meta-scriptRosalía Wins Album Of The Year For 'El Mal Querer' At The 2019 Latin GRAMMY Awards | GRAMMY.com
Rosalía Wins Album Of The Year For 'El Mal Querer' At The 2019 Latin GRAMMY Awards

Rosalía

Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images for LARAS

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Rosalía Wins Album Of The Year For 'El Mal Querer' At The 2019 Latin GRAMMY Awards

The Spanish singer takes the top honor for her sophomore album

GRAMMYs/Nov 15, 2019 - 09:16 am

Rosalía won the biggest award of the night as she took home the 2019 Latin GRAMMY for Album of the Year for El Mal Querer. It was her fifth win of the night.

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She also took home the Latin GRAMMY for Best Urban Song for "Con Altura" with J Balvin, who wasn't in attendance, earlier in the night. The wins come just two years after she was nominated for Best New Artist at the 2017 Latin GRAMMYs. 

Other Album of the Year nominees were Visceral by Paula Arenas, Paraíso Road Gang by Rubén Blades, Cargar La Suerte by Andrés Calamaro, Agustín by Fonseca, Vida by Luis Fonsi, #Eldisco by Alejandro Sanz, ¿Dónde Bailarán Las Niñas? by Ximena Sariñana, Mas De Mi by Tony Succar, and Fantasía by Sebastián Yatra.

 The 20th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards Nominations Complete List

How The Latin GRAMMYS Brought Latin Music Excellence To The 2024 GRAMMYs
Peso Pluma attends the 2024 GRAMMYs

Photo:  Lester Cohen/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

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How The Latin GRAMMYS Brought Latin Music Excellence To The 2024 GRAMMYs

Latin music was celebrated throughout GRAMMY Week and on Music's Biggest Night. Read on for the many ways Latin music excellence was showcased at the 204 GRAMMYs.

GRAMMYs/Feb 9, 2024 - 09:56 pm

The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs may have occurred months ago and thousands of miles away, but the leading lights in Latin music also shined at the 66th GRAMMY Awards. From historic wins and meaningful nominations, to electric performances and interesting installations, Latin music excellence was everywhere. 

In anticipation of the 25th anniversary of the Latin GRAMMYs in 2024, the exclusive GRAMMY House — the site of multiple GRAMMY Week events — included a significant installation dedicated to the Biggest Night In Latin Music.

The cylindrical display showcased some of the biggest moments in Latin GRAMMY history, including images, facts, and even a real Latin GRAMMY award. 

The celebration of Latin music continued throughout GRAMMY Week, with several Latin GRAMMY-winning artists also winning on the GRAMMY stage. Among the major moments at the 2024 GRAMMYs, Karol G won her first golden gramophone for her 2023 LP Mañana Será Bonito. "This is my first time at GRAMMYs, and this is my first time holding my own GRAMMY," the Colombian songstress exclaimed during her acceptance speech. 

Música Mexicana star Peso Pluma also took home his first GRAMMY; his album GÉNESIS won in the Best Música Mexicana Album (Including Tejano) Category.

Premiere Ceremony presenter Natalia Lafourcade — whose Todas Las Flores won big at the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs — also took home the GRAMMY Award for Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album. She tied in the Category with Juanes

Premiere Ceremony performer Gabby Moreno also took home a GRAMMY Award for Best Latin Pop Album for her album X Mí (Vol. 1)

Beyond the stage, Latin artists graced the red carpet and the nominations list. For example, producer and songwriter Edgar Barrera was the only Latino nominated in the Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical Category.

10 Must-See Moments From The 2024 GRAMMYs: Taylor Swift Makes History, Billy Joel & Tracy Chapman Return, Boygenius Manifest Childhood Dreams

Pablo Alborán Reflects on His Latin GRAMMY History, Talismans & Lessons From 'La Cu4rta Hoja'
Pablo Alborán performs on stage at WiZink Center in Madrid, Spain.

Photo: Aldara Zarraoa / Redferns / GettyImages

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Pablo Alborán Reflects on His Latin GRAMMY History, Talismans & Lessons From 'La Cu4rta Hoja'

Pablo Alborán discusses his emotional journey with the Latin GRAMMYs — a total of 29 nominations and no wins — as well as the process behind his GRAMMY-nominated album 'La Cu4rta Hoja.'

