meta-scriptInside The Recording Academy And Clive Davis' 2024 Pre-GRAMMY Gala: New Artists, Lasting Legends and Iconic Performances | GRAMMY.com
(L-R) Sabrina Carpenter, Ice Spice, Lana Del Rey and Jack Antonoff attend the 2024 Pre-GRAMMY Gala, presented by the Recording Academy and Clive Davis.
(L-R) Sabrina Carpenter, Ice Spice, Lana Del Rey and Jack Antonoff attend the 2024 Pre-GRAMMY Gala, presented by the Recording Academy and Clive Davis.

Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

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Inside The Recording Academy And Clive Davis' 2024 Pre-GRAMMY Gala: New Artists, Lasting Legends and Iconic Performances

Ahead of the 2024 GRAMMYs, stars including Mariah Carey, Lenny Kravitz, Megan Thee Stallion, Chloe x Halle, and more flocked to the annual Pre-GRAMMY Gala co-presented by the Recording Academy.

GRAMMYs/Feb 6, 2024 - 10:20 pm

Who better than Tom Hanks to say it best?

"Clive Davis has provided us with the soundtrack of our lives, our emotions and our inspirations," the legendary actor said of the night's premiement host; the legendary music executive, passionate advocate for the power of song and noted discoverer of artists. 

"Music is the food [of the soul], give us excess of it," said Hanks in his passionate opening soliloquy packed with approbation. "And tonight is a night of excess."

It's the stuff of legend, a topic of lore and an evening that regularly rockets itself in the pages of music history. For nearly 50 years, the annual Pre-GRAMMY Gala, presented by the Recording Academy and Clive Davis, has been a star-making opportunity for the music industry to celebrate their past monumental year, highlighting both veteran acts and tomorrow's superstars. For the 2024 Pre-GRAMMY Galasponsored by Hilton, IBM and Mastercard and held on a rainy night at its regular home at the equally iconic Beverly Hilton Hotel the night before the 2024 GRAMMYs, its usual slot on the calendar — the grand master of music's party continued to provide a beacon of light for jaw-dropping performances and starry shoulder-rubbing. 

But before the party is the cocktail hour; a curious affair where music past and present collides. In one corner finds Producer Of The Year nominee Dan Nigro, the pop whisperer behind acclaimed acts ranging from Chappell Roan, Conan Gray and the multiple-Grammy nominated Olivia Rodrigo. A couple people away was Frankie Valli, last year's Pre-GRAMMY Gala opener who is currently in the midst of what he bills as a farewell tour. Looking around the room, the star power is abundant: Dianne Warren, the aforementioned Hanks with wife Rita Wilson, MusiCares' 2024 Person Of The Year Jon Bon Jovi, longtime Gala guest Nancy Pelosi alongside husband Paul. 

Just beyond the cocktail hour lies the red carpet, which boasts a head-snapping array of personalities. Megan Thee Stallion strutted in flaunting a gold-colored dress, while last year's Best New Artist winner Samara Joy sauntered in an equally dazzling gown. The list of guests includes an eclectic array of who's who in music: pop star Ellie Goulding, the dance-pop-country artist and producer Diplo, country-pop icon Shania Twain, recent Black Music Collective honorees Mariah Carey and Lenny Kravitz, the producer David Foster with wife Katherine McPhee, eventual three-time GRAMMY winners Julien Baker, Lucy Dacus, and Phoebe Bridgers (the trio otherwise known as Boygenius), and the following night's GRAMMY opener Dua Lipa, among countless others.

As the esteemed guests (which also included Kenneth "Babyface" EdmundsJanelle Monáe, Troye Sivan, Motown founder Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson, the members of Earth, Wind and Fire and Charli XCX) settled into their seats in a ballroom with a stage outfitted with the bash's signature twinkle lights sparkling on the stage, a countdown on the monitors appeared. 3, 2, 1…

"We're going to play a game of word association," said Hanks, who was bestowed the honor of introducing Davis and to mark the occasion, he managed to recite a massive list of artists Davis had a hand or hands in making superstars, from Janis Joplin to Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, right up to Whitney Houston and Alicia Keys. "The only reason why Mozart, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky weren't mentioned is because they all died before Clive Davis had a chance to introduce them," he joked.

"I've gotta tell you, the emotions run high," said Davis. "I look out among you and I see so many familiar faces. The whole thing began as long ago as 1976 and I really have to pinch myself that it's going so, so strong. I'm happy to say that music is alive and well."

Tennis great Serena Williams introduced the night's opening act, Green Day. "In 2022, Clive Davis and I were honored together when we were inducted into the National Portrait Gallery," she recalled. "I said to him, 'You've got to remember to invite me to your gala. I'm so thrilled to be back here to introduce my favorite band. To know me is to know my love for them."

The punk gods are currently making a comeback with their 14th studio album, Saviors, and celebrating the 30th anniversary of their breakout album Dookie and 20th anniversary of their massively successful LP American Idiot. The group honored both anniversaries with a song from each, "American Idiot" and "Basket Case."

In years past, the night's performers ranged a wide gamut; but to prove Davis's point and regenerative effects of the industry, this year a large portion of the roster of surprise performers were plucked from the 2024's crop of Best New Artist nominees. There was the singer-songwriter Noah Kahan, who busted out a rousing rendition of his own breakout "Stick Season," while Ice Spice hit the stage to deliver her 2023 solo hit, "Deli." 

Rising country star Jelly Roll was also bequeathed a coveted slot, proclaiming his excitement by saying he had "only read about the party in books and magazines." With that, he delivered rousing versions of his candid single "Need a Favor" backed by a choir, as well as his equally affecting "Save Me," on which he brought out duet partner and eventual GRAMMY winner Lainey Wilson.

In fact, it was Wilson who provided one of the most surprising moments of the night when she appeared to perform a special version of Barbie's "I'm Just Ken" accompanied by songwriter Andrew Watt on piano and Mark Ronson on guitar. Of course, Davis was the architect of the moment, an idea he said came to him last week; Ronson suggested Wilson after the song's original performer, the actor Ryan Gosling, was unavailable. 

"To look astound and to see some of the greatest musicians and record-makers, it's really an honor to be here," Ronson said. "This is a song we wrote for the movie Barbie about the beauty of being the runner-up sometimes, which is a lesson I know very well," he said to laughter. "It's pretty cool to be second sometimes."

