meta-script2025 GRAMMYs To Take Place Sunday, Feb. 2, Live In Los Angeles; GRAMMY Awards Nominations To Be Announced Friday, Nov. 8, 2024 | GRAMMY.com
The 2025 GRAMMYs take place Sunday, Feb. 2, at Crypto.com Arena in Los Angeles. Nominations for the 2025 GRAMMYs will be announced Friday, Nov. 8, 2024.

Graphic Courtesy of the Recording Academy

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2025 GRAMMYs To Take Place Sunday, Feb. 2, Live In Los Angeles; GRAMMY Awards Nominations To Be Announced Friday, Nov. 8, 2024

The 2025 GRAMMYs return to Los Angeles on Sunday, Feb. 2. Nominations for the 2025 GRAMMYs will be announced Friday, Nov. 8. Learn more about the key dates and deadlines ahead of Music's Biggest Night.

GRAMMYs/May 21, 2024 - 12:59 pm

Music's Biggest Night is back! The 2025 GRAMMYs will take place Sunday, Feb. 2, live at Crypto.com Arena in Los Angeles, the Recording Academy announced today. The 2025 GRAMMYs will broadcast live on the CBS Television Network and stream live and on demand on Paramount+. As well, nominations for the 2025 GRAMMYs will be announced Friday, Nov. 8, 2024. See the full list of key dates and deadlines for the 2025 GRAMMYs, officially known as the 67th Annual GRAMMY Awards, below.

Key dates for the 2025 GRAMMY Awards season are as follows:

Sept. 16, 2023 – Aug. 30, 2024
Product Eligibility Period
The period by which recordings are submitted for GRAMMY consideration. All releases must be available for sale, via general distribution, to the public by this date and through at least the date of the current year’s voting deadline (final ballot) to be eligible for the 2025 GRAMMY Awards.

July 8, 2024 – Aug. 23, 2024
Media Company Registration Period
Media companies must apply for registration with the Recording Academy to submit recordings.

July 17, 2024 – Aug. 30, 2024
Online Entry Period
All eligible recordings must be entered prior to the close of the Online Entry Period, regardless of the public release date.

Oct. 4, 2024 – Oct. 15, 2024
First Round Voting
First Round Voting determines all the GRAMMY nominees for each GRAMMY Awards year.

Nov. 8, 2024
Nominees Announced for the 2025 GRAMMY Awards
Announcing the official nominees list for the 2025 GRAMMYs.

Dec. 12, 2024 – Jan. 3, 2025
Final Round Voting
Determines the GRAMMY winners across all categories revealed on GRAMMY night.

Feb. 2, 2025
2025 GRAMMY Awards
Music's Biggest Night, recognizing excellence in the recording arts and sciences.

This February, the 2024 GRAMMYs proved to be an epic, history-making night. Women dominated the 2024 GRAMMYs: For the second time in four years, women won in the majority of the General Field Categories, winning Album Of The Year (Taylor Swift), Song Of The Year (Billie Eilish), Record Of The Year (Miley Cyrus), and Best New Artist (Victoria Monét). Elsewhere, Taylor Swift broke the all-time record for most GRAMMY wins in the Album Of The Year Category after winning for Midnights. Tyla won the first-ever GRAMMY Award for Best African Music Performance, one of three new GRAMMY Categories that debuted this year.

The 2024 GRAMMYs also celebrated the return of music legends, including Tracy Chapman, Joni Mitchell and Celine Dion, and ushered in new music icons-in-the-making like Victoria Monét, Samara Joy and Tyla. Relive some of the must-see moments and memorable, heartwarming acceptance speeches from the 2024 GRAMMYs. And rewatch all of the performances and key highlights from the 2024 GRAMMYs all year long on Live.GRAMMY.com.

Learn more about the upcoming 2025 GRAMMY Awards season and the annual GRAMMY Awards process.

GRAMMY News, Performances & Highlights

Photo of a gold GRAMMY trophy against a black background with white lights.
GRAMMY Award statue

Photo: Jathan Campbell

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GRAMMY Awards Updates For The 2025 GRAMMYs: Here's Everything You Need To Know About GRAMMY Awards Categories Changes & Eligibility Guidelines

Key updates to the 2025 GRAMMY Awards season include adjustments to eligibility criteria, Category renaming, and submission guidelines updates for some Categories, including the Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical Category.

GRAMMYs/Jun 14, 2024 - 01:53 pm

The Recording Academy, the organization behind the annual GRAMMY Awards, is sharing a series of updates to the annual GRAMMY Awards process for the 2025 GRAMMYs, officially known as the 67th GRAMMY Awards, which take place Sunday, Feb. 2, live at Crypto.com Arena in Los Angeles.

Key updates to the 2025 GRAMMY Awards season include adjustments to eligibility criteria, Category renaming, and submission guidelines updates for some Categories, including the Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical Category. All updates go into effect immediately at the 2025 GRAMMYs.

The 2024 amendments were voted on and passed at the Recording Academy's semiannual Board of Trustees meeting. These changes, designed to enhance the integrity and inclusivity of the awards, reflect the Academy's commitment to staying current with the evolving music industry.

Read more: 2025 GRAMMYs To Take Place Sunday, Feb. 2, Live In Los Angeles; GRAMMY Awards Nominations To Be Announced Friday, Nov. 8, 2024

The Recording Academy accepts proposals for changes to the GRAMMY Awards process from members of the music community year-round. The Awards & Nominations Committee, composed of Recording Academy Voting Members from diverse genres and backgrounds, meets annually to review proposals to update Awards Categories, procedures and eligibility guidelines.

For more information about the 2025 GRAMMY Awards season, learn more about the annual GRAMMY Awards process, read our FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) section, view the official GRAMMY Awards Rules and Guidelines, and visit the GRAMMY Award Update Center for a list of real-time changes to the GRAMMY Awards process.

Read the updates and amendments for the 2025 GRAMMYs in full below:

Eligibility, Criteria & Submission Guidelines Amendments:

  • All eligibly-credited Featured Artists with under 50% playtime will now be awarded a Winners' Certificate for all genre album Categories. (Note: Does not apply to Best Musical Theater Album, the General Field or Craft Categories.)