GRAMMYs/Jan 8, 2024 - 02:59 pm

Spanish singer/songwriter Pablo Alborán has a unique history with the Latin GRAMMYs. Although he receives a nomination for each album he releases, he has yet to win a golden gramophone. 

At the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs, Alborán was the Spaniard with the most nominations. He received a total of five nominations, including Album Of The Year, Record Of The Year, and Song Of The Year. Yet on the Biggest Night In Latin Music, none of the envelopes that announced the winner had Alborán's name. Since 2011, he has been nominated 29 times without a win; his most meaningful accomplishment, however, is the freedom to continue making music and having untiring support from his family, friends, and fans. 

"Refer to last year's #LatinGRAMMY post," Alborán wrote on X (formerly known as Twitter), followed by a series of smiling emojis after the ceremony.

At the 2024 GRAMMYs, Alborán's 2022 album La Cu4rta Hoja is nominated for Best Latin Pop Album. The record competes against Don Juan by Maluma, A Ciegas from Paula Arena, Pedro Capó's La Neta, Gaby Moreno's X Mí (Vol. 1), and Beautiful Humans, Vol. 1 by AleMor.

During his Latin American tour, Alborán sat down with GRAMMY.com via Zoom to speak about the lessons from La Cu4rta Hoja, his history with the Latin GRAMMYs, and his return to the stages in the United States.

In 2011, you received your first Latin GRAMMY nominations for Best New Artist, Best Male Pop Vocal Album for his self-titled debut LP, and Song Of The Year for "Solamente tú." What do you remember from that ceremony?

When they told me about the Latin GRAMMYs; it was an enormous thrill. I wasn't familiar with the Latin GRAMMY because my career just started. They called me and said, 'Hey, Demi Lovato is going to sing with you,' which was also very intense. 

I remember taking my parents [to Las Vegas], which was the terrible part because they dressed formally. My mother looked like Cinderella, my father looked like a prince, my brother... They were all there and seated a little farther from us. When they announced the winners…I looked back, and my parents' faces, poor things, they looked as if I had been killed. [Laughs.]They were outraged, trying to pretend they were okay so I wouldn't see them upset. I had Sie7e and his wife sitting next to me, the happiness they felt when he won the Best New Artist award; I was shocked at how happy and excited they were. 

I was genuinely happy, suddenly seeing their happiness after so much work. I understand there's a competitive aspect; we're human beings, but I've been watching the Latin GRAMMYs for many years, living how it is, enjoying, learning to enjoy under pressure.

Unlike in the past, you had no talismans for the 24th Latin GRAMMYs ceremony. Although you did not use any at the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs, you often use talismans such as eagles, twins, and silver clothes for luck. When did this practice start? It appeared that it became an obsession, as you constantly searched for signs everywhere.

It was a way to protect myself and hang on to something and, of course, be able to let go of it as well. Thank goodness I didn't win the Latin GRAMMY when I had all the eagle signs; otherwise, my house would be filled with eagle talismans (laughs). I could see myself getting hooked on the eagle stuff. We must put everything into perspective and live the experience without overthinking. I try not to be too superstitious about anything, anyway, because it's a kind of slavery.

It has been a year since the release of La Cu4rta Hoja. What have you learned from the album and its 11 songs?

Each album is a journey; it is a new experience. Each album teaches you something different, and this one has taught me to live at the speed of musical consumption and not lose the essence in the middle of this journey. 

Being able to innovate while simultaneously maintaining your roots and supporting what you like in music —that balance will always be more challenging to maintain due to what surrounds you, the speed with which music is consumed, and the fact that millions of songs are released weekly. There are times when that effort is more challenging and other times, it is effortless. 

Touring gives me the illusion of seeing an audience that wants to feel the songs regardless of their style. People want to feel and want to see their feelings reflected in the lyrics and the music. And that reminds me why I make music and why I am here. 

Have you been surprised by reactions to any particular song from La Cu4rta Hoja?

"A Batir las Alas" surprised me a lot during concerts because it is a very personal song and, at the same time, a little strange… The lyrics, the way of singing it, the structure, and the response from the people in concerts were excellent. 

