meta-scriptNIKI Is Ready To Reveal Her True Self On 'Nicole': "I Have A Better Idea Of Who I Am And Who I Want To Be" | GRAMMY.com
NIKI Is Ready To Reveal Her True Self On 'Nicole': "I Have A Better Idea Of Who I Am And Who I Want To Be"
NIKI

Photo: Gabriel Chiu

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NIKI Is Ready To Reveal Her True Self On 'Nicole': "I Have A Better Idea Of Who I Am And Who I Want To Be"

One of 88rising's most promising rising acts, NIKI has gone from self-made YouTube artist to a history-making star. On her second album 'Nicole,' the singer reintroduces herself while paying homage to her roots.

GRAMMYs/Aug 12, 2022 - 03:08 pm

Growing up, Indonesian singer NIKI didn't see many mainstream artists that she could relate to. But that didn't stop her from pursuing her dreams. 

Born Nicole Zefanya, NIKI taught herself to play guitar and write songs, eventually winning a contest to open for Taylor Swift at age 15. She first posted her music to YouTube in 2014, quickly garnering more than 40,000 followers. Fast forward eight years, and the now 23-year-old NIKI boasts over a billion streams, is headlining her own tour, and recently became the first Indonesian artist to perform at Coachella — cementing herself as a star. 

Now based in the U.S. and signed to Asian-American management company 88rising, NIKI is working to change the entertainment landscape for her fellow aspiring young artists who had to pave their own way. Not only does her sound evolve with each new project — blending pop, alternative and R&B — but NIKI has full creative control, writing, recording and producing her own music.

NIKI's self-made journey has amounted to her self-titled album, Nicole. Due Aug. 12, the project feels like a journey from her upbringing to now, thanks to autobiographical songs like "Before" and "High School in Jakarta." Plus, the album is made up of re-recordings of her YouTube clips, showing both her growth and the prowess she's had as a songwriter since the start.

Ahead of the release of Nicole, GRAMMY.com spoke to NIKI via Zoom to discuss her inspirations, hopes and next steps of her career.

You wrote the song "Oceans & Engines" when you were 17. There's a lot of other songs on Nicole that you recorded years ago. Why did you want to re-record them for this album?

During the pandemic, I sat with myself and did a deep dive of all of these songs and kind of did an audit of my life, essentially, and my music. And I had this realization that I still very much relate and resonate with all of this old music. It represented me in a way that the music I put out thus far has not, in a way. I wanted to show my fans that side of me that I think has been hidden for a while.

"Before" and "Oceans & Engines" were the first two singles from the album. Why did they feel like the right songs to release first?

Essentially, I'm telling the story in reverse chronology. So "Before" is the end, and "Oceans & Engines" is sort of the middle of the story. "High School," is the last one that's not out yet. It's sort of like the start of everything. I'm just trying to piece together a timeline through the music.

I can tell that you're a really good songwriter. What goes into your process when you're writing a song?

Usually, I will start with a lyric bank — it's a note in my Notes app that I keep adding to whenever I have a thought or a lyric idea. And usually I parse through that note, and start singing random melodies with whatever lyric I choose from that note. It normally starts with me freestyling melodies while I play guitar or while I have Logic open.

Has that process changed over the years?

Absolutely. I think I'm also completely generalizing when I say that it normally starts like that. It's changed for sure. I'm a much better producer than I was when I was 17. It started with GarageBand and a really cheap mic. Honestly I still absolutely prefer cheap mics.

Do you have any musical inspirations or any songwriters that you look up to?

Taylor Swift was pretty formative. Lyrically, I looked up to her a lot. Now, I look up to people like Phoebe Bridgers, musically and sonically.

I also have been listening to a lot of Beck. That's not something that I was conscious of until recently — I guess I've been like, unconsciously or passively listening to Beck over the years. But he's awesome.

I also grew up with a lot of R&B as well, which is a different end of the spectrum. I grew up with a lot of different influences.

So how would you describe the sound or genre of this album?

I would say organic alt, nostalgic pop.

I feel like we got a good sense of your upbringing from this album, especially songs like "High School in Jakarta," "Before," etc. Is this kind of nostalgia intentional?

Yes, absolutely. It's paying tribute to younger me that put up music — I sort of feel like I owe it to her to publish these songs.