  • In the Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical Category, the following submission guidelines were amended, allowing for wider representation of the songwriter community:

    • The minimum submission threshold in which a songwriter is credited as a songwriter or co-writer (not a primary or featured artist or producer) was reduced from five to four songs.

    • The additional number of songs a songwriter may enter in which they are also credited as a primary or featured artist, or any other supporting role, increased from four to five.

  • The Best Traditional R&B Performance Category criteria was amended to more accurately represent recordings that embody the classic elements of R&B/soul music, distinguishing them from contemporary interpretations of the genre.

  • The Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album Category criteria was amended to expand the Category by broadening its scope and welcoming more entries from the Musical Theater community. Additionally, album eligibility criteria was updated to require that albums in this Category must contain more than 75% of newly recorded (previously unreleased) performances.

  • The Best Children's Music Album Category criteria was amended to include a requirement that lyrics and English-language translations must be included with entry submissions. Additionally, an intended audience age range for this Category was defined as infant to 12 years old.

GRAMMY Award Category Adjustments:

  • The Best Remixed Recording Category has moved from the Production, Engineering, Composition & Arrangement Field into the Pop & Dance/Electronic Field.

  • The Category formerly known as Best Pop Dance Recording has been renamed Best Dance Pop Recording.

  • The Best Dance/Electronic Music Album Category was renamed to Best Dance/Electronic Album, and the Category criteria was amended to establish that albums must be made up of at least 50% Dance/Electronic recordings to qualify.

  • Conjunto music will now be recognized in the Best Regional Roots Music Album Category, rather than the Best Música Mexicana Album (Including Tejano) Category.

  • The Best Score Soundtrack for Video Games and Other Interactive Media Category was amended to include a qualification for released material, specifically new DLC (downloaded content in-game) and Seasonal Expansions. The updated qualification establishes that greater than 50% of the music on an otherwise eligible Video Game Soundtrack or Interactive Media Soundtrack must be derived from new episodes or new programming released during the GRAMMY eligibility year for which it is entered.

GRAMMY News, Performances & Highlights

Photo of the Music Educator Award trophy
Music Educator Award

Photo Courtesy of the Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum

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215 Quarterfinalists Announced For The 2025 Music Educator Award

GRAMMYs/May 8, 2024 - 01:10 pm

Today, the Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum announced a total of 215 music teachers as quarterfinalists for the 2025 Music Educator Award. This prestigious award is given to current educators—from kindergarten through college in both public and private schools—who have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education and who advocate for the ongoing inclusion of music education in schools. This year’s quarterfinalists hail from 202 cities and were chosen from more than 2,400 initial nominations. Additionally, 159 legacy applicants from 2024 are also eligible for this year’s award.

Semi-finalists for the 2025 Music Educator Award will be announced later this year. The ultimate recipient will be celebrated during GRAMMY Week 2025.

A collaborative effort between the Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum, the Music Educator Award invites nominations from students, parents, friends, colleagues, community members, school deans, and administrators. Teachers may also nominate themselves, and those nominated are invited to complete a more detailed application.

Each year, one recipient is selected from among 10 finalists and recognized for their profound impact on students' lives. The 11th annual honoree will be flown to Los Angeles to attend the 67th GRAMMY Awards and participate in various GRAMMY Week events. The nine other finalists will receive a $1,000 honorarium, and the schools of all 10 finalists will receive matching grants. Additionally, fifteen semi-finalists will be awarded a $500 honorarium with matching school grants.

Read More: 8 Artists Who Were Inspired By Their Teachers: Rihanna, Adele, Jay-Z & More

The Music Educator Award program, including the honorariums and matching school grants, is supported by the Chuck Lorre Family Foundation this year. Additional backing comes from the American Choral Directors Association, National Association for Music Education, NAMM Foundation, and National Education Association, which support the program through outreach to their members.

Learn more about the Music Educator Award and see the full list of the 2025 Music Educator Award quarterfinalists and legacy applicants below:

