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Grey Goose And The Recording Academy Gear Up For The GRAMMYs With 'Monday Mix' Featuring JoJo, Lucky Daye, Tinashe, & Law Roach

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Grey Goose And The Recording Academy Gear Up For The GRAMMYs With 'Monday Mix' Featuring JoJo, Lucky Daye, Tinashe, & Law Roach

Premiering today, the multi-faceted content series will feature exclusive performances and interviews from top trendsetters from JoJo to Lucky Daye

GRAMMYs/Mar 14, 2022 - 09:35 pm

Grey Goose, the "Official Spirit Partner of the 64th Annual GRAMMY Awards," and The Recording Academy are pleased to debut "Monday Mix," an all-new content series that will premiere every Monday throughout the rest of the month.

Starting today, the digital series will feature intimate musical performances and behind-the-scenes footage from trailblazing artists including JoJo, Tinashe, and six-time GRAMMY-nominated artist Lucky Daye

Additionally, Grey Goose will be collaborating with stylist-to-the-stars Law Roach as its official GRAMMY-Style Partner, who will facilitate intimate conversations on music, artistic expression, and effortless style with each artist. Roach will also debut an exclusive new GRAMMYs martini cocktail recipe that viewers can easily make at home.

With each installment of "GREY GOOSE x GRAMMYs: Monday Mix," the vodka brand will reimagine the traditional start of the work week as a day of celebration and build excitement for the 64th Annual GRAMMY Awards ceremony on Sunday, April 3rd. 

"I'm thrilled to be partnering with an iconic vodka like GREY GOOSE to showcase music and style for the GRAMMYs this year," said Roach. "Music and fashion have always gone hand-in-hand, so getting to speak with some of my favorite artists about how individual style has shaped their artistic vision is really exciting for me. 

"These conversations always go well with a great cocktail," he continued. "So, my guests will be sipping on the delicious Passion Drop — the official cocktail of the GRAMMY Awards — while I'll be sipping on my own twist on a martini cocktail that I call 'The Law.'"

The first "GREY GOOSE x GRAMMYs: Monday Mix" segment launched today at 11:00am EST on Instagram and YouTube with an acoustic performance by multi-platinum recording artist JoJo, followed by Lucky Daye — who is nominated for Best Traditional R&B Performance and Best Progressive R&B album in this year's ceremony — on March 21, and Tinashe on March 28. 

Read More: With Candydrip, Lucky Daye Is Ready To Deliver A New Kind Of R&B: "I Didn't Want To Sound Like Everybody Else"

"I'm so pleased to be a part of 'Monday Mix' and celebrate a year of incredible music with GREY GOOSE and The Recording Academy," said Tinashe. "Everyone looks forward to the performances at the GRAMMYs ceremony, and I love that this series is extending that enthusiasm beyond just one night. I'm excited for my fans to see my performance later this month. It's going to be a good one!"

All "GREY GOOSE x GRAMMYs: Monday Mix" content can be accessed by following each artist, along with @greygoose and the Recording Academy on all social platforms, as well as on the official GRAMMYs Content Hub. Performances will be accompanied by exclusive interviews, product drops, and behind-the-scenes GRAMMYs content from now through the 28th.

The Content Hub will also house all official GRAMMYs cocktail recipes, including the ceremony's signature cocktail The Passion Drop and Roach's new twist "The Law."

2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show: Complete Nominations List

The Recording Academy Announces Major Changes For The 2022 GRAMMY Awards Show

GRAMMY trophies at the 59th GRAMMY Awards in 2017

Photo: ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

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The Recording Academy Announces Major Changes For The 2022 GRAMMY Awards Show

Process amendments include the elimination of nominations review committees and the addition of two new GRAMMY Award categories, including Best Global Music Performance and Best Música Urbana Album

GRAMMYs/May 1, 2021 - 01:27 am

Editor's Note: The 2022 GRAMMYs Awards show, officially known as the 64th GRAMMY Awards, <a href="https://www.grammy.com/news/2022-grammys-awards-64th-new-air-show-date-location-las-vegas-april-3-announcement "https://www.grammy.com/news/2022-grammys-awards-64th-new-air-show-date-location-las-vegas-april-3-announcement"">has been rescheduled to Sunday, April 3, at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. The below article was updated on Tuesday, Jan. 18, to reflect the new show date and location.

The Recording Academy announced today that it has made significant changes to its Awards process that reflect its ongoing commitment to evolve with the musical landscape and to ensure that the GRAMMY Awards rules and guidelines are transparent and equitable. Among the changes are the elimination of Nominations Review Committees, a reduction in the number of categories in which voters may vote, two GRAMMY Award category additions, and more. These updates are a result of extensive discussions and collaboration over the course of the last year among a special subcommittee of Recording Academy members and elected leaders, and were voted on by the Academy's Board of Trustees. These changes go into effect immediately for the 2022 GRAMMY Awards show, officially known as the 64th GRAMMY Awards, taking place Sunday, April 3. The eligibility period for the 64th GRAMMY Awards is Sept. 1, 2020, through Sept. 30, 2021.