So what do you think this album really tells listeners about you?

That I feel too much. I am a serial feeler. I just love feeling things, is what I've discovered about myself over the years. I have no problem feeling sad, feeling angry, feeling whatever. I have friends that are confused by that.

It makes me feel alive to be in touch with my emotions. The best way I know how to externalize all of it is through writing and music. And so that's kind of what I did with this record.

Is there a song that has a really interesting or memorable story?

"Oceans & Engines" was done as I was taking a nap. I was at the producer's house. We were working on the song, and I just was so incredibly sleepy that day, I fell asleep.

He worked on it for three hours. It was done when I woke up, and I was like, "It's perfect. I have no notes." I call it my Sleeping Beauty song. [Laughs.]

How does this album differ from your debut album, Moonchild?

I think Moonchild was a very important step towards me figuring out what I liked musically. What's great about being with 88rising is that they have never really dictated what my sound should be. I always had free rein and control over what I wanted musically.

I started so young. I was 18, and I didn't really know what I wanted. I knew what I liked, and what I like changed, and kept changing over the years. I'm not saying that I've landed on [a] style forever.

Moonchild was more exploratory, I would say. This one feels a little bit more settled. I feel like I have a better idea of who I am and who I want to be now.

How did growing up in Jakarta affect your artistry?

Jakarta was always extremely, uh, Indonesia. I think generally, everyone was so warm, and so friendly and alive. Nobody was jaded. Now living in the States, and coming back home every now and then, it's so interesting to be immersed in the spirit of truly just being happy to be alive.

I grew up in church, with my mom singing. Every Saturday, our house was the place where they would rehearse for Sunday service. So I always was around music.

It absolutely formed my tendencies, my sensibilities, my taste, what I gravitate to. Even the melodies in church formed what I like and gravitate to. That's a recent thing I discovered about myself.

I read that representation is important to you. Did you have any Asian or Indonesian people you looked up to growing up?

It's kind of a loaded answer, but yes and no. There were definitely artists that my mother listened to, that my family listened to, that I liked and admired growing up.

But also, in terms of what, I guess, I defined as success was being on the international stage. So, transparently, as an Asian person, I didn't really see much of myself growing up.

I think now is a really electric time for Asians in general.  It's been really exciting to be a part of it and see it transformed [from] how it was literally only like 15 to 20 years ago.

Who are some Asian artists you're digging now?

I obviously love BLACKPINK. They're just awesome. They're like the Asian Spice Girls.

I've been listening to a lot of Indonesian artists as well. I think music has developed so much from back then, with the internet and people learning from one another through, like, globalization and YouTube. The music has just transformed.

All that to say, I really love this artist in Indonesia. His name is Tulus. He makes amazing music. And there's this girl named Nadin Amizah, who makes really beautiful music as well. Constantly shouting them out because they're awesome.

With all that you've accomplished already, are there any goals you're still looking to achieve? Or anything you're looking forward to doing?

Honestly, [the] tour is a big goal. I really am curious to see what it's like to tour for months on end. I've always seen other artists that I look up to do that, and just feel so connected to the fans and feel so connected to themselves through that experience.

So yeah, touring — and adding a second garden bed in my backyard.

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GRAMMY Rewind: Kendrick Lamar Honors Hip-Hop's Greats While Accepting Best Rap Album GRAMMY For 'To Pimp a Butterfly' In 2016
Kendrick Lamar

Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic

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GRAMMY Rewind: Kendrick Lamar Honors Hip-Hop's Greats While Accepting Best Rap Album GRAMMY For 'To Pimp a Butterfly' In 2016

Upon winning the GRAMMY for Best Rap Album for 'To Pimp a Butterfly,' Kendrick Lamar thanked those that helped him get to the stage, and the artists that blazed the trail for him.

GRAMMYs/Oct 13, 2023 - 06:01 pm

Updated Friday Oct. 13, 2023 to include info about Kendrick Lamar's most recent GRAMMY wins, as of the 2023 GRAMMYs.

A GRAMMY veteran these days, Kendrick Lamar has won 17 GRAMMYs and has received 47 GRAMMY nominations overall. A sizable chunk of his trophies came from the 58th annual GRAMMY Awards in 2016, when he walked away with five — including his first-ever win in the Best Rap Album category.