QUARTERFINALISTS

Name School City State
Bryant Adler   Alcoa Elementary School Alcoa Tennessee
Patrick Aguayo   Rolling Hills Middle School Los Gatos California
Chrsitopher Alberts   School Without Walls Washington  Washington, D.C.
Bobi-Jean Alexander   Seneca Valley Senior High School Harmony  Pennsylvania
Erin Althen   Westhill High School Syracuse New York
Kathleen Amabile   Elk Lake Junior-Senior High School Springville Pennsylvania
Michael Antmann   Freedom High School Orlando Florida
Amanda Babcock   Merrimack Valley Middle School Penacook New Hampshire
Eric Bable   Crestview High School Columbiana Ohio
Natalie Baker   Missoula International School Missoula Montana
Jean-Paul Balmat   Mission Bay High School San Diego California
Russell Balusek   Edna High School Edna Texas
Lee Anne Barnes   Thomas Street Elementary School Tupelo Mississippi
Makynzie Barton   Elkton High School Elkton Maryland
Andrew Beasley   Pearl High School Pearl Mississippi
Daniel Beilman   Oak Park School Sarasota Florida
Andrew Bennett   Fredonia High School Fredonia New York
David Billingsley   DeLaSalle High School Minneapolis Minnesota
Stephen Blanco   Las Vegas High School Las Vegas Nevada
Mike Bogle   Dallas College Cedar Valley Campus Dallas Texas
Sarah Boline   Johns Hill Magnet School Decatur Illinois
Cherie Bowe   Pascagoula High School Pascagoula Mississippi
Nathan Bowman   Southeast Middle School Salisbury North Carolina
Tamiko Bridges   Laurel High School Laurel Mississippi
Justin Britt   Kingston Public Schools Kingston Oklahoma
Korey Bruno   Westfield High School Westfield Massachusetts
Richard Butler   Jack Britt High School Fayetteville North Carolina
Jason Canfield   Prescott High School  Prescott  Wisconsin
Clayton Capello   Pettus ISD  Pettus Texas
Dr. John Carlisle   Hannan JSHS Ashton West Virginia
Taylor Cash   Albertville High School Albertville Alabama
Barry Chesky   Dulaney High School Timonium Maryland
Ethan Chessin   Camas High School Camas Washington
Ernesta Chicklowski   Roosevelt Elementary School Tampa Florida
Donna Clark   Miguel Juarez Middle School Waukegan Illinois
Jeremy Cole   Southern Middle School Somerset Kentucky
James Cooney   Mayville High School Mayville, WI Wisconsin
Paul Corn   Susan E. Wagner High School Staten Island New York
Kevin Croxton   Oliver Springs Elementary School Van Buren Arkansas
Brandon Czubachowski   Spring Valley Hall High School Spring Valley Illinois
Mike D'Errico   Albright College Reading Pennsylvania
Nicole Davidson   Susan E. Wiley Elementary School Copiague New York
Andy Davis   Reavis High School Burbank Illinois
Kelly DeHaan   Mountain Ridge High School Herriman Utah
David Dehnet   Oral Roberts University Tulsa Oklahoma
Joe DeLisi   Chisago Lakes High School  Lindstrom  Minnesota
Jesse Dooley   Millbury Jr./Sr. High School Millbury Massachusetts
Lawrence Dubill   Hamburg High School Hamburg New York
Bridget Duffy-Ulrich   Oshkosh North High School Oshkosh Wisconsin
Jared Duncan   DeKalb School of the Arts Avondale Estates Georgia
Nicole Durkin   Argo Community High School Summit  Illinois
Kaley Eaton   Cornish College of the Arts Seattle Washington
Cindy Ellis   Miami Arts Studio 6-12 at Zelda Glazer Miami Florida
Clerida Eltime   WHIN Music Community Charter School New York New York
Grady Emmert   Lake Buena Vista High School Orlando Florida
Gerardo Escobar   Riverside Middle School El Paso Texas
Regan Eudy   Central Elementary School Albemarle North Carolina
Kevin Fallon   C.W. Worthington Middle School Haslet Texas
Jason Falvo   Waynesburg Central Elementary Waynesburg Pennsylvania
Mike Fedyszyn   Riverview Middle School Plymouth Wisconsin
Daniel Ferreira   Klein Intermediate School Houston Texas
Jill Fetty   Clear Falls High School League City Texas
Joe Finnegan   DC Everest Senior High School Weston Wisconsin
Joseph Flores   Mesa Middle School Roswell New Mexico
Jasmine Fripp   KIPP Nashville Collegiate High School Nashville  Tennessee
Sarah Fulton   Kings Mountain High School Kings Mountain  North Carolina
Stefanie Gardner   Glendale Community College Glendale Arizona
Ryan Geary   Sanford High School Sanford Maine
Emily Golden   East Burke High School Connelly Springs North Carolina
Rob Goldman   Westwood High School Westwood Massachusetts
Alex Grimm   F.J. Reitz High School Evansville Indiana
Melanie Gunn   Whitman Middle School Seattle Washington
Daniel Gutierrez   Nixa High School Nixa  Missouri
Holly Haffner   Grissom Middle School Sterling Heights Michigan
Michael Hamann   West Ottawa High School Holland Michigan
Tony Aaron Hambrick   Jessye Norman School of the Arts Augusta Georgia
Cordara Harper   Grambling State University  Grambling Louisiana
Vernon Harris   Pulaski Heights Middle School Little Rock Arkansas
Sarah Hart   Islander Middle School Mercer Island Washington
Kellie Harvey   Fruitland Primary School Fruitland Maryland
Toby Harwell   Wiseburn Middle School Hawthorne California
Rachael Heffner   Brookhaven Innovation Academy Norcross Georgia
Bobby Helms   Copiah-Lincoln Community College Wesson Mississippi
Bernie Hendricks, Jr.   Ocoee High School  Ocoee  Florida
Christopher Henke   Kittatinny Regional High School Newton New Jersey
Brian Henson   Walnut Grove High School Prosper Texas
Samuel Hjort   Mission High School Mission Texas
Matt Howe   Cathedral City High School Cathedral City California
Cole Hunt   Burchfield Elementary School  Oneida Tennessee
Andria Hyden   Bedichek Middle School Austin Texas
Brandi Jason Liberty High School Eldersburg Maryland
Sonja Jewell Loudoun Country Day School Leesburg Virginia
Jennifer Jimenez South Miami Sr. High School Miami Florida
John Johnson Boyd County High School  Ashland Kentucky
Amir Jones Thomas W. Harvey High School Painesville Ohio
Brian Joyce South Jones High School Ellisville Mississippi
Wimberly Kennedy Red Bank High School  Chattanooga Tennessee
Larry Kennon Troy Christian Junior High/High School Troy Ohio
Joshua Krohn Brent Elementary School Washington Washington, D.C.
Erin Kronzek Unity School Delray Beach Florida
Sarah Labrie Lexington High School Lexington Massachusetts
J Alan Landers Lakenheath High School Apo Armed Forces
Eric Laprade The College of New Jersey Ewing New Jersey
Samantha Leali Shenango Junior/Senior High School New Castle Pennsylvania
Richelle Lenoir Global Leadership Academy High School Jacksonville Florida
Lindsay Linderman Murray LaSaine Montessori School Charleston South Carolina
Katanna Linn Highlands Ranch High School  Highlands Ranch  Colorado
Candace Love August Boeger Middle School San Jose California
Christopher Lubken Robert Service High School Anchorage Alaska
