meta-script7 Latin DJs To Watch In 2023: Gordo, Arca, The Martinez Brothers & More | GRAMMY.com
7 Latin DJs To Watch In 2023: Gordo, Arca, The Martinez Brothers & More
Venezuelan musician Alejandra Ghersi Rodríguez a.k.a. Arca

Photo: Tomas Tkacik/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

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7 Latin DJs To Watch In 2023: Gordo, Arca, The Martinez Brothers & More

EDM is more embedded in Latin music than ever before — and vice versa. Meet seven artists whose work is on the cutting edge of electronic and Latin music.

GRAMMYs/Sep 27, 2023 - 01:18 pm

Latin-infused dance music has started making waves around the world, bringing the musical subculture of Latin EDM into the mainstream. In the past few years, Latin acts in the U.S., Spain, and Latin America are remixing the sound of music in Spanish, creating hits like Farruko's "Pepas" and Bizarrap's "BZRP Music Sessions No. 52" with Quevedo.

Latin EDM first received a global boost in 2019 thanks to the Colombian guaracha of Víctor Cárdenas, who scored a No. 1 on Billboard's Dance Club Songs chart with "Baila Conmigo" after Jennifer Lopez covered it. Cárdenas then went on to produce Farruko's Hot Dance/Electronic Songs chart-topper "Pepas." Argentine producer Bizarrap soon followed in his footsteps with his viral BZRP Music Sessions on YouTube. He has seamlessly blended trap, reggaetón, and regional Mexican music with electronica in his recent hit collaborations with Shakira, Peso Pluma, and Villano Antillano.

EDM is more embedded in Latin music than ever before. Puerto Rican producers Tainy and Caleb Calloway have pushed reggaetón music into the future by putting elements of house music hits by Bad Bunny and Rauw Alejandro. Latin EDM is also permeating pop music: Dominican producer Kelman Duran worked on Beyoncé's Renaissance, which won the GRAMMY Award for Best Dance/Electronic Album. He added a bit of reggaetón bounce to her swaggering song "I’m That Girl." 

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, GRAMMY.com is putting the spotlight on seven Latin EDM acts.

Sinego

Hailing from Bogotá, Colombia, Sinego first made waves thanks to his house bolero songs. He breathed new life in the age-old Latin sound in his songs like "Verte Triste" and "No Soy De Aquí." Sinego has received co-signs from and worked with acts like Sofi Tukker and Bomba Estéreo.

Sinego is looking to push Latin EDM even further with his upcoming album Alterego, which will be released on Oct. 27. He traveled throughout Latin American and Spain to collaborate with local musicians. In addition to bolero, Sinego reimagines genres like cumbia, samba, tango, and mambo through house music. There will also be a “Noche” version of the LP that will explore techno influences.

"'Alterego' is more than just an album; it's a sonic journey that transcends borders and genres, weaving together the rich tapestry of Latin American musical traditions with the limitless possibilities of electronic music," he tells GRAMMY.com.

Gordo

Gordo is making waves in EDM in both the English and Spanish markets, bridging the gap between Latin artists and electronic music. After a decade in the game, the Guatemalan American producer was tapped by Drake last year to work on his album Honestly, Nevermind. Gordo helped the Canadian superstar get into the house groove in songs like "Massive" and "Sticky."

In his own singles, Gordo is returning Spanish tech house to its Latin roots. Last year, he teamed up with rising Colombian star Feid for the alluring "Hombres y Mujeres," combining reggaetón with booming house beats. Colombian superstar Maluma later teamed up with Gordo for the pulsating "Parcera." 

"What I want people to take away the most from the Feid song is that I did it and I’m Hispanic," he told Uproxx last year. "There’s so much [Hispanic] talent, so why not keep it all in the family?”

Arca

Arca has broken boundaries for Latin artists in EDM. She has especially pushed the envelope for the LGBTQIA+ community as a trans and non-binary artist in the genre. Thanks to her Kick album series, Arca has been nominated at both the GRAMMY and Latin GRAMMY Awards.