Additional rule amendment proposals will be discussed and voted on at an upcoming Recording Academy meeting and the full rulebook for the 64th GRAMMY Awards will be released in May.

"It's been a year of unprecedented, transformational change for the Recording Academy, and I'm immensely proud to be able to continue our journey of growth with these latest updates to our Awards process," Harvey Mason jr., Chair & Interim President/CEO of the Recording Academy, said. "This is a new Academy, one that is driven to action and that has doubled down on the commitment to meeting the needs of the music community. While change and progress are key drivers of our actions, one thing will always remain — the GRAMMY Award is the only peer-driven and peer-voted recognition in music. We are honored to work alongside the music community year-round to further refine and protect the integrity of the Awards process."

APPROVED RULE AMENDMENTS INCLUDE:

Voting Process Changes

  • Elimination Of Nominations Review Committees In General And Genre Fields

    • Nominations in all of the GRAMMY Award general and genre fields will now be determined by a majority, peer-to-peer vote of voting members of the Recording Academy. Previously, many of the categories within these fields utilized 15-30 highly skilled music peers who represented and voted within their genre communities for the final selection of nominees. With this change, the results of GRAMMY nominations and winners are placed back in the hands of the entire voting membership body, giving further validation to the peer-recognized process. To further support this amendment, the Academy has confirmed that more than 90 percent of its members will have gone through the requalification process by the end of this year, ensuring that the voting body is actively engaged in music creation. Craft committees remain in place (see below for craft category realignment.)
  • Reduction In Number Of Categories Voter May Vote

    • To ensure music creators are voting in the categories in which they are most knowledgeable and qualified, the number of specific genre field categories in which GRAMMY Award Voters may vote has been reduced from 15 to 10. Additionally, those 10 categories must be within no more than three fields. All voters are permitted to vote in the four General Field categories (Record Of The Year, Album Of The Year, Song Of The Year, and Best New Artist). Proposed by a special voting Task Force who brought forth the recommendation, this change serves as an additional safeguard against bloc voting and helps to uphold the GRAMMY Award as a celebration of excellence in music, with specific genre field categories being voted on by the most qualified peers.
  • Craft Category Realignment

    • To better reflect the overlapping peer groups within the voter membership body, six existing craft fields will be consolidated into two fields: Presentation Field and Production Field. In either newly consolidated field, voters would have the ability to choose how many categories they feel qualified to vote in, respecting category vote limits, without being excessively limited by the three-field restriction. This benefits the integrity of these Awards by embracing and utilizing the specializations of the voters, without restricting their choice or contributions due to the field limits imposed by the recent reduction of the number of categories voters may vote in. Field updates are as follows:

      • Package Field, Notes Field and Historical Field renamed and consolidated to Presentation Field

      • Production, Non-Classical Field; Production, Immersive Audio Field; and Production, Classical Field renamed and consolidated to Production Field

New Categories Added

Two new categories have been added, bringing the total number of GRAMMY Award categories to 86:

  • Best Global Music Performance (Global Music Field)

  • Best Música Urbana Album (Latin Music Field)

"The latest changes to the GRAMMY Awards process are prime examples of the Recording Academy's commitment to authentically represent all music creators and ensure our practices are in lock-step with the ever-changing musical environment," said Ruby Marchand, Chief Industry Officer at the Recording Academy. "As we continue to build a more active and vibrant membership community, we are confident in the expertise of our voting members to recognize excellence in music each year."

"As an Academy, we have reaffirmed our commitment to continue to meet the needs of music creators everywhere, and this year's changes are a timely and positive step forward in the evolution of our voting process," said Bill Freimuth, Chief Awards Officer at the Recording Academy. "We rely on the music community to help us to continue to evolve, and we’re grateful for their collaboration and leadership." 

The Recording Academy accepts proposals from members of the music community throughout the year. The Awards & Nominations Committee, comprised of Academy Voting Members of diverse genres and backgrounds, meets annually to review proposals to update Award categories, procedures and eligibility guidelines. The above rule amendments were voted on and passed at a Recording Academy Board of Trustees meeting held on April 30, 2021. For information on the Awards process, visit our GRAMMY Voting Process FAQ page.

The Recording Academy will present the 2022 GRAMMY Awards show on Sunday, April 3, live from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, on the CBS Television Network and stream live and on demand on Paramount+ from 8–11:30 p.m. ET / 5–8:30 p.m. PT. Prior to the telecast, the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony will be streamed live on GRAMMY.com and the Recording Academy's YouTube channel. Additional details about the dates and locations of other official GRAMMY Week events, including the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony, <a href="https://www.musicares.org/person-year "https://www.musicares.org/person-year"">MusiCares' Person of the Year, and the Pre-GRAMMY Gala, are available here.

2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show: Complete Nominations List

Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: How Illenium Went From An "Obsessed" Dance Music Fan To An Arena-Filling DJ & Producer
Illenium

Photo: Brian Ziff

interview

Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: How Illenium Went From An "Obsessed" Dance Music Fan To An Arena-Filling DJ & Producer

With his fourth LP, 'Fallen Embers,' Illenium kicked off a new era that blends his love for electronic music and pop-punk. As he celebrates a GRAMMY nod, the producer looks back on his journey to stardom and shares how the dance genre changed his life.