Ryan Mack P.S. 10 Magnet School of Math, Science, and Design Technology Brooklyn New York
Rebecca MacLeod University of Illinois Urbana Champaign Champaign Illinois
Adrian Maclin Cordova High School Memphis Tennessee
Cyndi Mancini Montour High School McKees Rocks Pennsylvania
Kate Margrave Pine Creek High School Colorado Springs Colorado
Matt Martindale Shelby County High School  Columbiana Alabama
Abigail Martinez Erie Middle School Erie Colorado
Kathleen McCarthy Attleboro High School Attleboro Massachusetts
Leigh Ann McClain Griffin Middle School The Colony Texas
Erin McConnell Camillus Middle School Camillus New York
Lawrence McCrobie Valley High School Louisville Kentucky
Jay McCulley Sunset Middle School Brentwood  Tennessee
Angela McKenna Classen School of Advanced Studies at Northeast High School Oklahoma City Oklahoma
Jonathan R.P. McTier III Alief Hastings High School  Houston  Texas
Kimberly Meader Green Bay Preble High School Green Bay Wisconsin
Jessie Mersinger New Brunswick High School New Brunswick  New Jersey
Adam Mewhorter Southmoore High School Moore Oklahoma
James Minnix Central Connecticut State University New Britian Connecticut
Jake Mitchell Hebron Middle School Shepherdsville Kentucky
William J. Molineaux The Osceola County School for the Arts Kissimmee Florida
Darren Motamedy Walter Johnson International Academy   Las Vegas Nevada
Jonathan Mracko Postlethwait Middle School Camden Wyoming Delaware
Curtis Mulvenon Shawnee Mission West High School Overland Park Kansas
Elizabeth Nardone EM Stanton School Philadelphia Pennsylvania
Michelle Nielsen Diamond Canyon School Anthem Arizona
Kelly Nieman Alden Intermediate School Alden New York
Mallory Norton Weddington High School Matthews North Carolina
Heather Orr Montgomery High School Montgomery Texas
Augustine Ortiz Edgar Allen Poe Middle School  San Antonio  Texas
Jeremy Overbeck Century High School Bismarck North Dakota
Andrew Pahos John Sevier Middle School Kingsport Tennessee
Lindsey Parker Laguna Beach High School Laguna Beach California
Andrew Pease Hartwick College Oneonta New York
TJ Pelanek Underwood Public School  Underwood Minnesota
Justin Peterson Middle School 67Q Louis Pasteur Little Neck New York
Anthony Pickard Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. High School Lithonia Georgia
Preston Pierce Plano West Senior High School  Plano Texas
Thomas Pierre Rosa L. Parks ES Hyattsville Maryland
Chris Pierson Chaparral High School Las Vegas Nevada
Jonathan Powell West End High School  Walnut Grove  Alabama
Courtney Powers Hoboken Charter School Hoboken New Jersey
Briony Price Gramercy Arts High School New York City New York
Neal Raskin Big Foot Union High School Walworth Wisconsin
Marc Ratner Mineola High School Garden City Park New York
Tess Remy-Schumacher University of Central Oklahoma  Edmond Oklahoma
Stephen Rew Raymore-Peculiar High School Peculiar Missouri
Cindy Reynolds Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic School  Shawnee  Kansas
Lou Ribar Lenape Elementary Ford City Pennsylvania
Dianna Richardson Cleveland School of the Arts Cleveland Ohio
Michael Richardson Perry Meridian High School Indianapolis Indiana
Leslie Riedel Capital High School Charleston  West Virginia
Adam Robinson Norwood High School Norwood  Ohio
James Robinson Elkin High School Elkin North Carolina
Nathan Rodahl Port Angeles High School Port Angeles Washington
Darren Rodgers St. Augustine High School New Orleans Louisiana
Lenae Rose Morgan County High School Madison Georgia
Stewart Rosen Walter Reed Middle School North Hollywood California
David Roth Lakeside High School Ashtabula Ohio
Seth Rowoldt Annunciation Orthodox School Houston Texas
Stefanie Sagaro Academy for Innovative Education Charter School Miami Springs Florida
Maura Saint Blackhawk High School Beaver Falls Pennsylvania
Mike Scott Columbia Basin College Pasco Washington
Kelly Seymour Ballston Spa Middle/High School Ballston Spa New York
Natalie Sheeler Sturgis Charter Public School Hyannis Massachusetts
Matthew Shephard Meridian Early College High School Sanford Michigan
Aleshia Shouse Christian Academy of Indiana New Albany Indiana
Alex Sieira Harrison High School Harrison  New Jersey
Adria Smith Marblehead Community Charter Public School Marblehead Massachusetts
Anthony Spano Culver City High School Culver City California
William Steadman General McLane High School Edinboro Pennsylvania
Mike Steep Parkway Northeast Middle School Creve Coeur Missouri
Katie Stephens Charles D. Owen High School Black Mountain North Carolina
Evelyn Stohlman Bishop Shanahan High School Downingtown Pennsylvania
Kokoe Tanaka-Suwan Parsons Memorial & Purchase Elementary Schools Harrison New York
Jameelah Taylor Trevor Day School New York City New York
Brian Teed Wakeland High School Frisco Texas
Josh Tharp West Fairmont Middle School and Rivesville Elementary/Middle School Fairmont West Virginia
Jennifer Theisen-Gray William M. Colmer Middle School Pascagoula Mississippi
Mark Thomas Upper Perkiomen Pennsburg Pennsylvania
Zachary Thomas Ledyard High School Ledyard Connecticut
Alex Underwood Hays High School Hays Kansas
Craig Uppercue Volusia County Schools Daytona Beach Florida
Lindsay Vasko Walnut Grove High School Prosper Texas
Allen Venezio East River High School Orlando Florida
Felicia Villa Point Pleasant Borough High School Point Pleasant New Jersey
James Villegas Grossmont High School El Cajon California
Rachel Waddell Colorado State University Fort Collins Colorado
Meghan Wagner Auburn Riverside High School Auburn Washington
Bryan Waites Clements High School Sugar Land Texas
Donald Walter Northwest Guilford High School and Northwest Guilford Middle School Greensboro North Carolina
Victoria Warnet Columbus State University Columbus Georgia
Christopher Weddel Fremont High School Fremont Nebraska
Elliot Weeks Seattle Preparatory School Seattle Washington
Kayla Werlin Longmeadow High School Longmeadow Massachusetts
Bryce Werntz Oak Hill High School Oak Hill Ohio
Robert West Clark High School Las Vegas Nevada
Aria Westbrook Hawfields Middle School Mebane North Carolina
Kimberly Whitehead Sikeston High School Sikeston Missouri
Jeremy Williams Marrero Middle School Marrero Louisiana
Doretha Williams GEO Next Generation High School Baton Rouge Louisiana
Kelly Winovich Northgate Middle/Senior High School Pittsburgh Pennsylvania
Kate Wisbey Charlottesville Catholic School Charlottesville  Virginia
Elise Witt Global Village Project Decatur Georgia
Scott Woodard West Virginia State University Institute West Virginia
Amber Yates Thompson Middle School Alabaster Alabama
Christopher-Rey Yraola Ramón C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts Los Angeles California