Throughout the Kick albums, Arca has proudly explored her Latina roots in her genre-bending club bangers. In 2020, she teamed up with Spanish pop star Rosalía for the freaky "KLK," which blended glitchy reggaetón beats with flourishes of traditional Venezuelan gaita music. A year later, Lady Gaga tapped Arca for a remix of "Rain On Me." Arca transformed the song with a sample of the raptor house classic "Metelo Sacalo" by Venezuela's DJ Yirvin. 

"Part of the lifeblood that has nurtured me was music that I heard on the radio," Arca told GRAMMY.com in 2021 about her reggaetón influences. "Music that reached me, through not just academic and performance, in more of a popular sense."

Deorro

Deorro is seamlessly blending his bicultural roots in his music. The Mexican American DJ and producer has toured the world and performed at all the major music festivals like Tomorrowland, Coachella, and Lollapalooza. In his sets, Deorreo often mixes in Mexican classics like "La Chona" by Norteño band Los Tucanes de Tijuana.

Last year, Deorro released Orro, further embracing his Latinx roots. He put a house music spin on regional Mexican music in songs like "Yo Las Pongo" with Los Tucanes de Tijuana and Dime with cumbia group Los Ángeles Azules. At EDC Las Vegas in May, Deorro brought out Eslabon Armado as a surprise guest. The Mexican American band joined him to perform his remix of the global hit "Ella Baila Sola" featuring Peso Pluma. 

"One of the most important things about collaborating with other artists is that it opens a lot of avenues for both me and other artists," he told iEDM.com earlier this year. "It's so inspiring to [...] evolve new sounds with them."

Martox

The Dominican duo of producer Eduardo Baldera and singer Juan Martínez are showing a different side to music from the Caribbean. Since their 2019 debut, Martox has experimented with multiple genres, but they have really hit their stride in dance music.

An alternative act with R&B and pop-flavored tracks, Martoz have started adding elements of electronica to the mix in the Se Siente Diferente EP. The title translates to "It Feels Different" and Martox lived up to that with the tropical house of "No Es Normal" and the disco-influenced "Pausa" with Gian Rojas. The sunny "Solsticio" best reflects where Martox is at now with feel-good funk colliding with the Dominican soul in Martínez's voice. 

"All the elements [of 'Solsticio'] groove perfectly," Martox tells GRAMMY.com "Everything stays constant and familiar, while at the same time, the track evolves and keeps things interesting and fresh."

The Martinez Brothers

Born Chris and Steve Martinez, the Martinez Brothers grew up on dance music in the Bronx. The Puerto Rican duo started incorporating their Latinx roots into their club bangers.

The Martinez Brothers helped usher in reggaetón's house music era in 2020 when they collaborated with Rauw Alejandro and Mr. Naisgai in the genre-bending "Química." Since then, they have continued to bring Latin acts into their world, including Fuego and Dominican star Tokischa. She featured on the intoxicating house track "Kilo." Alongside Gordo, the duo recently tapped into the world of Afrobeats with Nigerian star Rema in "Rizzla."

"Black people and Latinos really created this music," Steve Martinez told mitú in 2021. "It comes from the inner cities of New York and Chicago from Black and Latino communities. That’s always something we try to bring forth in our music."

2DEEP

2DEEP is representing his Latinx roots in his music. Hailing from the Bronx, the DJ and producer of Ecuadorian and Colombian descent immerses his EDM in elements of reggaetón and guaracha.

2DEEP previously distributed his music through Mad Decent where he also collaborated with Diplo. In 2019, he signed with Steve Aoki's Latin label Dim Mak En Fuego. Since then, 2DEEP has combined his love of dance music with Colombian guaracha, which is a Latin take on tribal house music. He also launched the dance party Reggaetonlandia that hosts events across the west coast. 2DEEP often spins his hits like "Guaracha En Reggaetonlandia" and "Takataka" in perreo-ready sets. 