This installment of GRAMMY Rewind turns back the clock to 2016, revisiting Lamar's acceptance speech upon winning Best Rap Album for To Pimp A Butterfly. Though Lamar was alone on stage, he made it clear that he wouldn't be at the top of his game without the help of a broad support system. 

"First off, all glory to God, that's for sure," he said, kicking off a speech that went on to thank his parents, who he described as his "those who gave me the responsibility of knowing, of accepting the good with the bad."

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He also extended his love and gratitude to his fiancée, Whitney Alford, and shouted out his Top Dawg Entertainment labelmates. Lamar specifically praised Top Dawg's CEO, Anthony Tiffith, for finding and developing raw talent that might not otherwise get the chance to pursue their musical dreams.

"We'd never forget that: Taking these kids out of the projects, out of Compton, and putting them right here on this stage, to be the best that they can be," Lamar — a Compton native himself — continued, leading into an impassioned conclusion spotlighting some of the cornerstone rap albums that came before To Pimp a Butterfly.

"Hip-hop. Ice Cube. This is for hip-hop," he said. "This is for Snoop Dogg, Doggystyle. This is for Illmatic, this is for Nas. We will live forever. Believe that."

To Pimp a Butterfly singles "Alright" and "These Walls" earned Lamar three more GRAMMYs that night, the former winning Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song and the latter taking Best Rap/Sung Collaboration (the song features Bilal, Anna Wise and Thundercat). He also won Best Music Video for the remix of Taylor Swift's "Bad Blood." 

Lamar has since won Best Rap Album two more times, taking home the golden gramophone in 2018 for his blockbuster LP DAMN., and in 2023 for his bold fifth album, Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers.

Watch Lamar's full acceptance speech above, and check back at GRAMMY.com every Friday for more GRAMMY Rewind episodes. 

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Outside Lands 2023: 10 Female And LGBTQIA+ Performers Taking Center Stage, From Lana Del Rey To Megan Thee Stallion
Megan Thee Stallion performs at ESSENCE Festival Of Culture in July 2023.

Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images

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Outside Lands 2023: 10 Female And LGBTQIA+ Performers Taking Center Stage, From Lana Del Rey To Megan Thee Stallion

Outside Lands is stacking a sensational lineup for its 15th anniversary from Aug. 11 to 13. From aespa to Janelle Monáe, here's 10 awe-inspiring female and nonbinary artists who are ready to rule San Francisco's Golden Gate Park.

GRAMMYs/Aug 10, 2023 - 04:16 pm

This year marks the 15th anniversary of San Francisco's Outside Lands, and while the festival always boasts the Bay Area's best, the 2023 lineup is especially stacked with incredible female and nonbinary talent. From aespa making K-pop history to La Doña's homecoming, the fest's latest iteration is bound to be badass.

Whether you're planning on shimmying to Janelle Monáe, spitting every Megan Thee Stallion verse, or sobbing to Lana Del Rey, Outside Lands will be bursting with energy and seemingly endless options.

As San Francisco transforms Golden Gate Park into a lavish festival ground for three days, check out these 10 performers ready to electrify the city.

Megan Thee Stallion

Time to get lit like a match. Megan Thee Stallion has been hitting stages across the country this year — from LA Pride to her hometown of Houston for the Men's NCAA Final Four — and there's no doubt she'll bring the heat to Golden Gate Park on Sunday. Though the three-time GRAMMY winner is known for her high-hype, feel-good freestyles, her latest album, Traumazine, opens up about anxiety and the importance of self-care. So whether you're having a hot or healing girl summer, her headlining set will be the spot for festgoers to let loose.

Janelle Monáe

On Friday, Janelle Monáe will usher San Francisco into The Age of Pleasure. Sensuality and freedom flood the singer's most recent album, and for Monáe's headlining show, fans can expect bursting psychedelic soul, pop and hip-hop in an evening full of color and love.

Emphasizing intersectionality and identity (Monáe identifies as nonbinary), her wide-ranging performance will traverse her trailblazing concept albums like GRAMMY-nominated Dirty Computer and The ArchAndroid. Having conquered both the big screen and the stage as a multihyphenate, Monáe's set will be nothing short of a spectacle.

beabadoobee

Hot off supporting Taylor Swift's Eras Tour, beabadoobee is headed to Golden Gate Park on Sunday afternoon. The Filipino-English singer/songwriter has carved out a space for herself between indie rock and bedroom pop, first becoming known for her sweet, spacey falsetto and her sleeper hit "Coffee" in 2020. The indie star has since expanded her worldbuilding abilities rapidly, spinning intricate scenes from her debut Fake It Flowers into her scenic second album Beatopia — similarly, beabadoobee's Outside Lands set will likely flaunt the vitality of her imagination.