LEGACY APPLICANTS

Name School City State  
Bruce Adams Sam Houston High School San Antonio Texas  
Casie Adams Martinsburg High School Martinsburg West Virginia
Miguel Aguiar Southwest High School San Antonio Texas
Dawn Amthor Wallkill Senior High School Wallkill New York
Christopher Andrews Hephzibah High School Hephzibah Georgia
Jeanne Andrews Petway Elementary School  Vineland  New Jersey
Justin Antos Dwight D. Eisenhower High School Blue Island Illinois
Javier Arau New York Jazz Academy New York New York
Timothy Arnold Orono High School Long Lake Minnesota
Elizabeth Baker Mary Martin Elementary Weatherford  Texas
Andre Barnes Science Park High School Newark New Jersey
Jeremy Bartunek Greenbriar School Northbrook Illinois
Adem Birson New York University  New York  New York
Benjamin Blasko Lipscomb University Nashville Tennessee
Amanda Blevins Tri-Valley High School Dresden Ohio
Susan Boddie Valdosta State University Valdosta Georgia
Adrian Bonner Lancaster High School Lancaster Texas
Steve Browne Nashville Community High School Nashville Illinois
Ryan Bulgarelli Williamsport Area High School Williamsport Pennsylvania
Cathryn Burt East Newton High School Granby Missouri
James Byrn, Jr. Maconaquah High School Bunker Hill Indiana
Mary Catherine Campbell Seven Pines Elementary School Sandston Virginia
Helen Capehart Bridgeport High School Bridgeport Texas
Marcos Carreras Conservatory of the Arts Springfield Massachusetts
Roger Chagnon Westfield Academy and Central School Westfield New York
Kristopher Chandler Gautier High School Gautier Mississippi
Jeff Chang Decatur High School Federal Way Washington
Travis Coakley William Carey University  Hattiesburg Mississippi
Vanessa Cobb Montgomery Central High School Cunningham  Tennessee
Trish Conover  Community Middle School  Plainsboro New Jersey
John Contreras Pueblo High School Tucson Arizona
Daniel Cook Ithaca College Ithaca New York
Kyle Cook Western Branch Middle School Chesapeake Virginia
Travis Cook Plymouth Christian Academy  Canton Michigan
Andrew Cote Merrimack College North Andover Massachusetts
Drew Cowell Belleville East High School Belleville Illinois
Cory Joy Craig Benton Intermediate School Benton Louisiana
Matthew Cunningham Brockton High School Brockton Massachusetts
Isaac Daniel III Stax Music Academy Memphis Tennessee
Jackie Deen Pottsboro High School Pottsboro Texas
Matthew Denman  Classen School of Advanced Studies Oklahoma City Oklahoma
Ryan Diefenderfer Paradise Valley High School Phoenix Arizona
Jennifer DiVasto Pennridge School District Perkasie Pennsylvania
Antoine Dolberry P.S. 103 Hector Fontanez School Bronx New York
George Dragoo Stevens High School Rapid City South Dakota
Marisa Drake Patuxent High School Lusby Maryland
Kathleen Dudley Andrew Cooke Magnet School Waikegan Illinois
Jonathan Eising James Hubert Blake High School Silver Spring Maryland
Jonathan Eldridge Weston Public Schools Weston Massachusetts
Carol Evans Gwynedd Mercy University Gwynedd Valley Pennsylvania
Anthony Ferreira Suffield High School West Suffield Connecticut
Tamara Frazier North Valleys High School Reno Nevada
J.D. Frizzell Briarcrest Christian School Eads Tennessee
Chesteron Frye St. Helena College & Career Academy Denham Springs Louisiana
Matt Gerry Salina South Middle School Salina Kansas
Anna Girling Sebastopol Attendance Center Sebastopol Mississippi
Serena Gorham Weare Middle School Weare New Hampshire
Kylie Griffin Dozier Elementary Erath Louisiana
Jessica Gronberg Hawkes Bluff Elementary   Davie Florida
Nathaniel Gunter Greer High School Greer South Carolina
Amy Hannequin Bethel Middle School Bethel Connecticut
Crystal Harding Ypsilanti Community High School Ypsilanti Michigan
Diane Harrigan Bloom High School Chicago Heights Illinois
Toye Harris Miami High School Miami Oklahoma
Chris Hayslette Bridgeport Middle School  Bridgeport West Virginia
Colette Hebert  Yonkers Public Schools  Yonkers New York
Martha Heise Seventh Street School Oil City Pennsylvania
Jonathan Helmick Slippery Rock University Slippery Rock Pennsylvania
Joel Hill Velma Jackson High School & Shirley Camden Mississippi
Elaine Holmes Comsewogue High School Port Jefferson Station New York
Victor Iapalucci Phillip Barbour High School Philippi West Virginia
Devin James Salem High School Conyers Georgia
Heidi Jaye Daniel Webster Elementary School New Rochelle New York
Jamie Jones Manzano Day School Albuquerque New Mexico
Daniel Joosten Edgerton High School Edgerton Wisconsin
Brett Keith Northern Bedford County Middle/High  Loysburg Pennsylvania
Deonte Kennedy Craigmont High School Memphis Tennessee
Lou Kitchner Bedford Middle School Westport Connecticut
Michael Kiyoi San Marcos High School Santa Barbara California
Kate Klotz Monarch High School Louisville Colorado