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Fresh off his starring role on Broadway's Sweeney Todd, Josh Groban delivered a subtle tribute to the legend behind the Broadway musical by performing "Children Will Listen," before paying tribute to Davis himself with a gospel-tinged performance of Simon and Garfunkel's "Bridge Over Troubled Water," which Davis had a hand in releasing. Joining him was another Best New Artist nominee, The War and Treaty frontman Michael Trotter Jr., and the pair's joint vocal power brought the audience to its feet. 

Musical whiplash ensued with additional performances courtesy Maluma and Isley Brothers, the latter of which performed their instantly-recognizable "Shout" as a tribute to Chairman and CEO of SONY Music Publishing Jon Platt, the evening's Icon honoree. An award which in years past has gone to heavyweights including David Geffen, Mo Ostin, Ahmet Ertgun and Jerry Moss to name a few, Platt was touched by the honor and delivered a 40-minute speech chock full of stories and reflections. Not even a beeping fire alarm, which at one point blared and flashed through his speech, tripped up Platt.

"It's funny because Harvey called me and I thought he needed help with something," said Platt, recalling the moment the Recording Academy's CEO Harvey Mason jr. informed him of the honor. "But he said I was selected as this year's industry icon and I was like, 'Wow, man.'" 

Noting he needed convincing to accept the honor ("I'm [just] seeing so many other people doing great things," he relented), Platt's contributions to music, from his work with everyone from Isley Brothers to Beyonce to Jay-Z, and even Oliva Rodrigo, makes him both a genre and decade-spanning force. 

"You'll see a consistent thing with me is that I'm a music nerd-fanboy," Platt said, noting how a kind word from the composer Gerald Busby made this evening a full circle moment for him. "[One day in 1998] I saw him and we were making small talk and he said, 'Someone was asking me who I see in the industry today that can achieve the things that I can achieve. I told them that Big Jon's gonna run the whole thing one day.' For someone to share the belief they have in you is incredibly powerful. From that day, I changed the course of my focus. Everything had a purpose after that."

Another one of the artists Platt fostered performed in his honor as well: Public Enemy. "We're here for you and here for all of our heroes and hero-ettes," Chuck D declared before the group dove into an energetic medley of "Can't Truss It," "Bring the Noise" and "Fight the Power." 

It wouldn't be a Clive Davis bash without one final surprise. As 1 a.m. neared, Gladys Knight and Dionne Warwick hit the stage, with the former belting out a passionate version of "(The Way We Were) Memories" and the duo joining together for Warwick's endearing staple, "That's What Friends are For" alongside Andra Day. 

But from the electrified crowd, guest Stevie Wonder just couldn't help himself, getting up on stage to assist on harmonica. "This has been such a wonderful blessing to meet all of these people in my life; to meet Dionne, to meet Gladys," Wonder said, cueing up an unrehearsed and on-the-fly version of "What the World Needs Now Is Love" with the entire group. 

"I know this is what we need in the world," he continued. "There are many people that for so many years have been dividing people, not understanding the purpose that God has given us to come together."

It was a moving way to wrap up the night — and a fitting one at that, bringing together stars young and old to offer an inspiring message, and remind just how powerful music can be.

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Megan Thee Stallion
Megan Thee Stallion performing in 2024

Photo: Steve Jennings/Getty Images

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Everything We Know About Megan Thee Stallion's New Album 'Megan': Cover, Release Date & More

Three-time GRAMMY winner Megan Thee Stallion is about to unleash her follow-up to 2022's 'Traumazine,' simply titled 'Megan.' Here's all the details we know about the album so far.

GRAMMYs/Jun 5, 2024 - 08:46 pm

In 2022, Megan Thee Stallion gave fans her most visceral self-inventory to date with Traumazine. Now, we're poised to learn even more about Megan.

That's the apt title of the firebrand rapper's next album, announced during the first of Atlanta stops on her Hot Girl Summer Tour on June 2. Speaking to Women's Health last spring, she declared Megan — whose title hadn't been revealed at the time — to be her most realized work to date. As she explained, the motif of Megan is an ancient and nigh-universal one: the snake.

"I was inspired to create this album about rebirth because I feel I am becoming a new person physically and mentally," she stated, amid descriptions of her heightened wellness practices. "[Snakes are] feared, misunderstood, respected, healing." And in a teaser, she poignantly proclaimed "Just as a snake sheds it skin, we must shed our past, over and over again."

We're still early in the rollout process — but regardless, here's what GRAMMY.com could dredge up about Megan as of press time.

It's Her First Independent Release

In 2023, Megan Thee Stallion exited 1501 Certified Entertainment, her formal label — the culmination of a hairy legal dispute.

While her distribution deal with 300 Entertainment, owned by Warner Music Group, remains, Megan will be released under the rapper's own independent music and entertainment company, Hot Girl Productions.

She's Dropped Three Serpentine Singles

True to her snake motif, Megan Thee Stallion has released three slithering bangers from Megan.

In November 2023, she unleashed "Cobra," whose video co-starred one hellacious asp; in "Hiss," she basically is the asp, threatening to sink her fangs into those who mess with her.

In the former, Meg broods over her late parents and faces down depression: "Never thought a b— like me would hit rock bottom." In the latter, she goes on the offensive: "B—es swear they G but the G must stand for Goofy/ When the f— did all the gangster n—as turn to groupies?"

She followed these up with the Gwen Stefani-sampling "Boa," which further turns up the heat: "B—, your time up / Tick tock, tick tock, tick tock, tick tock."

As Megan explained to L'OFFICIEL of her recent musical approach, "This is music I would like if I wasn't Megan Thee Stallion. I don't want to say I'm tapping into other genres. I'm just tapping into other sounds. But it's still very much Megan Thee Stallion. It won't feel like I went so left. It'll feel true to me. You'll almost be like, 'I wouldn't have thought she would've rapped over that, but this sounds great.'"

If "Cobra," "Hiss" and "Boa" are any indication, this snake is about to rattle us.

The Album Arrives June 28

Megan Thee Stallion hasn't released the full tracklisting for Megan yet — but she did confirm the whole shebang is out June 28, onstage during her ongoing Hot Girl Summer Tour. So, it's only a matter of weeks until the album slinks into our speakers.

The Cover Is Eye-Popping

On the cover of Megan, the rapper emerges nude from a Monarch butterfly chrysalis, hanging from a potted indoor tree in a fancy room. Framing the image is a transparent, serifed, monumental M.

As killer as her recent offerings have been, clearly Megan is going to bite — in the best way.