Raveena

Raveena is the definition of grace, and her Friday Outside Lands set is sure to swell with serenity. Mindfulness is the objective of the singer's soulful music as she grounds herself through tranquil mixes of R&B and pop. From her 2019 debut Lucid to 2022's Asha's Awakening, her voice epitomizes comfort whether it floats through delicate strings or stony drums. At Golden Gate Park, Raveena will bring momentary, blissful peace to the festival's chaotic fun.

Ethel Cain

Ethel Cain is ready to take concertgoers to church — even on a Friday. The experimental breakout star is known for dissecting dark, Southern Gothic themes in her music, establishing herself as a rising leader in the modern alternative genre (and also in the LGBTQIA+ community, as she is a trans woman). Her debut album Preacher's Daughter only came out last year, but the critically acclaimed album swiftly earned the musician a cult following. After bewitching Coachella audiences back in April, Cain's upcoming Outside Lands set is sure to be compelling.

NIKI

More than 10 years after she wrote her first original song, NIKI is ready to storm the Twin Peaks stage. Her deeply sincere indie pop drifts with bittersweetness, and it's powerful to witness how well the Indonesian singer's intimacy translates to massive crowds.

Signed to label 88rising in 2017, NIKI soon found herself playing concerts for a growing global fan base that resonated with her heart-to-heart songwriting. Ranging from the dramatic depths of her debut album, MOONCHILD, to 2022's earnest self-titled Nicole, NIKI's Outside Lands set will be perfect for listeners who want to escape with their head in the clouds.

Lana Del Rey

Lana Del Rey is the reigning queen of summertime sadness, and she'll be doin' time at Golden Gate Park as one of Saturday's headliners. Known for spinning tales of tragic romance, the GRAMMY-nominated singer/songwriter plans to enchant audiences at Twin Peaks stage following her release of Did You Know There's a Tunnel Under Ocean Boulevard. Her discography haunts and aches, filled with everything from folky gospel to trap pop; if one thing's for sure, Del Rey's highly anticipated performance is bound to be a spiritual journey.

La Doña

Born and raised in San Francisco, La Doña is making her city proud by performing at the Bay's biggest annual music festival. Taking the Lands End stage with her 11-piece band on Friday, the Chicana musician has come a long way since picking up the trumpet at age 7.

Centering around personal identity and community, her music beautifully merges traditional Latin folk with modern cumbia, reggaeton, and hip-hop. La Doña's progressive sound just earned her a spot on Barack Obama's annual summer playlist, and less than a month later, her hometown will get to see what all of the hype is about.

aespa

When aespa takes to Twin Peaks stage Friday, they'll make history as the first K-pop act to ever perform at Outside Lands. Exploding onto the music scene in 2020, the innovative South Korean girl group gives K-pop a fresh edge, distinctively inspired by hyperpop and hip-hop. The group's name combines the words "avatar," "experience," and "aspect," representing their futuristic style that's often embellished by a metaverse aesthetic. Their mind-blowing Coachella and Governors Ball debuts hinted that aespa is ready to pull out all the stops for their Outside Lands crowd.

Maggie Rogers

Maggie Rogers knows how to break free. The 2020 Best New Artist GRAMMY nominee will get the crowd hyped for Saturday headliners Foo Fighters with an enthralling set. Although her debut album Heard It in a Past Life pulses with steady revelations, her alternative follow-up Surrender leans into sweat and desire. As she's proven at many festivals past, Rogers' show will be infused with bright energy, from the slow emotional burn of "Light On" to the exhilarating "Want Want" as the sun goes down.