Heidi Kohler Ypsilanti Community High School East Amherst New York
Michael Lapomardo Shrewsbury High School  Shrewsbury Massachusetts
Morgan Lentino Otter Creek Elementary Elgin Illinois
Lisa Linde Newton South High School Newton Massachusetts
Cole Lundquist  Gloucester High School Gloucester Massachusetts
Marci Malone DeAmbrose Lincoln Southwest High School Lincoln Nebraska
Bob Mamminga St. Francis High School Wheaton Illinois
Jayson Martinez Arts High School Newark New Jersey
Kevin McDonald Wellesley High School  Wellesley Massachusetts
Larrian Menifee Ball High School Galveston Texas
Kim Mettert East Noble Middle School Kendallville Indiana
Natalie Moore Sullivan High School Sullivan Missouri
Coty Raven Morris Portland State University  Portland Oregon
Brian Nabors Shelby High School Shelby Ohio
Jenny Neff University of the Arts Philadelphia Pennsylvania
Cassandra Nelson Mountaineer Middle School  Morgantown West Virginia
Trevor Nicholas Nicholas Senn High School Chicago Illinois
Sam Noyce Thomas Jefferson Jr. High School Kearns Utah
Tim O’Donnell Ephrata High School Ephrata Washington
Shakia Paylor City Neighbors High School Baltimore Maryland
Kathy Perconti  Wayne Central High School  Ontario Center New York
Catherine Plichta Theatre Arts Production Company School Bronx New York
Felix Ponce Back of the Yards College Preparatory High School Chicago Illinois
David Pope Baldwin Wallace University  Berea Ohio
Brian Querry Charles A. Huston Middle School Lower Burrell Pennsylvania
Lance Rauh Patriot Oaks Academy St. Johns Florida
Hoza Redditt MSA East Academy Saint Gabriel Louisiana
Heather Rentz St. Mark School (Westpark) Cleveland Ohio
Sarah Riechers Thurgood Marshall Elementary School Manassas Virginia
Stephanie Robertson Ponchatoula High School Ponchatoula Louisiana
Bethany Robinson Noblesville High School Noblesville Indiana
Keith Robinson Jefferson Avenue Elementary Seguin Texas
Alberto Rodriguez Mount Vernon High School Alexandria Virginia
Shawn Royer Marian University Indianapolis Indiana
Dayshawn Russell North Iberville Elementary and High School Rosedale Louisiana
Hannah Ryan University of Virginia’s College at Wise Wise Virginia
Kyle Ryan Turkey Hill School Orange Connecticut
Ashley Sands Kennedy Secondary School Fergus Falls Minnesota
Mark Santos Santa Ana High School Santa Ana California
Danni Schmitt Roland Park Elementary/Middle School Baltimore Maryland
Kevin Schoenbach Oswego High School Oswego Illinois
Eric Schultz Coastal Carolina University Conway South Carolina
Josh Settlemyre R.J. Reynolds High School Winston-Salem North Carolina
Jason Shiuan Saratoga High School Saratoga California
Katie Silcott Olentangy Shanahan Middle School Lewis Center Ohio
Thomas Slater Sumter School District Sumter South Carolina
Joani Slawson Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy Melbourne Florida
Timothy Sloan Albright Middle School Houston Texas
Andrew Smith Charlotte Central School Charlotte Vermont
Cathryn Smith Coleman High School Coleman Texas
Jessie Smith Yes Prep Public Schools Houston Texas
Patrick Smith Cooperative Arts High School New Haven Connecticut
Tony Spano Culver City High School Culver City  California
Wes Sparkes Eagleview Middle School Colorado Springs Colorado
Julian Spires  Meade Middle School  Fort Meade Maryland
Shannon Stem University Academy Panama City Florida
Harold Stephan Stuyvesant High School  New York New York
Cassandra Sulbarán Braintree High School Braintree Massachusetts
Lynn Sweet Mount Anthony Union High School Bennington Vermont
Jessica Torres Elmont Memorial Jr/Sr High School  Elmont New York
Michelle Trinidad Sacred Heart School Bronx New York
Alice Tsui  New Bridges Elementary Brooklyn New York
Martin Urbach Harvest Collegiate High School New York New York
Johny Vargas Pueblo High School Tucson Arizona
Amy Villanova Canyon Crest Academy San Diego California
Valerie Vinnard Webster Elementary Long Beach California
Kenneth Walker Ralls ISD Ralls Texas
Jennifer Walter University of North Carolina at Greensboro Greensboro North Carolina
John Ware Stovall Middle School Houston Texas
Brandon Weeks North Polk High School Alleman Iowa
Lisa Werner St. Bruno Parish School  Dousman Wisconsin
Elizabeth White Holcomb RIII Holcomb Missouri
Tyler Wigglesworth West Covina High School West Covina California
Paula Williams The Ron Clark Academy Atlanta Georgia
Sandi Wilson  Franklin School of Innovation  Asheville North Carolina
Damion Womack The Montgomery Academy Montgomery Alabama
Tammy Yi Chapman University and LA Phil YOLA Program Orange County California
Jason Younts Samuel V. Champion High School Boerne Texas
DeAnna Zecchin Indian River High School Dagsboro Delaware
Normani in 2023
Normani attends Elle's Women In Hollywood event in 2023.