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Photo of Romy performing during the C6 Fest at Parque Ibirapuera in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in May 2024. Romy is singing with her eyes closed in a blue and pink shirt.
Romy performs in Sao Paulo, Brazil

Photo: Mauricio Santana/Getty Images 

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15 LGBTQIA+ Artists Performing At 2024 Summer Festivals

From Renée Rapp, Chappell Roan and Ethel Cain, to Megan Thee Stallion and Conan Gray, 2024 summer festivals are stacked with a rainbow of amazing queer artists to see.

GRAMMYs/Jun 5, 2024 - 01:27 pm

Festival season is well underway, both stateside and abroad, with NYC’s Gov Ball, Chicago’s Lollapalooza, Tennessee’s Bonnaroo, and the UK’s Glastonbury Festival offering an array of acts across multiple stages.

In honor of Pride Month, we’ve rounded up a bunch of LGBTQIA+ artists gracing this summer’s festival circuit  — as well as a few Pride-specific festivals —  that you won’t want to miss. Whether you’re in the mood to dance the night away, cry on your best friend’s shoulder, or just vibe out, there are established and rising artists to suit festival-goers with a variety of musical tastes.

Chappell Roan

After opening for Olivia Rodrigo on her GUTS tour, Midwest Princess Chappell Roan took the world by storm with her live-streamed Coachella performance during the desert festival’s first weekend, coming back just as strong in the second weekend. She also performed on NPR's Tiny Desk series, and her latest single “Good Luck, Babe!” slingshotted her even further into super-stardom. You’d be foolish to miss your chance to catch her on this year’s festival circuit. This time next year, she’ll probably be headlining.  

Where to see Chappell Roan: 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Sunday, June 9 

Kentuckiana Pride Festival  

Louisville, Kentucky 

June 15 

Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Sunday, June 16 

Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Thursday, Aug. 1 

Hinterland Music Festival 

Saint Charles, Iowa 

Performing Sunday, Aug. 4 

Osheaga Music & Arts Festival 

Montréal, Canada 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 3 

Outside Lands  

San Francisco, California 

Aug. 9 – Aug. 11 

Performance date TBD 

All Things Go 

Columbia, Maryland 

Performing Sunday, Sept. 29 

Renée Rapp 

“Mean Girl” Reneé Rapp has had a banner year promoting her 2023 debut album, Snow Angel, the follow-up to her 2022 EP Everything to Everyone, reprising her Broadway role of Regina George in the movie adaptation of the "Mean Girls" musical, collaborating with Megan thee Stallion, and coming out as a lesbian. Snow Angel found the singer exercising her range both vocally and emotionally, and her live performances show off those impressive vocals even more. Luckily, you have a few chances to catch her at a festival this summer. 

Where to see Renée Rapp: 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Sunday, June 9 

Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Saturday, June 15 

Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Friday Aug. 2 

Osheaga Music & Arts Festival 

Montréal, Canada 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 3 

All Things Go 

Columbia, Maryland 

Performing Sunday, Sep. 29 

Blondshell 

Previously performing under the moniker BAUM, Sabrina Teitelbaum has found her niche as Blondshell, writing unflinchingly honest and relatable lyrics about the human condition and belting them out over noisy guitars. Blondshell burst on the scene in 2022 with a '90s-inspired sound, reminiscent of the shoegaze bands of grunge’s golden era. Her self-titled 2023 debut album explores themes of failed relationships and shame, sobriety, unrequited love for a woman, and even a little murder, all with levity and vulnerability most 20-somethings can relate to. 

Aside from the obvious perks of the loud guitars during her live set, you might also be lucky enough to catch a cool cover–she’s known to perform Le Tigre’s “Deceptacon” at shows, and she just released a cover of the Talking Heads’ “Thank You For Sending Me An Angel” for the A24 tribute album, Everyone’s Getting Involved.  

Where to see Blondshell: 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Friday, June 7 

Day In Day Out 

Seattle, Washington  

Performing Sunday, July 13 

Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Thursday, Aug. 1 

Hinterland Music Festival 

Saint Charles, Iowa 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 3  

All Things Go 

Columbia, Maryland 

Performing Sunday, Sep. 29 

G Flip 

Maybe you always knew who G Flip was. Maybe you were introduced to the nonbinary Aussie artist when they made headlines for their relationship with reality TV star Chrishell Stause. Or maybe you became a fan when you heard their incredible, sapphic-twisted cover of Taylor Swift’s “Cruel Summer” for triple-J’s Like a Version series (which even got Taylor’s stamp of approval).   

However you found G Flip, you probably became a little obsessed instantly, marveling at their ability to croon and play the drums simultaneously without missing a beat. The energy G brought to their in-studio performance at triple-J is indicative of the energy you’ll see on the stage when they play a couple of festivals this summer.  

Where to see G Flip: 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Sunday, June 9 

Nashville Pride 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Performing Sunday, June 23 

Backlot Bash 

Chicago, Illinois 

June 30 

Spin Off Adelaide 

Adelaide, Australia 

July 19 

Romy

Romy might be better known as part of British indie trio the xx, but her career as a solo artist is just as worthy of recognition. Making feel-good dance music about queer love, the 2024 GRAMMYs first time nominee has the unique ability to transport you to a world where everything is okay and there’s no better place to be than moving in tandem with the people around you. For a true one-with-the-crowd festival experience, jumping around to Romy’s electro-pop is the perfect option. 

Where to see Romy: 

Osheaga Music & Arts Festival 

Montréal, Canada 

Performing Friday, Aug. 2 

Lollapalooza  

Performing Saturday, Aug. 3 

Outside Lands  

San Francisco, California 

Aug. 9 – Aug. 11 

Performance date TBD 

Ethel Cain

Ethel Cain is a force to be reckoned with. Despite the unconventional nature of her music  — which explores themes of religion and conceptual stories about abuse — she’s made a place for herself in the mainstream with singles like “Crush” and “American Teenager" (the latter track nabbed a spot on President Barack Obama’s end-of-year playlist in 2022).   

More than just a great storyteller, she’s an easy to admire artist who is outspoken about human rights. Plus, her performances always feel intimate, even when they’re on festival stages in front of a huge crowd. 

 Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Saturday, June 15 

Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 3 

Hinterland Music Festival 

Saint Charles, Iowa 

Performing Sunday, Aug. 4 

Thing Festival 

Carnation, Washington 

Aug. 9 – Aug. 11 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 10 

 All Things Go 

Columbia, Maryland 

Performing Saturday, Sep. 28 

Ryan Beatty

Singer/songwriter Ryan Beatty may be your favorite artist’s favorite artist. He became a bit of a teen sensation in the early aughts for his YouTube covers of popular songs, later gaining wider recognition for his Brockhampton collaborations. His solo career has since taken off, making him a reference point for other singer/songwriters — especially following his 2023 album, Calico 

His knack for songwriting even led him to working on a number of tracks on Beyoncé’s COWBOY CARTER album. Ryan’s songs are tender and full of yearning, brimming with raw and real emotion–it’s best to bring some tissues when you catch one of his sets. 

Where to see Ryan Beatty: 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Friday, June 7 

Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Saturday, June 15 

Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Friday, Aug. 2 

Outside Lands  

San Francisco, California 

Aug. 9 – Aug. 11 

Performance date TBD 

The Japanese House 

Amber Bain, or the artist known as the Japanese House, shied away from publicity at the beginning of her career. Hand-picked by Matty Healy of The 1975 to make music under his label, Dirty Hit, Bain's haunting melodies and painfully relatable lyrics resonated with listeners and critics — even when they didn’t know who was singing and producing the tracks they were falling for.   

Now, she’s proud to take all the credit for her hard work and talent. The Japanese House’s latest effort, In the End It Always Does, is packed with resonant tracks about growing up, longing, existentialism, and even a sweet, sad ode to man’s best friend — her dog, Joni Jones, is named for Joni Mitchell — all of which sound incredible live. 

Where to see The Japanese House: 

Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Friday, June 14 

Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Thursday, Aug. 1 

Osheaga Music & Arts Festival 

Montréal, Canada 

Performing Friday, Aug. 2 

Outside Lands  

San Francisco, California 

Aug. 9 – Aug. 11 

Performance date TBD 

 MUNA 

When MUNA calls themselves “the greatest band in the world,” they aren’t lying. The L.A.-based queer pop trio toured for nearly all of 2023, including playing as an opening act for select dates of Taylor Swift’s record-breaking Eras tour. Their fanbase blew up since signing to Phoebe Bridgers’ Saddest Factory Records in 2021 and releasing their third album, led by the hit single “Silk Chiffon.”   

MUNA has built on that momentum by perfecting their live show, as evidenced by two stellar sold out tour-closing shows at Los Angeles' Greek Theater. While they’re taking a break from touring to work on their next record, MUNA are making a few festival stops this summer, including in singer Katie Gavin’s hometown of Chicago.  

L.A. Pride in the Park 

Los Angeles, California 

Saturday, June 8 

Summerfest 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

June 20 – 22, June 27 – 29, July 4 – 6 

Performing Friday, June 27 

Pitchfork Music Festival 

Chicago, Illinois 

July 19 – July 21 

Performing Sunday, July 21 

Newport Folk Festival 

Newport, Rhode Island 

July 26 – July 28 

Performing Friday, July 26 

Ashnikko 

Ashnikko doesn’t fit into any box, and no two songs sound the same. The blue-haired phenom’s catalog spans from upbeat hyperpop-rap infusions about hard work, reimagined cheers from Bring It On with horror influences, and emo-tinged ballads about how scary it feels to be safely in love. With such a diverse range, you couldn’t possibly be bored watching her perform, especially since her live sets usually boast great visual effects and choreography.  

Where to see Ashnikko: 

Outloud Festival  

Los Angeles, California 

June 1 – June 2 

Performing Sunday, June 2 

Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Sunday, June 16 

Open’er Festival 

Gdynia, Poland 

July 3 – July 6 

Performing Wednesday, July 3 

Arlo Parks

GRAMMY-nominated singer/songwriter Arlo Parks is the mellow you need in your hectic festival schedule. The 24-year-old is wise beyond her years, as reflected in the gorgeous lyrics about falling in love all over her 2023 album, My Soft Machine: On “Devotion,” she sings, “Your touch embroiders me/I'm wide open,” on “Pegasus,” which features Phoebe Bridgers, she muses, “Never felt luckier than I do right now/Tell me you love me, let me have it.”  

Arlo also released her debut poetry book, The Magic Border, last year, offering her lyrical talent in an even more raw form of expression. While her music is soft and dreamy, she doesn’t shy away from hard and fast guitars on a bunch of tracks, making live performances more exhilarating than you might expect.  

Where to see Arlo Parks: 

Glastonbury Festival 

Pilton, England 

June 26 – June 30 

Performing Wednesday, June 26 

Mad Cool Festival 

Madrid, Spain 

July 10 – July 13 

Performing Saturday, July 13 

Osheaga Music & Arts Festival 

Montréal, Canada 

Performing Friday, Aug. 2 

Thing Festival 

Carnation, Washington 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 10 

Palehound

Indie band Palehound got a shoutout from the New York Times for their 2023 single, “Independence Day,” a hopeful, if not deluded, breakup song with plucky guitar and a fun-to-chant chorus about “living life like writing a first draft.” Despite having a pretty major reach, Palehound, made up of El Kempner (they/them) Zoë Brecher, and Larz Brogan, is still a fairly DIY band, which makes them all the more fun to listen to, especially live.  

NICE, a fest  

Somerville, Massachusetts  

July 25 – 28 

Performing Saturday, July 28 

Hinterland Music Festival 

Saint Charles, Iowa 

Performing Sunday, Aug. 4 

End of the Road Festival 

Larmer Tree Gardens, United Kingdom 

Aug. 29 – Sept. 1 

Performing Saturday, Aug. 31 

Megan thee Stallion 

Despite people trying to keep her down, Megan Thee Stallion continues to rise and conquer, putting the work above everything else. As an independent artist, this feat is even more impressive, but the total creative control she benefits from has allowed for exciting opportunities of self-expression that align with all the things that make Meg one-of-a-kind.  

Her 2024 video for “BOA” let the self-proclaimed anime nerd tap into her geek side, rich with references to her favorite animated shows and video games. And if you’ve seen any of her tour outfits lately–you know that you don’t wanna miss the chance to catch her at a festival this summer.  

Where to see Megan Thee Stallion: 

Bonnaroo  

Manchester, Tennessee  

Performing Sunday, June 16 

Broccoli City Festival 

Washington, D.C. 

July 27 – July 28 

Performing Saturday, July 27

Doechii 

Self-proclaimed “Swamp Princess” Doechii is one of the most exciting new artists of her time, seamlessly blending house influences and smooth R&B vocals with hip-hop beats and clever raps. She’s not afraid to have fun, either, especially when it comes to self-expression in her stylistic choices. Her surrealist music videos have garnered her praise and comparisons to legends like Missy Elliott, but despite all the influences, Doechii is truly one of a kind.  

