribution — and sold out the show, with the crowd singing every word. It was at that point I knew just how special what was happening with us — and the scene — was.

Armor For Sleep were one of our favorite new bands when we started touring. We would listen to their first album over and over and over in the van. Eventually we met them at Furnace Fest in 2003, and hit it off right away. We did tons of tours and they became close friends. I kept in touch with Ben [Jorgensen, Armor For Sleep's singer] over the years, and I'm so happy they're back at it! Can't wait to watch them.  

Sleeping With Sirens — Kellin Quinn, singer

Sleeping With Sirens press photo

Photo: Nick Stafford

Warped Tour definitely stands out [as a core memory from this time]! Watching my favorite bands as a kid play the festival, and then come full circle and be invited back as many times as we did. I'll remember those summers forever.

When you're in it, it's difficult to see it with perspective… I think all I can say is that "the scene" is just accessible enough without being your parents' music, ya know? We're truly humbled to be a part of this festival and to have helped shape the scene in whatever capacity. [Jimmy Eat World's] Bleed American was a huge album for me! Very excited to watch them play! I'll be singing every word.

State Champs — Ryan Scott Graham, bassist

State Champs press photo

Photo: Alex McDonell

When I found emo music, it was obviously at a very pivotal time in my life. I was an insecure kid in middle school looking for myself in a number of ways. I didn't know the first thing about this style of music until a friend invited me to a local show. On a whim, I went, and it changed everything for me. The weird, rejected kids like me became the cool kids on stage with guitars, singing about their confusion and angst.

The nostalgia of this scene takes me back to those years that I began to look so fondly upon. It became the career trajectory I followed because I wanted to write songs to make other people feel less alone. Despite some of the corniness that came along with those years of early pop-punk and emo, it is deeply emotional to me in a sort of salvation-like way.

So many artists I love and respect are playing this festival, but one I'm most excited to see is Dashboard Confessional. I've never seen Chris [Carrabba] play live after all these years listening and being a fan.

DC was and is so important to me personally as a songwriter. I remember sitting in the backseat on long drives listening to burnt CDs of Dashboard songs, just dissecting the lyrics and falling in love with the acoustic guitar. It's one of the reasons I started my career as an acoustic artist — Dashboard really showed me the beauty in the simplicity of just a guitar and a voice. The fact that his song arrangements were so interesting without massive production was inspiring and pushed me to start making songs of my own following that recipe. As long as he plays something from Swiss Army Romance, I'll be good!

My initial reaction to getting the offer to play was bliss! It's funny, because we've been doing State Champs for a long time and have had the opportunity to do a lot of really cool things — travel the world, [play] main stages at big festivals, support arena bands, etc. But WWWY Fest, for whatever reason, encouraged a lot of people that I went to middle and high school with — and haven't talked to in ages — to reach out and say,"Holy s—! I can't believe you guys are playing with Paramore, that's so cool!"

I'm like,"Out of everything we've been doing for the last 8-10 years, this is the first time you've taken notice?" In a way it's encouraging, because it feels like we're still breaking new ground as a band. I couldn't be more stoked!

Story of the Year — Ryan Phillips, guitarist

Story of the Year press photo

Photo: Ryan Phillips

This was a very important time for us, because we played an undeniable role in bringing "screamo" to the mainstream. We were one of the first of a small number of bands in the genre that had a platinum record and legitimate success on mainstream radio. The scene was exploding, and we were right there, bringing it to the masses.

2002 is a year that completely changed the trajectory of my life. Everyone in the band grew up in St. Louis, all products of working-class families, all playing in bands together, and laying the foundations of what would become Story of the Year. That year, we left everything and everyone we knew, and moved to Southern California to be closer to the music industry and chase teenage dreams of record deals and touring the world. We had no money, and knew like three people in CA, but our band was our life. 

That move (and year) is actually one of my fondest memories, because we were so hungry, but also incredibly unaware to the point of total naivety. But, there can be immense power in being young and not knowing s—. If we would have known that the odds of leaving your mom's basement, moving to CA with no money, and getting a major-label record deal and a platinum record were about 1 in 10 million, we would have never left. I would be a fireman or something. 

You get older and stop taking shots, because you are too aware of the odds of failure. You have perspective, less willing to risk. In 2002, we were innocent, but total savages, and no force of nature could have stopped us. It didn't even occur to us that we could fail. We were that driven, and, yes, that naive. Somehow it worked out! 