"In the world of EDM, there aren't many Latinos like me and I want to make sure that every kid like me knows that their dreams can come true," he told People last year. 

2023 Latin GRAMMYs: See The Complete Nominations List

Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: Arca Is Expanding Latin Music On Her Terms With Electronic Album ‘KiCK i’

Arca 

Photo: Hart Lëshkina

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Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: Arca Is Expanding Latin Music On Her Terms With Electronic Album ‘KiCK i’

Electronic artist Arca's poppiest album yet, 'KiCK i,' expands Latin music outside its traditional boundaries—and now she has a GRAMMY nomination for it

GRAMMYs/Feb 18, 2021 - 03:34 am

Last year saw the demise and birth of many worlds. But despite the upheaval, Alejandra Ghersi, the avant-garde electronic music artist known as Arca, streamlined her approach and delivered her most palatable album yet, KiCK i.

Fans of the singer/songwriter and producer know her for her boundless, experimental approach to music-making. Her textured sound design includes instrumentals, futuristic effects and haunting, ceremonial vocals. KiCK i, released June of 2020, is an out-of-this-world bilingual sonic experience that marries the two sounds that raised her: electronic music and reggaeton.

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To the Barcelona-based, Venezuelan-born artist, reggaeton and electronic music are one and the same. Reggaeton relies "on the loop of electronic instrumentation," she explains via Zoom. With this album, Arca is taking Latin music’s biggest sound to new dimensions outside of the traditional Latin music world.

The intent is GRAMMY-worthy. KiCK i is nominated for Best Dance/Electronic Album at the 2021 GRAMMY Awards. And it has a place on the dancefloor—hip-shaking tracks like "KLK" with Spanish sensation Rosalía and Venezuela’s Cardopusher are pop songs at their core even as Arca maintains her experimental vision. 

The album's 12 songs mix reggaeton’s infectious rhythms with heavy, emotive synth sounds and robotic vocals. And the complex themes of identity in tracks like "Nonbinary" and "Machote" are as relevant and cutting-edge as the sound itself. She’s known for her contradictory nature—when asked about the songs, she responds, "There are times where it feels pleasurable and right to indulge in the binary, and there are times where it feels pleasurable and right to indulge in not having to put everything into one of those two boxes."

Recently, Arca spoke with GRAMMY.com about how her transition influenced the expansion of her sound on KiCK i, working with the late singer/producer Sophie on the album and creating reggaeton with Rosalía.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

What about the creative process or the creating process gets you excited?

It tends to be the part of making a song or being on set where I'm not in control of what the outcome will be. My favorite part of making something is not necessarily the part that entails having a vision and figuring out how to execute it, but rather the element of surprise that emerges when there's maybe a beautiful mistake or an accidental discovery.

So you don't mind not being in control?

Oh, I crave that. I think in my day-to-day, I want to be in control of my feelings or my practice. 

What drew you to electronic music?

I have a brother seven years older, and I would often borrow his music—sometimes without permission. I think his musical tastes left a big influence on me. He had a lot of Aphex Twin, Squarepusher. He had a few Björk records that were very formative in my musical heritage [and] instruction. 

Also, I loved electronic music on the radio. Pretty much all the musical genres that I gravitated to when I was a kid were electronic in some way—even if it was like future-leaning R&B. There was [also always] reggaeton on the radio in Venezuela. I considered reggaeton electronic music.

That’s interesting. Tell me more.

It really does rely on the loop of electronic instrumentation.

Before I come back to that thought, I want to get into your music. Your last album, Arca, was experimental. KiCK i is a bit more pop. How did that shift happen?
I can't answer that without mentioning the beginning of my transition. I think the self-titled record was more of like a swan song, as if I was letting go or mourning. When I wrote that record, I was walking in a cemetery every day by my house. It was pretty goth. Beyond emo. After that, I came to terms with a few things and decided to share them with the world.

The immediate result was something more celebrational. I didn't really want to preach to the choir, so to speak. There was a focused intention to try to reach people that might not share the same views as me—but to entice them or invite them by making something beautiful enough or entertaining enough that would compel people to think about the fact that we're each kind of mutants in our own way.