"Voraces" also surprised me a lot. It is the third song on the show's setlist. It amazes me that people sing and like it since it is a song that wasn't a single and has a strange concept; it's like a tanguillo [an upbeat and catchy flamenco palo] and, simultaneously, a chacarera [a polyrhythmic Argentinean folk subgenre].

You've always been involved with producing your albums, but you've taken a more prominent role in your last two albums. Why was that? 

In [2020's] Vértigo, I worked remotely, which was challenging. That album was very complicated to put together because I worked with Julio Reyes Copello from Miami, the strings were made in Prague, and my guitarists were in [Spain]. It was a fun process on the one hand but cold on the other. I felt like things were lost. I learned a lot on that album as well. In the end, you know how you want your song to sound, so you have to be very involved. 

On this last album, some songs didn't change much from the demo I produced at home. We wanted to stick with that first idea…playing it live and improving some things. But that production was already done. For example, "A Batir las Alas" worked with a guitar and a string, and there was not even a drum; there was barely a bass. It is a reasonably large ballad, yet we wanted to make it small. There are other times that the producer's work obviously, no matter how much I am involved, [is needed].

What do you like the most about producing?

The freedom. You feel an absence of judgment, an absence of limits. I can spend hours in the studio without eating, without seeing anyone, working with the musicians and the producers, or whoever is there. It feels like anything is possible — not because you know that the process can change suddenly, but because you know that what you produce, maybe you will hear again the next day, and it seems like a disaster, or it could be the best thing in the world.

So I really enjoyed it, knowing that moment was mine and that of those who were there, no one would hear it or give their opinion. Once it's finished, that song is no longer mine; it belongs to everyone. But it is enjoyable to feel that you are jumping into the void and that you are going to fall into the water.

La Cu4rta Hoja was created during your last tour. Has the album inspired you to create new songs?

There are ideas... When I'm on the plane, I spend hours listening to the voice notes on my phone, which are ideas [for] millions of songs I have. I'm in the hotel room, coming from a show or going to a show, and an idea comes to mind, and I record it and then review it. 

Silence is indeed necessary to create. So, I am very focused on giving 100 percent on this tour. There are many trips, many countries. It is the longest, almost the most extended tour we are doing, and then when I return home, and I am in that silence and in that tranquility, everything I am experiencing will explode. There are a lot of emotions and inputs that I'm receiving that I still can't capture because I'm non-stop.

This is the most extensive tour you will do in the United States. What is it like preparing for all those dates? You will go to cities you've never performed in before.

There's a lot of enthusiasm and excitement. We were already in the United States a few years ago, and it was necessary to come back, and the fact that people want it is a gift to me. 

Different things happen at each concert, the repertoire changes, and we let ourselves be carried away by what happens and the place we are in. We also sing versions, maybe a song by a local artist, and in the United States, I'm excited to do some covers of things I already have in mind.

2024 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Full Nominees List

How To Watch The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs Live: Performers Lineup, Nominations, Air Date, Time & More

Image courtesy of the Latin Recording Academy

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How To Watch The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs Live: Performers Lineup, Nominations, Air Date, Time & More

Ahead of the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs on Thursday, Nov. 16, here is a complete guide to the Biggest Night in Latin Music, including all the performers, hosts, presenters and much more.

GRAMMYs/Nov 14, 2023 - 10:15 pm

The Biggest Night in Latin Music is so close we can taste it!

Bearing the full title of the 24th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards, the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs ceremony will be held Thursday, Nov. 16.

Who is nominated for Latin GRAMMYs? Where and when will the 2023 Latin GRAMMY's air? Who will perform during the ceremony? You've got questions, we've got answers!

When Are The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs?

The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs — officially known as the 24th Latin GRAMMY Awards, will be broadcast Thursday, Nov. 16. at 8 p.m. ET (7 p.m. CT).

Where Are The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs Taking Place?

Just like the GRAMMYs, the Latin GRAMMYs are going global. For the first time ever, the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs will be held in Sevilla, Spain, at the and Exhibition Centre (FIBES). This marks the inaugural international telecast in the history of the Latin Recording Academy and its awards show.