Glassjaw was and is one of my favorite bands of all time. I remember doing Warped Tour with them, and it was part of my daily routine to go watch their set. I feel like half of the bands playing Warped would go watch their set. They were that band. They set the bar for honest, hyper-credible music with understated musicianship — in my mind, anyway. 

I completely understood why so many people initially thought [this festival] was fake. Seeing the promo for it was like looking at my entire CD book in 2006! Literally every band from the genre. Of course we were flattered, and supremely stoked to be on a bill with so many of our friends. Unreal!

The Used — Bert McCracken, singer

The Used press photo

Photo: Anthony Tran

The bands around that time wrote in a different way than before, bands in the '90s. I think the reason why it's called emo is because it was so close to the heart and from personal experience. That's what made it so special.

It was just an exciting time. There were lots of bands coming up. Lots of really cool experiences, lots of opportunities for bands — the Warped Tour was still huge.

Our record had just come out, and we were playing on the small Volcom stage at Warped Tour. All the power went out during "The Taste of Ink," and the whole crowd sang it a cappella. We were all like, "Holy s—. Something's happening." They immediately moved us to the main stage, which was pretty crazy.

Clarity from Jimmy Eat World was really a big [album] for me growing up. It kind of introduced me to a different side of this post-hardcore that I was into. I loved the early-on emo bands, Texas Is The Reason, Casket Lottery — a lot of those bands that are kind of obscure and nobody's heard of them, but they really started this whole scene. And Jimmy Eat World was around during that time, just they were just a lot more melodic and melodically friendly. It was really, really cool to hear that.

Black Sails in the Sunset by AFI was also really special to me. I have a picture of me and Davey Havok from when I was like 14. They were playing with Good Riddance, and I waited after the show to meet him and got a picture. And then on Warped Tour, I went up to him, under his little umbrella, and I was like, "Hey, check this out, a picture of me and you like 15 years ago." He thought it was awesome. He's a nice guy.

This is all the big bands from that time. [On] Warped Tour, you'd maybe have one or two, but this is a serious ordeal. We're more than excited to be part of the early emo scene. We're so grateful, and we're so lucky to still be doing this 22 years later.

We're all older and a little more fragile. But it's still a thrashing emo show. I'm ready for it.

We The Kings — Travis Clark, singer/guitarist

We the Kings press photo

Photo: Lee Cherry

I was a freshman in high school when this era was really starting to hit. I used to sneak into Warped Tour, because I couldn't afford a ticket, and watch as many bands as I could. There are probably only a handful of bands that I haven't seen play, and even less that we haven't done a show with.

I feel lucky just being a kid in that musical era, because it was really the one thing that made me feel like I was part of something. Ultimately, it led to me starting We The Kings.

Our first record was released on Oct. 2nd, 2007, and that week we were taking our song "Check Yes Juliet" to Top 40 radio. It ended up charting and playing on every radio station in the country. Hearing it on the radio for the first time is something that I will never forget. 

I was at the beach in my hometown, Anna Maria Island, [Florida,] and as I started my Jeep, I heard, "Check yes Juliet, are you with me, rain is falling down on the sidewalk…" I remember thinking that it was weird, because I didn't have our CD in the CD player. After about 20 seconds, I realized that it was playing on the biggest radio station in Florida and I lost my mind. The song ended up taking off and selling around 2 million singles worldwide. That to me will always seem crazy, and for us, it really was the biggest thing that put us on the musical map.

I thought [this festival] was fake. As I was reading the artist lineup, I just kept thinking, No way. Nope. Absolutely no way this is real. There are just so many amazing bands playing on the same day. This is literally going to go down as the greatest musical festival ever — and in my opinion, I'm not exaggerating. We feel really grateful to have been invited. 

There are too many bands on the lineup that I have seen before and have a memory of, but if I had to choose one, it would be Jimmy Eat World. They were one of the very first bands that I saw in concert. At the time they were opening for Blink-182 and Green Day (such a crazy lineup!). As soon as Jimmy Eat World played their first note, I was absolutely hooked. For 40 minutes I saw them absolutely shred their set. I went home after seeing that concert and started We The Kings. 

Fast forward a few years, I met Jim Atkins at the Bamboozle Festival we were both playing and I was introduced to him by our mutual publicist. I got the chance to tell him that his band was the reason that I started WTK. The coolest thing was right after I said that, he goes, "Oh that's awesome, I really like that 'Juliet' song, it's super catchy." I basically died in that moment.

I was so inspired by the festival that I went into the studio a few weeks after we received our invite and I wrote a song called "When We Were Young" with the same nostalgic sound that We The Kings is known for. We've been asked to play just about every festival in the world and I have never done that before, so am I excited? The answer "YES" is an incredible understatement.