At the same time, we're all brought together in being unique. I don't know how to explain it. I think it's something that's more a result of living and finding a queer family after I left Venezuela when I was 17 years old. The values and the ways of making a new family or finding yourself to be part of a community that you didn't realize existed, it all ties into the reasons why the record sounds so different.

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You mentioned people who have different values than you, and then you cited queerness. Is that what you mean by people who have different views?

Definitely, but only because I think everyone is queer. You can self-identify as queer or not, but I think we're all on a spectrum.I don't think it should be something exclusive. It should be something inclusive. I think also each individual has multiple souls. That's something that I talked about a lot on Kick I—that we all have more than one state. 

I want to make space for each of those to be able to coexist in the same space, not just tolerate each other, but in a harmonious way. I think queerness isn't something that should make anyone feel like an outsider. If anything, it should make everyone feel like part of the same thing.

You have a song called "Nonbinary," but you also have a song called "Machote," which means "man" in Spanish. Why did you decide to name the songs that?

I didn't want to force people into thinking that by being non-binary, you're renouncing the heritage and tradition of these charges between masculinity and femininity. If anything, I wanted each woman to recognize the man inside them and each man to recognize the woman inside them. The words "woman" [and] "man" mean different things to each person.

My idea was that you can know who you are without needing to only choose one side of you. It's like the sun and the moon. I want it to have the pleasure and the joy and the sparks that can fly off of the tension between hyper-masculinity and hyper-femininity in the case of "Machote."

At the same time, there are instances where thinking in terms of masculinity and femininity as a binary might not be useful. I was trying to have my cake and eat it too. There are times where it feels pleasurable and right to indulge in the binary, and there are times where it feels pleasurable and right to indulge in not having to put everything into one of those two boxes.

It was a very nuanced message and a layered one that I understood was contradictory upon the moment of sharing it. That was kind of the point.

How did reggaeton and trap make it into the album?

Part of the lifeblood that has nurtured me was music that I heard on the radio. Music that reached me, through not just academic and performance, in more of a popular sense. One of the contradictions I like to relish in is to not think of my practice as academic, but also not to think of it as just entertainment.

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Did you plan on making the track of the Rosalía reggaeton since the beginning?

No. Actually, that's not the first song that we've made together. It just happened to be the first song we've been able to share. I'm glad that ["KLK" is] the first one because I'm really proud of it. I hope the other ones make it too, but at the same time, I don't think that our sound has to be shared with an audience for it to be real or for it to mean something.

I'm happy that we've made songs. Whether or not they see the light of day and are shared with audiences is secondary, almost, but I love her so much.

What about the song makes you proud of it?

I want to mention Cardopusher. It was between the three of us that the song came to be. So, I want to do more than a shout-out. I think the lifeblood of that song, the melody that is very hypnotic and has given the song so much of its energy was Cardopusher’s musicality. It's not just Rosalía. It's Rosalía, Cardopusher and I.

It's very important because the collaboration feels like a triangle. I've known him since I was, like, 14 years old. He was and is a local hero in the scene of Caracas. So, I'm proud for, I guess, being a bridge too, between Cardopusher and Rosalía. I'm proud to be a part of that song.

I'm proud because those are the rhythms that Luis and I grew up with, and I know Rosalía really appreciates them too. I love the song because I think it's infectious, but not 100 percent digestible in a pleasant way.

I have noticed that about your music. Some things about it are more poppy and accessible than others. Are you ever concerned about it not being palatable enough for broader audiences?
All the time. It's my nightmare to think that I might make something that means much more to me than it could mean to an audience. I always want to make it possible for people to have their own reading of things without making it sound too abstract. That's something I find myself never figuring out.

Your music is at the intersection of so many things. You're creating a new space for Latinx music outside its traditional boundaries. Do you think so too?