Read More: 2023 Latin GRAMMYs To Host First-Ever International Telecast In Sevilla, Spain, On Nov. 16; Nominations To Be Announced Sept. 19

How Can I Watch The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs?

On Nov. 16, the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs will air on Univision, UniMás and Galavisión in the U.S., and at 10:30 p.m. CET on Radiotelevisión Española (RTVE) in Spain. It will also air on cable channel TNT at 19:30 (MEX) / 20:30 (PAN-COL) / 21:30 (VEN) / 22:30 (ARG/CHI).

The ceremony will be aired in more than 80 countries globally. Be sure to check your local broadcasters for further airings.

Those in Brazil can enjoy the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs on the same date, exclusively on Bis and on Globoplay — which will graciously offer the broadcast free to non-subscribers.

Who Is Nominated At The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs?

All manner of leading lights from across the Latin music universe — from Christina Aguilera to Karol G to Rosalía — are nominated at this year's ceremony. For a full list of 2023 Latin GRAMMYs nominees, visit below.

Read More: 2023 Latin GRAMMYs: See The Complete Nominations List

Who Are The Performers At The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs?

Those include the aforementioned Rosalía, as well as Maluma, Natalia Lafourcade, Sebastián Yatra, and many others. For a complete list of performers at the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs, visit below.

Read More: More Performers Added To The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs: Rosalía, Shakira, Maluma, Sebastián Yatra, David Guetta, DJ Premier & More Announced; Anitta, Mon Laferte, Natalia Lafourcade, John Leguizamo & More Join As Presenters

Who Is Hosting The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs?

Latin GRAMMY winner and GRAMMY nominee Sebastián Yatra; Latin GRAMMY nominee and renowned actress Danna Paola; and fellow world-renowned actresses Roselyn Sánchez and Paz Vega will host the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs. For more info, visit below.

Read More: 2023 Latin GRAMMYs Hosts Announced: Sebastián Yatra, Roselyn Sánchez, Danna Paola And Paz Vega

When is The 2023 Latin GRAMMY Premiere?

Prior to the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs, the Latin GRAMMY Premiere will kick off with performances by current Latin GRAMMYs nominees Majo Aguilar, Paula Arenas, Mike Bahía, Vanesa Martín, Elena Rose, Thiaguinho, and Julieta Venegas.

Latin GRAMMY-nominated Brazilian singer Giulia Be and Spanish actor Miguel Ángel Muñoz will host the ceremony. For further information on the 2023 Latin GRAMMY Premiere, check below:

Read More: Performers Announced For The 2023 Latin GRAMMY Premiere: Julieta Venegas, Mike Bahía, Elena Rose, Majo Aguilar, Paula Arenas & More

When Will Latin GRAMMY Week 2023 Take Place And What Are The Events?


Latin GRAMMY In The Schools
: An educational program that helps inform and network music students with Latin music industry pros, and supports music departments that have financial limitations.

Lifetime Achievement & Trustees Special Awards Presentation: Several Latin music icons will be honored. Carmen Linares, Mijares, Arturo Sandoval, Simone, Soda Stereo, and Ana Torroja will receive this year's Lifetime Achievement Award, and Alex Acuña, Gustavo Santaolalla and Wisón Torres will receive the Trustees Award.

Leading Ladies Of Entertainment: This one-of-a-kind event spotlights and elevates the work of professional women in the arts and entertainment fields.

Nominees Reception: This intimate gathering will shine a light on the artists, producers, songwriters, and creators nominated at the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs.

Best New Artist Showcase: This thrilling ceremony helps you get to know the new generation of music creators during Latin GRAMMY Week.

2023 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year Gala: At the Palacio de Congresos y Exposiciones (FIBES), the Latin Recording Academy will host the 2023 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year Gala in honor of multi-hyphenate Laura Pausini.

And, of course, Latin GRAMMY Week will crescendo with the Latin GRAMMYs! For more details, visit below.

Read More: A Guide To Latin GRAMMY Week 2023: Best New Artist Showcase, Latin Recording Academy Person Of The Year Gala, Lifetime Achievement And Trustees Special Awards Presentation & More

What's New At The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs?


There's lots to look forward to! For instance:

These changes illuminate the global expansion of the Latin GRAMMYs and the Latin Recording Academy — not just through the international telecast in Spain, but the addition of the Best Portuguese-Language Urban Music Performance Latin GRAMMY category.