Where to see Doechii: 

Outloud Festival  

Los Angeles, California 

Performing Saturday, June 1 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Saturday, June 8 

Tinashe

Tinashe has been around for years, but she’s having a renaissance at the moment thanks to her new single “Nasty,” a sexy bop for the summer which has inspired viral dance trends on TikTok. The multi-talented singer is also a hell of a dancer herself, and her live shows give her the perfect opportunity to show off her moves. If you get the chance to catch her at a festival this summer, don’t pass it up.  

Where to see Tinashe:  

Nashville Pride 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Performing Saturday, June 22 

Open’er Festival 

Gdynia, Poland 

Performing Wednesday, July 3 

Underscores

No music festival bill is complete without a dubstep-adjacent artist, and Underscores is here to fill the gap with her Skrillex-inspired beats. A self-taught producer and vocalist, Underscores started playing around with making beats and loops as a kid, graduating to GarageBand before releasing music at just 13 years old.  

Now 24, she’s been officially releasing music for over a decade, showing off her wide range of influences in eclectic tracks that have hints of bedroom pop, hyperpop, emo, metal, and of course, dubstep. While her production is unique and stellar, her topical and tongue-in-cheek lyrics are not to be overlooked, either.  

Where to see Underscores: 

The Governor’s Ball  

Queens, New York  

Performing Friday, June 7 

Conan Gray

After rising to fame on TikTok in 2020 with his soft and sad unrequited love anthem, “Heather,” Conan Gray has kept the momentum going by not being afraid to try new things. His latest album, Found Heaven, is full of '80s new wave inspired synth pop, offering him a new slate to show off some powerhouse vocals. It also features production and writing assistance from powerhouse producer/songwriter Max Martin, elevating Conan’s sound to new levels that are good for more than just TikTok soundbites.  

Where to see Conan Gray: 

 Lollapalooza  

Chicago, Illinois 

Performing Sunday, Aug. 4 

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PRIDE & Black Music Month: Celebrating LGBTQIA+ & Black Voices

Atarashii Gakko!, Ikura of Yoasobi, Hiroa Fukuda and Moeka Shiotsuka of Hitsuji Bungaku, King Gnu
(Clockwise from upper left): Atarashii Gakko!, Ikura of Yoasobi, Hiroa Fukuda and Moeka Shiotsuka of Hitsuji Bungaku, King Gnu

Photos: Scott Dudelson/Getty Images for Coachella, Dana Jacobs/Getty Images, Justin Shin/Getty Images, Gene Wang/Getty Images

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10 Neo J-Pop Artists Breaking The Mold In 2024: Fujii Kaze, Kenshi Yonezu & Others

Japan’s domestic pop market has incredible depth and growing Western interest. From Vocaloid acts to anime-centric productions and a plethora of genre-bending releases, the country's musicians and solo artists are breaking ground and making noise.

GRAMMYs/May 23, 2024 - 01:38 pm

At this year’s Coachella, Japan’s music industry made a statement: out with the old, in with the new. Where previous years hosted legacy acts like Utada Hikaru and Kyary Pamyu Pamyu, up-and-coming hitmakers YOASOBI and cult favorites Atarashii Gakkou! played to sizable crowds in 2024. They represent just the tip of the iceberg for Japanese musicians touring stateside: J-R&B star Fujii Kaze will tour the country this month, and numerous acts have seen exposure abroad thanks to anime soundtrack work and streaming playlists such as Spotify’s Gatcha Pop.

Anime, by far the country’s biggest cultural export, is a major factor in Japan’s music industry, with songs composed for animated films, TV, and streaming projects — and to a lesser extent video games — making up a growing number of the country’s most dominant pop hits. "Anison," or anime songs, have become extremely prestigious commissions for the country’s pop musicians, especially for younger artists who have seen anime gain traction both in Japan and internationally. 

That younger generation is now taking control of the charts, and making inroads into international markets by leaning into what makes their music and culture unique. For musicians like Kenshi Yonezu, vocal synthesizer software Vocaloid allowed them to develop their own musical voice on their own terms. The most famous Vocaloid artist, Hatsune Miku, also played Coachella this year as a video-projected anime avatar. There’s also remarkable freedom to play with genre in J-pop. Acts freely swap between sounds —from alternative rock to funky city pop, or R&B to electro-pop — in the span of a few songs. 

These factors have made Japan’s domestic pop market one of the most interesting to watch in the world. It’s gotten to the point where top English-language artists aren’t seeing the success they used to in the country, largely because the Japanese public has shifted its attention toward Korean and domestic artists. For Westerners, Japan can seem like another world, and this is especially true for its music scene. 

To bridge the gap, GRAMMY.com has created a primer to 10 of Japan’s most interesting new acts. Who knows, you might just see them stateside soon. 

Ado

Japan isn’t exactly a happy country. Social pressure is high, the economy has been stagnant for years even before its current monetary crisis and its brutal work culture is not exactly the envy of the world. Young people often feel as though they have nothing to look forward to but misery, so when someone comes along and says it’s okay to tell the adults in your life to f— off, it resonates.

This is essentially how 22-year-old singer Ado (born 2002) became the voice of Gen Z. Late in 2020 amid the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic, she burst onto the J-pop scene with "Useewa," a rock-centric track composed by Vocaloid producer Syudou whose title translates, roughly, to "Shut the f— up." Detailing the angst of having to grin and bear the conformity of adulthood and the satisfaction of rejecting it, the song clearly struck a chord with young people in Japan. The song’s brash lyrics also sparked a moral panic from parents and the media over its anti-conformist message.

Ado’s charismatic, fiery vocal delivery, coupled with a nasty anime visual, really sells the whole package, making it a rage-filled counterpart to YOASOBI’s similarly disaffected "Yoru ni Kakeru." 

"Usseewa" topped the Billboard Japan Hot 100, the Oricon Digital Singles and Streaming charts, and the Spotify Viral 50 Japan. The video reached 100 million views on YouTube within 150 days of release. Ado has since earned more hits, furthering her wild persona with the even louder and wilder "Show." She also earned a starring role as a singer in One Piece Film: Red, the most recent theatrical installment of the biggest manga franchise in the world. 

Atarashii Gakko! 

There’s a saying in Japan about the risks of refusing to conform to society’s expectations: "The nail that sticks out gets hammered down." When it comes to finding success on the international music market, however, the opposite seems to be true. The world loves Japan when it’s at its zaniest and most distinctive, and artists that lean into this are often able to build a following abroad.