Why 2002 Was The Year That Made Pop-Punk: Simple Plan, Good Charlotte & More On How "Messing Around And Being Ourselves" Became Mainstream

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The Week In Music: Music's Female Fireworks

Katy Perry, Rihanna and Taylor Swift among Maxim's Hot 100

GRAMMYs/Dec 3, 2014 - 05:06 am

Do you know who is No. 1 on the Hot 100? According to Maxim magazine's list of Hot 100 women of 2011, it's model/actress Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, who will appear in the upcoming Transformers 3 film. Though they didn't hit the top spot, several women of music made the hot list, including Katy Perry (No. 3), Taylor Swift (No. 20), Rihanna (No. 22), Britney Spears (No. 25), and Lea Michele (No. 28), among others. While the list is typically meant to appeal to men, at least one woman has weighed in on her fave. Adele told the UK's The Sun, "If Rihanna wanted me, I'd do it with her. She's hot." It seems Adele's infatuation began when Rihanna stripped off a pair of pants on "The X Factor" last year. We didn't know it was someone like Rihanna that Adele was looking for.

Quite possibly the most interesting man in the world (or at least in the world of reality television), Ryan Seacrest is setting out on yet another entertainment venture. The "American Idol" host and radio personality on KIIS-FM in Los Angeles is in talks with NBC to create a new music-themed program. Details on what the show will entail are still being developed, but according to reports it will likely not be a traditional singing competition and will not cast Seacrest on camera. But Seacrest could put on his producer's hat again for the show, a role he has assumed for shows such as "Keeping Up With The Kardashians." Will the show come to fruition and will Seacrest maintain his superhuman powers of being in more than 100 places at once? The jury will likely remain out, at least until the pilot is shot.

Marie Osmond has tied a familiar knot, while rekindling hope for estranged couples everywhere. In a romantic turnabout, Osmond remarried her first husband, Stephen Craig, during a private ceremony in a Mormon temple in Las Vegas on May 4. "I am so happy and look forward to sharing my life with Stephen," said Osmond. The couple shared lives previously when they were first married in 1982, but they divorced just three years later. Osmond married her second husband, Brian Blosil, in 1986 and shared more than 20 years with him before divorcing in 2007. Will the third time be the proverbial charm for Marie? In related news, everyone's favorite brother-sister combo released a new album this week, aptly titled Donny & Marie. The set has a country flavor (which is good for Marie, who has always been a little bit country, though we don't know where that leaves Donny's little bit of rock and roll). One of the tracks on the album, "We Will Find A Way," contains the lyrics: "Sun follows rain/Strength follows pain/Ohhh, we will find a way." Hmmm…sounds like an appropriate song for a divorced couple who has rediscovered their love.

Music fans looking for not only a concert, but also the opportunity to chow down with the band are in luck. Kingsford charcoal has partnered with the GRAMMY-winning Zac Brown Band to sponsor "eat-and-greets" at select concerts this summer. While Kingsford has brokered similar deals with artists such as Tim McGraw and Keith Urban in the past, this particular partnership is arguably more appropriate given leader Zac Brown's renowned culinary skills, cookbook and line of Southern Ground gourmet products. Fans attending the pre-show gatherings will have the opportunity to sample Brown's Southern recipes while also sampling performances from artists signed to Brown's label, Southern Ground Records. Some fans will even have the opportunity to have a feast with the Zac Brown Band themselves. Looking to get your grub on with Zac and Co.? Click here for more information.

In other list news, looks like any of the following could have afforded their own royal wedding. Former "American Idol" judge Simon Cowell was the big mover on the ranking of the UK's wealthiest music people. Jumping from 11th last year to No. 6, Cowell's fortune was valued at about $330 million. The top 5 includes Zomba Records founder turned philanthropist Clive Calder (No. 1, $2.1 billion), composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (No. 2, $1.11 billion), musical theater producer Cameron Mackintosh (No. 3, $1.10 billion), ex-Beatle Sir Paul McCartney (No. 4, $810 million), and "Idol" franchise creator Simon Fuller (No. 5, $614 million). Yep, Britain's got talent.