Photo: MICHAEL TRAN/AFP via Getty Images

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Breaking Down Normani's Journey To 'Dopamine': How Her Debut Album Showcases Resilience & Star Power

The wait for Normani's first album, 'Dopamine,' is officially over. Upon the album's arrival, reflect on all of the major moments that have happened in the six years since she made her solo debut.

GRAMMYs/Jun 14, 2024 - 09:39 pm

All eyes are on Normani as her long-awaited debut album, Dopamine, arrives to eager fans and critics alike on June 14. It arrives more than six years after Normani made her solo debut post-Fifth Harmony — and though she has released a number of singles since, even her most loyal listeners were bewildered by the delay of her debut project. But the 28-year-old has been strategic in building something timeless.

"I took the time to learn and develop my sound. I wanted to be different and create a body of work that's unique but still fresh and exciting," Normani tells GRAMMY.com. "There were many days of trial and error trying to perfect something that embodies who I am and the type of artist I wanted to be. I always knew that I had to trust myself even when others doubted me and questioned my hunger."

On the highly anticipated Dopamine, Normani's womanhood and artistic breadth effortlessly glides across its 13 tracks. She makes no apologies for her sexier image and music after years of "feeling safe with being seen, but not too seen," as she told Teen Vogue in 2020. That newfound confidence translates into a musical paradise that's a far cry from her Fifth Harmony days. Up until now, the world has only received Normani's talent in snippets here and there; Dopamine finally gives us the full dose.

As you dig into Dopamine, take a look at a complete breakdown of every major moment that's led to Normani's long-awaited debut project.

2018: She Re-Introduced Herself As An R&B Star

A mere month prior to Fifth Harmony's hiatus announcement, a then 21-year-old Normani teamed up with Khalid for her first-ever single as a solo act, "Love Lies." Penned for the Love, Simon soundtrack, the sultry R&B number foreshadowed Normani's imminent success outside of Fifth Harmony; not only did it crack the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100, but it hit No. 1 on both Billboard's Mainstream Top 40 and Radio Songs charts.

At the tail end of 2018, Normani delivered another R&B jam, the hazy, slow-burning duet with 6lack, "Waves," which found success on multiple R&B charts. Though somewhat forgotten compared to "Motivation" and "Wild Side" (more on those later), "Waves" shows off Normani's vocal range as she laments over an on-again, off-again relationship.

2019: She Celebrated A Global Smash & Massive Opening Act Slot

Normani struck gold again in 2019 when she teamed up with Sam Smith for "Dancing With a Stranger," which became the most-played radio song in the world that year, according to Forbes. Sonically speaking, the disco-tinged oasis marked new territory for Normani — and it paid off in a big way as it boasts over a billion Spotify streams and remains her biggest single to date.

The singer's star continued shining bright into that summer, when she served as the opener for the North American leg of Ariana Grande's Sweetener Tour. The arena trek marked her first opportunity to show off her performing skills, and further prove her prowess as a solo act.

On the heels of the international success of "Dancing With a Stranger" and touring with Grande, Normani released her first fully solo single, "Motivation." The bubbly track presented a poppier side and offered a fun moment with its Y2K-inspired video, even igniting a viral dance challenge. But it seemingly wasn't indicative of the direction she was headed; at the time, Normani admitted to The Cut that she "didn't feel like it represented" her as an artist.

Still, "Motivation" served as a pivotal moment for Normani. It became a top 20 hit on Billboard's Mainstream Top 40 chart, and she delivered a showstopping performance of the song at the MTV Video Music Awards — which even earned the title of 2019's best performance from Harper's Bazaar.

2020 & 2021: She Teamed Up With Two Of Rap's Biggest Female Stars

The next couple of years saw Normani continue linking up with several of her peers. She first joined forces with Megan Thee Stallion for the anthemic "Diamonds" — which brilliantly samples Marilyn Monroe's "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" — off the Birds of Prey soundtrack. Soon after, she teamed up with Megan again — this time, for a jaw-dropping cameo in the video for the chart-topping smash "WAP" with Cardi B.

"WAP" drew criticism for its sexually explicit lyrics (and equally racy video), but the message aligned perfectly with Normani's mission to champion and represent Black women in and outside of the music industry. 

"The 'WAP' video I was really, really excited to be a part of, just because I feel like we're in a time in music where women — and Black women — are really on top, which is something I feel like we haven't seen in a very, very long time," she told Teen Vogue. "Where I come from, we were all about female empowerment. The fact that I could be a part of such a special moment embracing our sexuality, in which I definitely think there's a double standard, [was exciting] to be a part of it."

In 2021, Normani took her turn with Cardi B on another fiery track, "Wild Side," which saw her return to her R&B foundation while also continuing her artistic evolution. From sampling Aaliyah's "One in a Million" to executing the intricate choreography seen in the Tanu Muino-directed video, the '90s-inspired slow jam — which closes out Dopamine — whet fans' appetite and established Normani as a force to be reckoned with in R&B and beyond.

2022: She Traversed Several Different Musical Worlds

Keeping fans on their toes, Normani veered away slightly from her signature R&B sound by incorporating synth-pop into the one-off single "Fair." The mid-tempo track put the spotlight on her vulnerability; the lyrics deal with watching a past lover move on as if you never existed.

"This one is really unique and different for me. Probably not what everyone is expecting," she said in an Instagram story ahead of the release.

A few months later, Normani dove deeper into the dance genre by lending her light and airy vocals to Calvin Harris' "New to You," a collaboration that also featured Tinashe and Offset. But she never strayed too far from her R&B stylings, as she also teamed up with childhood friend Josh Levi for a remix of his song "Don't They" that summer.

2023: She Ushered In A New Era

Though 2023 didn't see any new music from Normani, she made some business moves that indicated she was ready for a reset. That May, Normani parted ways with S10 Entertainment and Brandon Silverstein after signing a new management deal with Brandon Creed and Lydia Asrat — signifying a new chapter and much-needed change in direction. 

"The transition signified a new beginning, filled with hopes of  moving forward and getting things done that were important to me," Normani tells GRAMMY.com. "I was faced with many obstacles over the years, some that you would not believe. But through it all, my faith in God kept me aligned with what I felt was right for me."

A couple months later, Normani launched a partnership with Bose that saw her give a first preview of the assertive Dopamine track "Candy Paint." She also offered some insight to the album delays, which partially stemmed from her parents' health struggles.

"It was hard feeling misunderstood because of the lack of knowledge people had for my circumstances in real-time. I don't even know if I had the energy to explain — my emotional, spiritual and mental endurance was really tested," she explained to Dazed. "When my parents got sick, I didn't have the mental capacity to even try to be creative, but I pushed myself anyway. If it weren't for them, I probably wouldn't have, but I know it's what got them through such a tough time — they needed to see me persevere and push through and continue to move forward."

As she shared with Bose, crafting Dopamine ended up being a creative outlet for Normani and offered a sign of hope for her and her parents during their respective treatments.

"(When my mom was going through chemo) the thing that really kept her going was getting on FaceTime and being like, 'How are the sessions going?' She's always so eager to hear the new records we've been working on," she said. "And then a year later, when my dad ended up being diagnosed, he would say mid treatment, 'I'm ready for you to take over the world.'"