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Celebrate AAPI Month 2023 With A Genre-Spanning Playlist Featuring BLACKPINK, Yaeji, Olivia Rodrigo & More
(L-R, clockwise) Yaeji, Dominic Fike, NIKI, Keshi, beabadoobee, NewJeans

Photos (L-R): Dasom Han, Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images, Gabriel Chiu, Rick Kern/Getty Images, Ethan Miller/TAS23/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management, Han Myung-Gu/WireImage

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Celebrate AAPI Month 2023 With A Genre-Spanning Playlist Featuring BLACKPINK, Yaeji, Olivia Rodrigo & More

Spotlighting artists of Asian and Pacific Islander descent, GRAMMY.com honors AAPI Heritage Month this May with 44 songs by Japanese Breakfast, NewJeans, Keshi and many more.

GRAMMYs/May 1, 2023 - 04:28 pm

As spring blossoms and May rolls around, AAPI Heritage Month reminds us to recognize and reflect on the talents of Asian American and Pacific Islander artists — across the music industry and beyond.

It's vital to celebrate diversity year-round, and May sparks additional dialogue about reshaping spaces to be more inclusive, especially within industries that are traditionally difficult to break into. Today, the music community views difference not as an obstacle, but an opportunity to celebrate individual and collective identity.

While 2023 marks 60 years since the first Asian American GRAMMY winner, AAPI creatives have been making waves in the music community for centuries. Whether you're raging to Rina Sawayama's enterprising electropop or vibing out with NIKI's soulful indie musings, AAPI artists are continuing to shape contemporary genres like never before.

In celebration of AAPI Heritage Month, GRAMMY.com compiled an original playlist to honor AAPI musicians' creativity and novelty. Take a listen to the playlist featuring more than 40 trailblazing creatives on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music and Pandora.

A Guide To Modern Funk For The Dance Floor: L'Imperatrice, Shiro Schwarz, Franc Moody, Say She She & Moniquea
Franc Moody

Photo: Rachel Kupfer 

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A Guide To Modern Funk For The Dance Floor: L'Imperatrice, Shiro Schwarz, Franc Moody, Say She She & Moniquea

James Brown changed the sound of popular music when he found the power of the one and unleashed the funk with "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag." Today, funk lives on in many forms, including these exciting bands from across the world.

GRAMMYs/Nov 25, 2022 - 04:23 pm

It's rare that a genre can be traced back to a single artist or group, but for funk, that was James Brown. The Godfather of Soul coined the phrase and style of playing known as "on the one," where the first downbeat is emphasized, instead of the typical second and fourth beats in pop, soul and other styles. As David Cheal eloquently explains, playing on the one "left space for phrases and riffs, often syncopated around the beat, creating an intricate, interlocking grid which could go on and on." You know a funky bassline when you hear it; its fat chords beg your body to get up and groove.

Brown's 1965 classic, "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag," became one of the first funk hits, and has been endlessly sampled and covered over the years, along with his other groovy tracks. Of course, many other funk acts followed in the '60s, and the genre thrived in the '70s and '80s as the disco craze came and went, and the originators of hip-hop and house music created new music from funk and disco's strong, flexible bones built for dancing.

Legendary funk bassist Bootsy Collins learned the power of the one from playing in Brown's band, and brought it to George Clinton, who created P-funk, an expansive, Afrofuturistic, psychedelic exploration of funk with his various bands and projects, including Parliament-Funkadelic. Both Collins and Clinton remain active and funkin', and have offered their timeless grooves to collabs with younger artists, including Kali Uchis, Silk Sonic, and Omar Apollo; and Kendrick Lamar, Flying Lotus, and Thundercat, respectively.

In the 1980s, electro-funk was born when artists like Afrika Bambaataa, Man Parrish, and Egyptian Lover began making futuristic beats with the Roland TR-808 drum machine — often with robotic vocals distorted through a talk box. A key distinguishing factor of electro-funk is a de-emphasis on vocals, with more phrases than choruses and verses. The sound influenced contemporaneous hip-hop, funk and electronica, along with acts around the globe, while current acts like Chromeo, DJ Stingray, and even Egyptian Lover himself keep electro-funk alive and well.

Today, funk lives in many places, with its heavy bass and syncopated grooves finding way into many nooks and crannies of music. There's nu-disco and boogie funk, nodding back to disco bands with soaring vocals and dance floor-designed instrumentation. G-funk continues to influence Los Angeles hip-hop, with innovative artists like Dam-Funk and Channel Tres bringing the funk and G-funk, into electro territory. Funk and disco-centered '70s revival is definitely having a moment, with acts like Ghost Funk Orchestra and Parcels, while its sparkly sprinklings can be heard in pop from Dua Lipa, Doja Cat, and, in full "Soul Train" character, Silk Sonic. There are also acts making dreamy, atmospheric music with a solid dose of funk, such as Khruangbin’s global sonic collage.