Case in point: A rapping girl group wearing vintage-inspired sailor-suit school uniforms called Atarashii Gakko! (translation: New School). The group just played Coachella and, prior, performed on "Jimmy Kimmel Live." To be sure, a lot of the foursome’s appeal is in the visual department. The group’s wild, Beastie Boys-esque video for "Tokyo Calling" pairs their sukeban girl gang-style outfits with a plethora of retro visual references: kaiju films like Godzilla, Super Sentai, even Bollywood-style dance. Musically, they’re just as mixed up, having taken on ‘80s city pop in "Otonablue" as well as adding to Japan’s legacy of unique hip-hop on "NAI NAI NAI." 

The group’s ethos since forming in 2015 has been to shine a new path for Japan’s youth by embracing individuality and nonconformity, and it’s paid dividends so far. Their new album, AG! Calling, is set for release June 7.

Creepy Nuts

There’s a lot of bizarre, potentially conflicting elements in Creepy Nuts’ hit song "Bling-Bang-Bang-Born." There’s the sound-effect-bubble title, the anarchic rapping of vocalist R-Shitei, and producer DJ Matsunaga’s use of a Jersey Club beat (a trend with forward-thinking East Asian pop acts). There’s also the fact that it was composed for an anime about…wizards with muscles

In any case, the theme song for the TV anime "Mashle: Magic and Muscles" has pulled some chart magic of its own, topping the Billboard Japan Hot 100 for eight weeks straight earlier this year, largely thanks to the viral "BBBB dance" challenge. The duo have also taken the song worldwide, reaching No. 8 on Billboard U.S.’s Global 200 and performing the song on Global Spin. If you want to find the biggest J-Pop hit of this exact moment, look no further. 

Fujii Kaze

Raised in small-town Okayama prefecture in the western reaches of Japan, Fujii Kaze is being positioned as the next big artist to emerge from the country. He toured Asia in 2023 and will come to America this May; he also launched the Japanese version of Tiny Desk Concerts earlier this year. He’s also been working with international talent, such as Kendrick Lamar and 21 Savage producer DJ Dahi on the piano-driven hip-hop track "Workin’ Hard."

The video for "Matsuri," in which Fujii (the artist lists his surname first) traipses around a Japanese garden and parties with foreigners at a traditional mansion, feels almost like a tourist advertisement for the country, projecting an image of refined, effortless Japanese cool. Recent song "Hana," produced by Charli XCX and Utada Hikaru collaborator A. G. Cook, feels even more like a play for the international market with a ‘70s California soft rock backing track and a visual that puts Fujii on a journey through the desert.

Herein lies the secret to Fujii Kaze’s appeal: he’s hot and cool at the same time. His success is predicated not just on good looks and buttery croon, but on a smooth, easygoing persona that feels native and international at the same time. "Matsuri," with its chill yet glamorous R&B production and can’t-be-bothered lyrics ("there’s no reason to suffer / no need to be disappointed / I really couldn’t care less") exemplifies his laid-back mentality. He’s also, notably, shunned the anime market, preferring to put his songs in basketball promos and telecoms commercials – anime is cool enough for Megan Thee Stallion but not for Fujii, it seems. 

Hitsujibungaku

Just as grunge reignited America’s love of rock music in the ‘90s, Japan also embraced guitar-oriented, pop-rock in the same decade thanks to bands like B’z, Number Girl, Southern All-Stars, Asian Kung-Fu Generation, and Visual Kei groups like L’Arc-en-Ciel and X Japan. As the U.S. began to embrace hip-hop and dance-pop in the 2000s, rock and metal persisted in the Japanese mainstream. New bands continue to perform at "live house" venues in hip areas like Tokyo’s Shimokitazawa neighborhood, while groups playing niche styles like math rock, shoegaze, and metalcore have found support. CHAI, tricot, Alexandros, Otoboke Beaver, and Official Hige Dandism are just a few bands that have emerged from this milieu in recent years to success at home and abroad.

Tokyo-based trio Hitsujibungaku offers a good starting point of where Japan’s rock scene is going. The majority-female group found success on the anime song circuit last year, delivering the end credits track for mega-popular TV anime "Jujutsu Kaisen." "More than words" which became the lead single for their recent album 12 hugs like butterflies, immediately stuck out for its shuffling, nostalgic melody, and evocative, fuzzy layering of guitar tone influenced by shoegaze. 

Kenshi Yonezu

More than most mega-successful J-pop artists, Kenshi Yonezu owes his success to the Vocaloid and internet music communities in which he forged his artistry. Raised in rural Tokushima, he began his career as a teenager in the late 2000s, uploading music to the video site Nico Nico Douga under the name Hachi, and soon found his most successful tracks were the ones that used Vocaloids like Hatsune Miku. Like many artists in the digital age, Yonezu’s early work was entirely DIY, as thanks to Vocaloid he was able to produce, write, and even design artwork for his music all on his own.

Eventually, Yonezu signed to a major label and began to split time between his Vocaloid tracks as Hachi and music made under his own name. His album Bootleg won Album Of THe Year at the Japan Record Awards in 2018, and he became known for tender, uptempo ballads like "Uchiage Hanabi" and "Lemon" (the latter of which still reigns as the most-viewed video by a Japanese musician on YouTube with over 800 million views). 

Two high profile anime commissions have driven Yonezu’s star beyond Japan. In 2022, he produced the opening theme for the highly-anticipated adaptation of Tatsuki Fujimoto’s acclaimed manga Chainsaw Man. "Kick Back" departed from Yonezu’s biggest hits by leaning into the show’s action premise with drum and bass beats and an aggressive guitar melody. Buoyed by the anime’s success, "Kick Back" topped the Oricon and Billboard Japan singles charts and even charted in the U.K., Canada, and the U.S., where it became the first Japanese-language song to be certified gold by the RIAA. 

Then in 2023, he produced and sang "Spinning Globe," the end credits theme for Hayao Miyazaki’s first film in a decade, The Boy and the Heron. It was the first time the anime auteur, who usually uses older pop music or score from usual composer Joe Hisaishi, had chosen a contemporary pop artist to write for him. 

King Gnu

King Gnu aren’t afraid to mix it up. They gained acclaim in Japan by pursuing a pop rock sound that’s one part city pop, one part hip-hop. Tracks like "Hakujutsu" and "Kasa" pair sick riffs and boogie basslines with turntable scratching and delicate, yet powerful vocals from Daiki Tsuneta and Satoru Iguchi.