2024: She Completed A Hard-Fought Journey

By the beginning of 2024, even Normani couldn't help but acknowledge how long fans had been waiting for her debut LP. She facetiously launched a website called wheresthedamnalbum.com — but it actually served as the official kickoff to the album campaign.

Two months after she shared the album's title and stunning cover art on the site, Normani delivered the guitar-driven lead single "1:59" arrived, as well as a release date for Dopamine.

Despite a series of false starts and personal challenges, Dopamine is proof that Normani is as resilient as they come — and this project was well worth the wait. Opening tracks "Big Boy" and "Still" flex her swag, whereas Janet Jackson-coded tunes like "All Yours" and "Lights On" (co-written with Victoria Monét) ooze sensual vibes. While the album mostly caters to her R&B foundation, she touches on her dance music dabblings with the house-leaning"Take My Time." 

Dopamine even offered a full-circle moment for Normani, who has cited Brandy as one of her biggest musical inspirations. The R&B trailblazer lends background vocals to "Insomnia," which also features hypnotic production from Stargate

As Normani embraces her close-up, she's keenly aware that the stakes are high, but it's a moment she's been ready for all along.

"I hope [fans] see the passion and the hard work that I have put into creating something so special," she tells GRAMMY.com. "I love my fans and how they have been patiently waiting and supporting me over the years. I hope the wait was worth it for them and they are proud of what we have accomplished together."

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Musicians Mark Stoermer, Brandon Flowers, Ronnie Vannucci and David Keuning of The Killers poses for a portrait during the 2004 Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on December 8, 2004 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
The Killers

Photo: Frank Micelotta

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5 Ways ‘Hot Fuss’ Propelled The Killers To Rock Royalty

During the alternative-guitar-band renaissance of the early 2000s, the Killers slugged out a debut album that’ll stick with us forever. Here are five reasons ‘Hot Fuss’ catapulted the Vegas favorites to the top.

GRAMMYs/Jun 14, 2024 - 05:19 pm

They came out of their cage, and now they're doing just fine. 

In an era of stiff competition, from the White Stripes to the Strokes, the Killers could have gotten lost in the shuffle. But with 2004's Hot Fuss, the Brandon Flowers-led, Vegas-based rock band essentially emerged fully formed, with a debonaire mystique, a raided new wave record collection (think the Cure and Duran Duran), and a knack for sky-high hooks. They didn't just nail the songs, and charisma, on the first go — they created one of the most timeless albums of their generation. 

In the 20 years since, chances are "Mr. Brightside" has gotten maddeningly stuck in your head at least once. But that's just the tip of the iceberg: Hot Fuss is teeming with cryptic one-liners, sticky melodies and a specifically aughts sort of emotional abandon.

Today, the Killers are one of the biggest rock bands of the 21st century, with five GRAMMY nominations and more than 28 million records sold worldwide. Here are five aspects of Hot Fuss that helped them break into the stratosphere.  

It's The Result Of A Completely Scrapped First Attempt 

Sometimes, the first thought isn't the best thought. The Killers were full steam ahead on their debut album when Flowers hit a major snag: a little album called This Is It by the Strokes came out. 

"When we put it on in the car, that record just sounded so perfect," Flowers admitted to NME in 2012. "I got so depressed after that, we threw away everything, and the only song that made the cut and remained was 'Mr. Brightside.'" 

How would the Killers' legacy have changed without classics like "Somebody Told Me" and "Jenny Was a Friend of Mine"? We'll never know — but the band (and the world) is likely glad they gave Hot Fuss a second shot. 

Brandon Flowers Is A Superb Lyricist 

Did you know Hot Fuss has an extended murder narrative? Well, in two songs: "Midnight Show" and "Jenny Was a Friend of Mine." (The third act, "Leave the Bourbon on the Shelf," was relegated to their 2007 B-sides and rarities disc, Sawdust.) 

Outside of sprawling concepts, Flowers' sneaky prowess as a lyricist is all over Hot Fuss, from sticky alliteration ("Turning saints into the sea/ Swimming through sick lullabies") to masterful use of negative space. 

Exhibit A is "Smile Like You Mean It": "Someone is calling my name/ From the back of the restaurant/ And someone is playing a game/ In the house that I grew up in/ And someone will drive her around/ Down the same streets that I did." By erasing the specifics, and only providing a framework of memory, the picture is ever more elusive and intriguing. 

The Album Is Front-Loaded With Five Bangers 

Sure, some tracks on Hot Fuss, like "Change Your Mind" and "Believe Me Natalie," are relatively minor. 

But with absolute napalm across the first five tracks — "Jenny Was a Friend of Mine," "Mr. Brightside," "Smile Like You Mean It," "Somebody Told Me," "All These Things That I've Done" — it's actually kind of a relief to get a sleeper album track, that reveals its qualities slower. 

No matter your take on the rest of Hot Fuss, or their discography, the fact remains undeniable: they came in swinging. 

They Kept The Demos Intact For Raw Impact 

The Killers and the Boss have crossed paths a time or two — and they made a Springsteenian move when they used demos as the final tracks. It worked, imbuing Hot Fuss with a certain spontaneity and energy. 

And because these Hot Fuss tracks were meant to comprise a demo, "We never thought [these songs] would be on a record." drummer Ronnie Vannucci Jr. later admitted. Talk about a turn of events: what could have been a collection of scratch tracks would help define a generation. 

"Mr. Brightside" Took On A Life Of Its Own 

"Mr. Brightside" has undeniably become the Killers' signature song — a staple not only at their concerts, but at bars and karaoke joints around the world. And once social media came along, it inspired a cornucopia of memes: even snippets of lyrics, like "Comin' out of my cage" and "It started out with a kiss, how did it end up like this?" have become miniature cultural forces. 

Aside from Flowers' almost unwaveringly single-note verse melody, the song's odd structure — the second verse is the same as the first — has also been ripe for humor: one favorite meme takes you into the fictional writer's room when that decision was made. 

Whether for rock 'n' roll transcendence, or just a nostalgic laugh, revisit Hot Fuss as it turns 20 — and smile like you mean it. 

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