That's the goal. I don't know if I can answer that. I think that's for other Latinx musicians to answer, but that is honestly the goal.
And I think that your music is necessary for that—to push those audiences.

Bless you, for saying so. Thank you.

On the album, you worked with Sophie as well. What did working with Sophie mean to you?

It meant a lot. It's an emotional subject because it's very recent that she passed, and I find myself still processing the emotional side of that. What I can say right now, honestly, that I feel nothing short of an honor to have been able to make music with her and have that connection and be a part of my life for many years.

We met each other before either of us transitioned, so there was this very profound parallel and also similarities and also contrasts. I think Sophie is a genius. Period. She will forever remain someone that inspires me. We had so many plans. We were making so many plans to tour together. 

The track with Sophie, "La Chiqui," is more experimental than some of the others. What do you enjoy about playing with sounds?
I like the idea of combining things that haven’t been combined: languages, good print, times, different eras, different materials, even fantasy worlds, like science fiction versus fantasy. Maybe even interpreting traditional things with more contemporary leanings, or interpreting more contemporary ideas through traditional classical beauty.

I try to find combinations that surprise me and hopefully can produce a sense of wonder. Or, at least, inspiration.

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This album is nominated for a GRAMMY. How do you feel about that?
I’m still pinching myself. I can't say that I've taken it all in. Interviews like this one are what help it feel more real because I didn't even know that was possible.

When the label mentioned that it was nominated, I wasn't even told that it was a possible candidate. It's a great honor because I've studied not just music, but the history of recorded music. The GRAMMYs are very much about albums, which is a format that I'll always believe in. And then to have the recognition and the honor of it being nominated for me is already more than enough. It just gives me a lot of fuel to keep doing what I'm doing as best as I can.

Outside of your music, what do you want to be known for?
That’s a big question. I want to be known for not ever fully being known. I'd like to remain something of a mystery. I'd like to make it so that if you study my tracks, or the gestures, or the decisions that I took throughout the course of my career as a musician or as an artist working in more than one medium, it would be to make it hard for people to reverse-engineer and figure out who I was without hiding from people.

To find this place where people can feel like they don't have to know exactly who I was in order for my work to mean something to them—that would make me happy.

Find Out Who Has The Most GRAMMY Nominations, Which Categories Are All-Female & More: 2021 GRAMMYs By The Numbers

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Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage/Getty Images

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Find Out Who Has The Most GRAMMY Nominations, Which Categories Are All-Female & More: 2021 GRAMMYs By The Numbers

For the first time in the history of the GRAMMY Awards, every nominee for Best Rock Performance and Best Country Album is a woman or a group fronted by a woman

GRAMMYs/Nov 25, 2020 - 12:01 am

Now that the 2021 GRAMMY nominees have been revealed, let's take a look deeper across the categories to see which artists fared the best, who some of the first-time nominees are, who made history and more.

Beyoncé leads the pack this year with nine nominations, followed by Dua Lipa, Roddy Ricch and Taylor Swift, all tied at six nods. Brittany Howard follows with five nominations, with Megan Thee Stallion, Billie Eilish, DaBaby, Phoebe Bridgers, Justin Bieber, John Beasley and David Frost all tied with four nods.

As for Queen Bey, her nine 63rd GRAMMY Awards nods bring her total number of career nominations to 79, making her the most-nominated female in GRAMMY history. She is now tied with Paul McCartney as the second most-nominated artist of all time, only behind her husband JAY-Z (who received three nods himself this year) and legendary producer Quincy Jones, who both have 80 career nominations.

The pop/R&B icon has won 24 GRAMMYs to date, and if she wins at least four of her nine nominations, she will become the female artist with the most GRAMMY wins. If she wins eight or nine, she will be the highest number of GRAMMY wins of all time.

Inside The Song Of The Year Nominees | 2021 GRAMMY Awards

Both Stallion and Bridgers are first-time GRAMMY nominees and are in the running for Best New Artist. The Houston rapper's other three nominations come from her "Savage Remix" featuring Beyoncé, which is up for Record Of The Year, Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song. The Los Angeles alt-rocker's other nods are for her sophomore solo album, Punisher, which is up for Best Alternative Music Album, and its second single "Kyoto," up for Best Rock Performance and Best Rock Song.