Last year they scored a major hit with "Specialz," which was used as an opening theme for popular anime "Jujutsu Kaisen." Setting the mood for the show’s bleak second season with metallic techno drums and brawny guitar riffs, the menacing song peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Japan Hot 100 and currently has over 166 million Spotify streams. Tsuneta also leads the collective millennium parade, who lean toward electronic music and scored a hit with "U," from the Mamoru Hosoda musical anime BELLE

MAISONdes

Conceptual projects are much more common in the Japanese pop landscape than one might expect. Case in point: MAISONdes. While not a band or a collective, MAISONdes is an imaginary apartment building where lonely hearts find solace in song. The virtual building is accessible through a website, and each song produced for the project is assigned a room number and created by a randomly-paired team of producers and vocalists that changes with each track. Participants have included chart star Aimer and VTubers such as KAF and Hoshimachi Suisei. 

Too complicated? Too weird? At least the music is good, focused on high-energy electro pop reminiscent of Kyary Pamyu Pamyu, idol pop, and the Vocaloid, anisong, and netlabel acts of recent decades. As such, the most high-profile MAISONdes tracks have been those produced for anime and promotional campaigns. They’ve done all the opening and ending themes for the recent TV anime reboot of classic comedy manga "Urusei Yatsura," and their most recent track, "Popcorn" was a collab with Sanrio celebrating the 50th anniversary of Hello Kitty, one of the original kawaii culture icons. The hyperactive song gained a million views on YouTube within three days of being posted. 

Vaundy

City pop — the ‘70s and ‘80s musical movement that blended American funk and AOR with disco and synthpop — looms large in the J-pop landscape. Although its revival has somewhat peaked following the pandemic, that hasn’t stopped guys like Vaundy from channeling the sound into their own music.

His breakout hit "Tokyo Flash" paired the grooves of the city pop era with a more down-to-earth arrangement with simpler production. Further attempts to modernize the sound have also found success: "Todome no Ichigeki," written for the popular anime "Spy x Family," featured a grand, orchestral instrumental and a guest verse from rapper Cory Wong. With romantic lyrics reminiscent of City Pop king Tatsuro Yamashita, it’s a true return to the retro style. 

Of course, like most J-pop musicians, Vaundy isn’t a stylistic purist. He’s also applied his confident vocal style to several brisk rock tracks, resulting in chart success. His heavy metal jam for the Chainsaw Man TV anime soundtrack, "CHAINSAW BLOOD," peaked at 13 on the Billboard Japan Hot 100, while the poppier "Kaijuu no Hana Uta" went to No. 2 after he performed the song on the "2022 Kohaku Uta Gassen" New Year’s Eve show. 

YOASOBI

Inarguably the focal point of contemporary J-pop, no other act has defined the current era in Japan more than YOASOBI. The duo of Ayase and Ikura burst onto the scene in 2019 with the song "Yoru ni Kakeru," based on a short story posted on the site Monogatary. Pairing an upbeat instrumental with bleak, literary lyrics about death and suicide, it’s the most unlikely of pop hits. Released in late 2019, just as the COVID-19 pandemic began to grip Japan a few months before the rest of the world. "Yoru ni Kakeru" became a massive, award-winning smash. Billboard Japan named it the first song in its chart history to pass 1 billion streams, and Oricon named it the most-streamed song of the Reiwa era just last month. 

Read more: From Tokyo To Coachella: YOASOBI's Journey To Validate J-Pop And Vocaloid As Art Forms

Since then the band have become major hitmakers and fixtures of the anison production line, writing theme tracks for hit anime like "Mobile Suit Gundam: The Witch from Mercury" and "Frieren: Journey’s End." They scored another era-defining hit with "Idol," their opening song for the controversial 2023 showbiz satire "Oshi no Ko." Responding to the anime’s twisted tale of a mysterious J-pop idol with dark secrets, the duo paired a bombastic instrumental with lyrics that perfectly capture the cardinal rule of stardom: tell all and reveal nothing. 

The song became such a cultural phenomenon in Japan that YOASOBI performed it at last year’s "Kohaku Uta Gassen" New Year’s TV special flanked by dozens of J-Pop and K-Pop idols, including members of NewJeans, LE SSERAFIM, and Nogizaka46. 

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Camila Cabello & Lil Nas X
Camila Cabello & Lil Nas X

Photo: Courtesy Camila Cabello & Lil Nas X

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New Music Friday: Listen to Songs From Megan Thee Stallion, Camila Cabello & Lil Nas X, BTS' RM & More

May 10 is quite the stacked day of new music across all genres — from Post Malone & Morgan Wallen's country collab, to Stray Kids' team-up with Charlie Puth, to The Chainsmokers and Kings of Leon. Check out some fresh releases to enjoy this weekend here.

GRAMMYs/May 10, 2024 - 06:55 pm

As the summer quickly approaches, artists from every genre continue to unveil new music for warmer weather. Friday May 10 is particularly packed with anticipated and surprise releases from both emerging talents and established names.

The new albums alone prove just that: pop songsmith Alec Benjamin's 12 Notes, folk-rock band Judah & the Lion's The Process, regional Mexican stars Grupo Frontera's Jugando a Que No Pasa Nada, and GRAMMY-winning R&B singer Andra Day's Cassandra, to name a few.

Meanwhile, a big, cool glass of major rap releases is here to help wash down the piping hot Kendrick and Drake beef served up over the last week. Full album releases debuted from Gunna, Chief Keef, and Ghostface Killah — the latter featuring guest spots from Nas, Kanye West, Raekwon, Method Man and more. Hottie Megan Thee Stallion's powerful new single, "BOA", sets the stage for her Hot Girl Summer tour which officially starts on May 14. New songs from Ice Spice, Kodak Black, NLE Choppa, Coi Leray, G-Eazy, Yung Gravy, Ski Mask the Slump God set the playlist for a weekend full of slappers.

There's tons of collaborations, too, including the much-teased pairing of Post Malone and Morgan Wallen with "I Had Some Help," a track that showcases Malone's furtherance into country in a catchy, reflective anthem. But country music lovers also have more to enjoy this weekend: Orville Peck's duets project, Stampede Vol.1, features the likes of Willie Nelson and Elton John," while Scotty McCreery's Rise & Fall and Avery Anna's single "Blonde" fill the fuel tank for a rodeo-ready summer. 