It seems radio and TV pundit Glenn Beck is digging ever deeper for his alarmist conspiracy theories. The man who had become the latter-day Dr. Gene Scott — at least until his Fox News TV show was recently cancelled — Beck is now taking on one of the great political powers of our age: a rock and roll band. According to the Guardian, Beck cited an episode of "Glee" that featured the My Chemical Romance song "Sing," claiming the song was propaganda. Maybe it's just us at TWIM, but after having viewed the Beck segment, we're not sure what exactly he's talking about. Apparently, My Chemical Romance singer Gerard Way was a bit befuddled too. Said Way via his band's website: "I think the word Glenn Beck was looking for was 'subversion' not 'propaganda,' because I don't know what it would be considered propaganda for — truth? Sentiment?" Well, if nothing else is clear, it turns out Beck is a fan of the "brilliant" "Glee."

Katy Perry's "E.T." featuring Kanye West remains at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and Adele's "Rolling In The Deep" is tops on the iTunes singles chart.

Any news we've missed? Comment below.

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Last Week In Music

My Chemical Romance To Headline Chicago's Riot Fest 2020

My Chemical Romance 

Photo: Andrew Benge/Redferns via Getty Images

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My Chemical Romance To Headline Chicago's Riot Fest 2020

After their Los Angeles comeback, the emo rock band will perform together for the second time in years

GRAMMYs/Jan 30, 2020 - 02:58 am

The recently reunited My Chemical Romance have been announced as the headliner of Chicago's Riot Fest. 

So far, the "Welcome To The Black Parade" band are the only act announced. The rock and hip-hop fest will take place Sept.11–13 at Douglas Park.

The band reunited Dec. 20 at the Shrine Expo Hall in Los Angeles after disbanding in 2013. Since then, fans had been wondering if they would hit the stage again. 

"We're tired of you asking, so we're bringing My Chemical Romance to Riot Fest," the fest announced on social media.

The rest of the lineup will be revealed in the spring. Early-bird presale tickets are on sale now.

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My Chemical Romance, Run The Jewels, Pixies & Smashing Pumpkins To Headline Riot Fest 2021

My Chemical Romance in 2012

Photo: Chris Hyde/Getty Images

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My Chemical Romance, Run The Jewels, Pixies & Smashing Pumpkins To Headline Riot Fest 2021

The Chicago alt, punk, rock, rap and more festival returns to Douglas Park Sept. 17-19, 2021, with Coheed and Cambria, Taking Back Sunday, Lupe Fiasco, FEVER 333, K.Flay and more joining the first wave lineup

GRAMMYs/Jun 17, 2020 - 11:42 pm

Yesterday, June 16, Riot Fest revealed the explosive first wave lineup for the next edition of their festival, now scheduled for 2021. My Chemical Romance, Run The Jewels, the Pixies and the Smashing Pumpkins will headline, with Sublime with Rome, Big Freedia, FEVER 333, K.Flay and many more also joining the initial billing.

The Chicago alt, rock, emo, punk, rap and more fest will return to Douglas Park on Sept. 17-19, 2021. The lineup announcement comes with the news the 2020 edition has been officially canceled due to COVID-19—ticket holders can request a refund or use their ticket in 2021.

Read: Sublime With Rome Talk Latest Album 'Blessings,' 10 Year Anniversary & Rocking Out With Post Malone

Riot Fest 2021 is dedicated to making emo kids' dreams come true—in addition to the My Chemical Romance reunion set, Taking Back Sunday, Coheed and Cambria, New Found Glory, All-American Rejects, Simple Plan and Saves The Day will also play.

Chicago's own alt hip-hop hero Lupe Fiasco will perform his 2007 GRAMMY-nominated album, The Cool, in its entirety. Vic Mensa, Meg Myers, Toots and the Maytals, Best Coast and Alex G also bring sonic diversity to the stacked lineup.

The festival organizers also announced the addition of the first-ever Thursday Preview Party, featuring "mystery bands (including one who will only play Thursday), early access to merch, and an assortment of carnival rides and food to enjoy," according to the press release.

Related: Saves The Day's Chris Conley Talks 20 Years Of 'Through Being Cool'

The Thursday party is a special benefit for fans who commit to the fest in the next 30 days, either with the purchase of 2021 tickets or 2020 ticketholders who hold the passes for 2021. Alternatively, 2020 ticketholders who want a refund or want to transfer their pass to a friend have 30 days to do; more info here.

Weekend passes for Riot Fest 2021 are currently on sale for $150. Ticketing info and the complete wave one lineup can be found on their website.

Today, My Chemical Romance, who was the only act previously announced to headline the 2020 fest, announced new 2021 dates for the North American leg of their reunion tour, which was set to take place this year. The emo vets played together for the first time in seven years in Los Angeles in December 2019, for a four-night run of sold-out shows.

Run The Jewels Are Ready To Pierce Your Heart Again