Notably, all nominees in the Best New Artist category are female and/or people of color—Stallion and Bridgers' fellow talented contenders are Ingrid Andress, Chika, Noah Cyrus, D Smoke, Doja Cat and KAYTRANADA. All of them are also first-time nominees.

Explore This Year's Album Of The Year Nominees | 2021 GRAMMYs

Other 2021 first-time nominees include BTS, Harry Styles, the Strokes, Poppy, Jayda G, Arca, Baauer, Madeon and Toro Y Moi, the latter five who are nominated in the dance/electronic categories.

For the first time in the history of the GRAMMY Awards, every nominee for both Best Rock Performance and Best Country Album is a woman or a group fronted by a woman. The nominees for the former are Andress, Brandy Clark, Miranda Lambert, Ashley McBryde and the group Little Big Town. For Best Rock Performance, the contenders are Fiona Apple, Bridgers, Brittany Howard, Grace Potter, sister trio HAIM and group Big Thief.

More entries than ever before were submitted for 2021 GRAMMY consideration, totaling 23,207.

Stay tuned to GRAMMY.com and our social channels (Twitter, Facebook and Instagram) for more 2021 GRAMMYs content, and tune in to the 63rd GRAMMY Awards on Sunday, March 14, on CBS to find out who the winners will be!

2021 GRAMMYs: Complete Nominees List

Sónar 2020 Lineup: The Chemical Brothers, Channel Tres, James Murphy, Eric Prydz, Jayda G, Mura Masa & More

Channel Tres

Photo: Scott Dudelson/Getty Images

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Sónar 2020 Lineup: The Chemical Brothers, Channel Tres, James Murphy, Eric Prydz, Jayda G, Mura Masa & More

The "music, creativity & technology" festival returns with its flagship Barcelona event June 18–20

GRAMMYs/Jan 17, 2020 - 02:55 am

In contrast to the all the colorful music fest lineups with big-font headliners we've seen over the past few weeks, Sónar just dropped a beige, all-lowercase, one-font-size lineup for their June 2020 Barcelona event. Despite the simple layout, the list is filled with an epic artist offering, including The Chemical Brothers, along with rising rapper/producer/dance hero Channel Tres, LCD Soundsystem frontman James Murphy, '00-and-beyond house & techno innovator Eric Prydz, environmental scientist/disco queen Jayda G, "Love$ick" producer Mura Masa and many more.

Read: Channel Tres Talks Honoring Isaac Hayes On EP 'Black Moses,' Healing With Music & Being A "Ghetto Savior"

The "music, creativity & technology" festival returns with its flagship Barcelona event on June 18–20. Oft Björk-collaborator Arca, emerging French producer/director duo THE BLAZE, along with worldwide house and techno legends The Black Madonna, Charlotte de Witte, Carl Cox, Richie Hawtin and Laurent Garnier, will also perform.

According to Sónar, current 2020 GRAMMY nominees The Chemical Brothers will be making the Spanish debut of their acclaimed live show, which they toured in 2019 alongside the release of their GRAMMY-nominated No Geography. THE BLAZE will be performing their only live show of 2020 at the fest. Both acts are a great representation of artists celebrated by Sónar—cinematic, unexpected electronic music elevated by the stunning visuals/technology of their live shows.

While Sónar is beloved for their expert curation from within the eclectic electronic music rainbow, they also celebrate left-of-center acts in other areas, particularly in the hip-hop. Channel Tres, whose self-made beats are infused with '90s G-funk, is an artist whose music lives within both worlds. Afro-Latina rapper Princess Nokia, who marks her return to the fest this year, also uses the medium of rapping to incorporate and celebrate diverse sounds and identities within her music.