BTS's RM delivers another solo track "Come Back to Me" and Stray Kids dropped a new collaboration with Charlie Puth, coming fresh off the K-pop group's appearance at the Met Gala earlier this week. And the electronic and rock scenes are not left behind, with A.G. Cook exploring a new twist on Britpop and Sebastian Bach's release of Child Within The Man.

Dive into today's releases from Megan Thee Stallion, The Chainsmokers, RM, Stray Kids with Charlie Puth, Camila Cabello with Lil Nas X, Post Malone and Morgan Wallen below. 

Megan Thee Stallion, "BOA"

Megan Thee Stallion's new single "BOA" continues to play up the themes of empowerment and self-realization that define her current musical phase and comes just days ahead of her Hot Girl Summer Tour starting on May 14. The song's cover art features Megan with a striking snake, a recurring symbol of rebirth that has been significant in her recent work, appearing in tracks like the Billboard Hot 100 hit "Hiss" and the 2023 song "Cobra." 

"BOA" is a continuation of Megan's snake-themed narrative, but serves as a saccharine homage to her favorite late-'90s and early 2000s anime and video game classics. The music video features references to Scott Pilgrim, One Piece, Dance Dance Revolution, and iconic 3D fighting games like Mortal Kombat, complete with visuals and Gantz-inspired outfits.

Speaking to Women's Health about her upcoming summer album, Megan discussed the personal growth and renewal she has experienced, inspiring this new era of music. "I was inspired to create this album about rebirth because I feel I am becoming a new person physically and mentally," she shared.

Camila Cabello & Lil Nas X, "HE KNOWS"

Camila Cabello teams up with Lil Nas X for the tantalizing new song "He Knows," delivering a radio-friendly track that's as catchy as it is lustful. The new music mirrors the infectious energy of their recent appearance at FKA Twigs' Met Gala afterparty, where they both were seen dancing the night away behind the DJ booth. 

"He Knows" serves as a precursor to Cabello's highly anticipated fourth solo album, C,XOXO, — set to drop on June 28 — and teases a glimpse of Cabello's evolving artistic direction. The single follows on the heels of her recent hit "I LUV IT" featuring Playboi Carti, part of the  reimagining of her sound and artistic brand.

RM, "Come Back To Me"

BTS member RM has released a new single, "Come Back To Me," accompanied by a music video. The relaxed track gives fans a taste of his upcoming second solo album, Right Place, Wrong Person, set to release on May 24. 

In the song, RM explores themes of right and wrong, capturing the complex emotions of wanting to explore new avenues while wishing to stay comfortable in the present. "Come Back To Me" features contributions from OHHYUK of the South Korean band HYUKOH, and Kuo of the Taiwanese band Sunset Rollercoaster. Additional credits include JNKYRD and San Yawn from Balming Tiger. RM first performed "Come Back To Me" during a surprise appearance at BTS bandmate Suga's concert in Seoul last summer, noting it as a favorite from his forthcoming album. 

The music video for "Come Back To Me" was written, directed, and produced by Lee Sung Jin, known for his work on the Netflix show "Beef." The video features actress Kim Minha from the Apple TV+ series "Pachinko" and faces themes of identity and self-reflection, showing RM confronting different versions of himself. Its cast includes notable Korean and American actors such as Joseph Lee, Lee Sukhyeong, and Kim A Hyun.

Post Malone & Morgan Wallen, "I Had Some Help"

Post Malone and Morgan Wallen blend their distinct musical styles in the much-anticipated release of their collaborative single "I Had Some Help." Merging Malone's versatile pop sensibilities while leaning into his country roots with Wallen's, well, help, the duet is a unique crossover that has had fans clamoring to hear more since the two first teased the song earlier this year. 

Finally premiering during Wallen's headlining performance at Stagecoach Festival on April 28, the uptempo song explores themes of mutual support and shared experiences, encapsulated by the lyric, "It ain't like I can make this kind of mess all by myself."

The collaboration has sparked significant buzz and showcases the duo's chemistry and shared knack for storytelling. This single highlights their individual talents as well as their ability to bridge genre divides, already promising to be a hit on the charts and a favorite among fans.

The Chainsmokers, No Hard Feelings

Maestros of mainstream emotion, The Chainsmokers continue to master the art of turning personal reflections into global anthems with their latest EP, No Hard Feelings. The six-song project see Alex Pall and Drew Taggart exploring the emotional highs and lows of modern relationships, weaving their signature dance beats with pop sensibilities as they have since 2015's "Roses." 

The duo's latest release serves as a soundtrack to both sun-kissed days and introspective nights. The collection includes the single "Friday," a collaboration with Haitian-American singer Fridayy, described by the duo as a direct descendant of "Roses." Other tracks, such as "Addicted," also underscore the Chainsmokers' knack for capturing the zeitgeist of contemporary love and loss.

Kings of Leon, Can We Please Have Fun

Kings of Leon return with their signature blend of rock and introspection on their ninth studio album, Can We Please Have Fun. The LP finds the band infusing their established sound with fresh, unbridled energy, reminiscent of their early days yet matured by years of experience. The album features standout tracks like "Mustang" and "Nothing To Do," which mix playful lyrics with serious musical chops, showcasing Kings of Leon's unique ability to combine rock's raw power with catchy, thoughtful songwriting.

The band is set to bring Can We Please Have Fun to life on their 2024 world tour, starting in Leeds, United Kingdom on June 20 and wrapping in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on Oct. 5. Fans can expect a high-energy series of performances that blend new tracks with beloved classics, all delivered with the Kings of Leon's legendary fervor.

Stray Kids & Charlie Puth, "Lose My Breath"

Stray Kids have teamed up with Charlie Puth for their latest release, "Lose My Breath," a track that blends K-pop dynamism with Western pop flair, written by Stray Kids' own producer team 3racha (Bang Chan, Changbin, and Han) along with Puth. The TK song details a whirlwind of emotions, describing symptoms of breathlessness and heart-palpitating moments encapsulated in the lyrics: "I lose my breath when you're walking in/ 'Cause when our eyes lock, it's like my heart stops." 

"Lose My Breath" is described as a "warm-up" for Stray Kids' forthcoming album, set for release this summer. The track further highlights the global appeal of Stray Kids ahead of their highly anticipated headlining set at Lollapalooza in August. It also continues Puth's engagement with K-pop, following his previous work with other K-pop acts including his collab with BTS' Jungkook, "Left and Right," and "Like That," a song he co-wrote for K-pop girl group BABYMONSTER

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