There are many bands that play heavily with funk, creating lush grooves designed to get you moving. Read on for a taste of five current modern funk and nu-disco artists making band-led uptempo funk built for the dance floor. Be sure to press play on the Spotify playlist above, and check out GRAMMY.com's playlist on Apple Music, Amazon Music and Pandora.

Say She She

Aptly self-described as "discodelic soul," Brooklyn-based seven-piece Say She She make dreamy, operatic funk, led by singer-songwriters Nya Gazelle Brown, Piya Malik and Sabrina Mileo Cunningham. Their '70s girl group-inspired vocal harmonies echo, sooth and enchant as they cover poignant topics with feminist flair.

While they’ve been active in the New York scene for a few years, they’ve gained wider acclaim for the irresistible music they began releasing this year, including their debut album, Prism. Their 2022 debut single "Forget Me Not" is an ode to ground-breaking New York art collective Guerilla Girls, and "Norma" is their protest anthem in response to the news that Roe vs. Wade could be (and was) overturned. The band name is a nod to funk legend Nile Rodgers, from the "Le freak, c'est chi" exclamation in Chic's legendary tune "Le Freak."

Moniquea

Moniquea's unique voice oozes confidence, yet invites you in to dance with her to the super funky boogie rhythms. The Pasadena, California artist was raised on funk music; her mom was in a cover band that would play classics like Aretha Franklin’s "Get It Right" and Gladys Knight’s "Love Overboard." Moniquea released her first boogie funk track at 20 and, in 2011, met local producer XL Middelton — a bonafide purveyor of funk. She's been a star artist on his MoFunk Records ever since, and they've collabed on countless tracks, channeling West Coast energy with a heavy dose of G-funk, sunny lyrics and upbeat, roller disco-ready rhythms.

Her latest release is an upbeat nod to classic West Coast funk, produced by Middleton, and follows her February 2022 groovy, collab-filled album, On Repeat.

Shiro Schwarz

Shiro Schwarz is a Mexico City-based duo, consisting of Pammela Rojas and Rafael Marfil, who helped establish a modern funk scene in the richly creative Mexican metropolis. On "Electrify" — originally released in 2016 on Fat Beats Records and reissued in 2021 by MoFunk — Shiro Schwarz's vocals playfully contrast each other, floating over an insistent, upbeat bassline and an '80s throwback electro-funk rhythm with synth flourishes.

Their music manages to be both nostalgic and futuristic — and impossible to sit still to. 2021 single "Be Kind" is sweet, mellow and groovy, perfect chic lounge funk. Shiro Schwarz’s latest track, the joyfully nostalgic "Hey DJ," is a collab with funkstress Saucy Lady and U-Key.

L'Impératrice

L'Impératrice (the empress in French) are a six-piece Parisian group serving an infectiously joyful blend of French pop, nu-disco, funk and psychedelia. Flore Benguigui's vocals are light and dreamy, yet commanding of your attention, while lyrics have a feminist touch.

During their energetic live sets, L'Impératrice members Charles de Boisseguin and Hagni Gwon (keys), David Gaugué (bass), Achille Trocellier (guitar), and Tom Daveau (drums) deliver extended instrumental jam sessions to expand and connect their music. Gaugué emphasizes the thick funky bass, and Benguigui jumps around the stage while sounding like an angel. L’Impératrice’s latest album, 2021’s Tako Tsubo, is a sunny, playful French disco journey.

Franc Moody

Franc Moody's bio fittingly describes their music as "a soul funk and cosmic disco sound." The London outfit was birthed by friends Ned Franc and Jon Moody in the early 2010s, when they were living together and throwing parties in North London's warehouse scene. In 2017, the group grew to six members, including singer and multi-instrumentalist Amber-Simone.

Their music feels at home with other electro-pop bands like fellow Londoners Jungle and Aussie act Parcels. While much of it is upbeat and euphoric, Franc Moody also dips into the more chilled, dreamy realm, such as the vibey, sultry title track from their recently released Into the Ether.

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