Related: Princess Nokia Is Making Space For People Who "Don't Have A Voice Yet" In Music

U.K. rappers Dave, AJ Tracey, Headie One and Conducta, will bring Britain's prevalent trap Grime and drill sounds to the iconic festival. The newer SonarXS stage grows this year as it "expands its mission as a springboard for local and international talent from the fringes." Now in its fourth year, the newly revamped stage "presents Spanish trap and reggaeton from Morad, Afrojuice195 and Miss Nina, as well as unclassifiable strains of street derived music from the likes of Chenta Tsai - Baobae, Califato ¾ or Kaydy Cain."

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Tickets are on sale now; visit Sónar's website for more info as well as the complete lineup.

Primavera Sound 2020 Lineup: Bad Bunny, Beck, Kacey Musgraves, Tyler, The Creator & More

Ultra Miami 2020 RESISTANCE Lineup: Maceo Plex B2B Carl Cox, Amelie Lens, ANNA, Dubfire, Richie Hawtin & More

Maceo Plex B2B Carl Cox at RESISTANCE Ibiza 2018

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Ultra Miami 2020 RESISTANCE Lineup: Maceo Plex B2B Carl Cox, Amelie Lens, ANNA, Dubfire, Richie Hawtin & More

Ultra Music Fest's dark and moody house-techno offering is preparing for another lit year, with The Martinez Brothers, CamelPhat, Cirez D, Nicole Moudaber, Tale Of Us and many others also slated to throw down

GRAMMYs/Dec 20, 2019 - 06:29 am

Today, Ultra Music Festival revealed more exciting details for its upcoming 2020 flagship Miami event: the phase one lineup for its darker house and techno RESISTANCE offerings. Longtime underground icon Carl Cox will be performing three times, including a first-time B3B set with The Martinez Brothers and Jamie Jones, as well a B2B with "Mutant Disco" king Maceo Plex; their first North American joint DJ set.

Drumcode founder Adam Beyer and Cirez D, the darker techno alias of Eric Prydz, are also slated to bring the B2B fire to RESISTANCE Miami 2020. Also on deck for collab sets are GRAMMY-winning house legend Dubfire, rising techno queen Nicole Moudaber and longtime Spanish club staple Paco Osuna. Another Spanish legend, Dennis Cruz will pair up with rising U.K. act Michael Bibi to represent European tech-house.

Techno heavy-hitters Richie Hawtin, Tale Of Us, Amelie Lens, ANNA and Pan-Pot will also bring their explosive, warehouse-filling DJ sets to RESISTANCE. On the more housey side of electronic music rainbow, the lineup features past GRAMMY-nominees CamelPhat, along with Ukranian duo ARTBAT, British pair Gorgon City, Manchester duo Solardo and Tunisia's Dice Corleone a.k.a. Loco Dice.

Read: Bye Bye Plastic: BLOND:ISH, Annie Mac, Eats Everything & More Advocate For Eco-Friendly Parties

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Previously announced Ultra Miami acts include Gesaffelstein, GRAMMY winners Flume and Zedd, past GRAMMY nominees Above & Beyond and Armin Van Buuren, and many more. Additional acts will continue to be revealed for both the main Ultra stages as well as RESISTANCE as the festival approaches, with a handful of major surprises being unleashed at the event itself (Swedish House Mafia famously surprise-reunited after a five-year break at Ultra 2018).

The 22nd edition of the beloved electronic music festival will return to its longtime home at Bayfront Park, after changing locations in 2019, March 20-22, 2020. This year's event saw a much-buzzed-about second iteration of RESISTANCE at the fest, after the Ultra united their growing house and techno offerings as RESISTANCE in 2018 and brought many of the DJs on this year's lineup to Ibiza and other hotspots over the past few years. (You can check out Maceo Plex and Carl Cox's epic 2018 RESISTANCE Ibiza B2B in the above video.)

Tickets for Ultra Miami are on sale now; visit their website for more info and the complete phase one lineup.

Gershon Kingsley, Electronic Music Pioneer And Composer, Dies at 97