This is crucial for many reasons, chief among them that Portuguese-language music and Brazilian listenerships are a rapidly growing part of the Latin music universe.

In tandem — and as noted — the Latin Recording Academy, Canal Bis, Multishow and Globoplay have announced a three-year agreement to broadcast the annual Latin GRAMMY Awards in Brazil. 

Offerings like the flamenco performance at the Latin GRAMMY Premiere to the Latin GRAMMY sessions flamenco episode underscore the Latin Recording Academy's commitment to digging deep into all corners of the landscape.

As Latin Recording Academy CEO Manuel Abud told RecordingAcademy.com in a 2023 interview, "It is our responsibility as an Academy to really support our artists and our creators in their quest to go global. That's why we're going international, and that's why we're doing it now."

How Can I Learn More About The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs Artwork?

Check out this interview with 2023 Latin GRAMMYs artist Aline Bispo, and click here to learn more about her stunning work for the Latin Recording Academy.

We hope this guide satiates your curiosity about the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs. As always, follow the Latin GRAMMYs/Latin Recording Academy on social media: Facebook, X, Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube.

Use #LatinGRAMMY on all social media platforms to join the social conversation during the Biggest Night in Latin Music — and as the Latin Recording Academy's sister academy, we'll see you there!

2023 Latin GRAMMYs: See The Complete Nominations List

Rewatch The Latin GRAMMY Sessions: Exploring The Soul And Identity Of Flamenco

Image courtesy of the Latin Recording Academy

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Rewatch The Latin GRAMMY Sessions: Exploring The Soul And Identity Of Flamenco

A new audiovisual flamenco piece, tied to the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs, aired Friday, Nov. 10, as part of "The Latin GRAMMY Session" — and if you missed it, or want to revisit it, you can rewatch it below.

GRAMMYs/Nov 13, 2023 - 10:13 pm

Flamenco is an indispensable part of the folkloric tapestry of the global music community And now, you can bask in a tribute to it — Latin GRAMMYs style.

A new audiovisual flamenco piece aired Friday, Nov. 10 at 8 a.m. EST, as part of "The Latin GRAMMY Session." The production showcased the cultural art and identity of Andalucia, while giving viewers a glimpse of the genre’s evolution. This piece was filmed in Grenada, at the UNESCO World Heritage Site and the Hotel Grande Palace.

The sessions dove into the flamenco classics and influence on emerging artists in this generation — while showcasing the architecture, beauty and history of the spaces all under the direction of  Latin GRAMMY winner Javier Limón. 

Featured artists in this session include Latin GRAMMY nominee Carmen Linares, recipient of the 2023 Lifetime Achievement Award, Latin GRAMMY winners Arcángel and Niña Pastori, alongside Lola Indigo, Alana Sinkëy, and Latin GRAMMY nominee Omar Montes, accompanied by dancer Belén López. You can watch the 52-minute presentation below:

Flamenco originated in Spain, where the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs will be held Thursday, Nov. 16, at the Conference and Exhibition Centre (FIBES) in Sevilla, Spain — the first-ever international show in Latin GRAMMY history.

This connects larger Spanish themes and cultural tie-ins to be seen at the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs. For instance, the Spanish cinematic legend, actor Antonio Banderas, will receive the President’s Award from the Latin Recording Academy at the ceremony. More information can be found below:

Read More: Antonio Banderas To Receive The President's Award From The Latin Recording Academy At The 2023 Latin GRAMMYs

In celebration of the International Day of Flamenco, which is also Nov. 16, all five current nominees in the Best Flamenco Album category — Israel Fernández, Diego Guerrero, Omar Montes, Niña Pastori, and Juanfe Pérez — will come together for a special performance at the 2023 Latin GRAMMY Premiere. Delivering a once-in-a-lifetime homage to the genre, the historic musical performance will celebrate both flamenco and its native Spain, which this year hosts the Latin GRAMMY Premiere and the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs.

Keep checking GRAMMY.com for more information ahead of the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs on Thursday — and don’t hesitate to visit LatinGRAMMY.com as well.

2023 Latin GRAMMYs: See The Complete Nominations List