GRAMMYs/Mar 21, 2022 - 07:37 pm

Growing up, Nick Miller never really listened to dance music. Now, he's one of the genre's most prolific stars, better known as Illenium — and is celebrating a GRAMMY nomination as a result.

Illenium's fourth album, 2021's Fallen Embers, is up for Best Dance/Electronic Music Album at the 2022 GRAMMY Awards. It's a pinnacle moment for Miller, who became "obsessed" with the electronic music world in 2009, launched his career with a self-released EP in 2013, then made his major-label debut in 2016.

Since then, Illenium has put out three more LPs and countless singles, teaming up with fellow dance titans like Gryffin and the Chainsmokers, as well as a variety of singers, from Georgia Ku to Jon Bellion. His versatility is perhaps most apparent on Fallen Embers, which features Tori Kelly, iann dior and Thirty Seconds to Mars, among others.

Though he's already teasing new music — which will debut during Illenium's set at Miami's Ultra Music Festival on March 26 — the producer/DJ feels the next chapter of his career truly began with Fallen Embers. With a GRAMMY nomination to validate his new direction, it may really just be the beginning.

GRAMMY.com sat down with Illenium to discuss the importance of Fallen Embers, how he transitioned from the crowd to the stage, and the role music played in changing — and saving — his life.

What initially made you realize that you were interested in producing — and that you were actually pretty good at it?

I started messing around in GarageBand in high school, and it introduced me to the idea of spending time creating something — even though that stuff back then was really bad. I moved to Colorado, and had some life-changing moments, and I started putting a lot of my time into it. A lot of the encouragement I got from friends, even though it was just mediocre music, was really exciting.

I was writing for music blogs, and I just loved the whole electronic music scene at that time. I would try to create what my idols were doing, and try to learn how they were doing it. I became obsessed, passionate and excited. I got addicted to trying to make songs. The feeling of doing it yourself, and being able to control every aspect of that, was really addicting.

I went to a Red Rocks show in 2012, and seeing that community, especially in Colorado — the Denver-based music scene is really tight-knit and communal, and it's really genuine. It was just really special. It was an experience that really drove me to want to succeed in it.

Was dance music your No. 1 genre growing up?

No, not at all. I didn't listen to much dance music until, like, 2009. I first got into it when I was living in San Francisco. I really liked a lot of the house stuff and trance, and then once I moved to Colorado, it turned into the bass music scene.

I grew up listening to a lot of pop-punk and rock, and my family listens to country a lot. A lot of hip-hop [too]. So I was all over the place in middle school and high school.

That's kind of all I listen to now. I listen to some pop, and a little bit of hip-hop, but it's almost all rock music and pop-punk.

Considering you were a teenager during the pop-punk explosion of the mid-2000s, that makes sense.

Totally. I feel like there's so much emotion and — it's not even aggression, but it's like, intensity, in that kind of music, where it can be really pretty melodically or lyrically, but the instrumental stuff behind it just like, hits. It hits me more than a lot of electronic music does nowadays. So I think that's why I'm transferring it into my type of thing.

Fallen Embers is the first album that doesn't start with "A," but its title still fits into the overall theme that Ashes, Awake and Ascend present. What's the story behind that?

My logo is a phoenix, [because] the imagery behind the phoenix really relates to me and the music that I make, and why I make music in the first place. So my first three albums were kind of this whole birth cycle of a phoenix. They all started with "A," it was a trilogy of that cycle. So Fallen Embers was kind of my take on what pieces were left — the embers fallen from the phoenix throughout that whole journey.

I made that album when I wasn't touring, and that's the first album I made in a long time [that] I wasn't touring, because I've been touring like crazy. It turned out much more calm and much more like a recharge album for me. Lyrically, it [details] the ebbs and flows of a relationship — it doesn't have to be a relationship, but just through finding yourself, and forgiving yourself for making mistakes and moving on.

Sonically, Fallen Embers has more rock elements. It's definitely calmer than Ascend. I love emotional music, so my music is always going to have an emotional aspect to it. That is not going to change. But I don't want to just keep repeating and chasing [the same sound], so now I'm moving very — like, totally — different, post-Fallen Embers. Fallen Embers, for me, was like a farewell, almost. I just wanted to be very clear that that was a trilogy, and now we're departed.

When you announced Fallen Embers, you said this is "the start of a new chapter." So is that kind of what you were talking about?

Yeah. I've been in LA five out of the past six months to start from scratch and write rock songs, and heavy aggressive s<em></em>*, because I feel like I took a break and made music that's kind of calm. Now I'm [going] a little more aggressive and adding some metal aspects.

There's this middle ground of electronic, rock and metal that can be really cool. And I feel like there's a lot of people doing similar stuff, but the songs can be really authentic and healing to people — right now, especially.

You also said this album was "an incredibly personal journey for me." Since it was so personal for you, did you see an even more meaningful impact from these songs?

Yeah. I mean, these past two years have been really challenging for a lot of people, myself included. Especially since shows have come back, you can definitely see in people the excitement to get a release of some sort. And to [just] enjoy — it's hard after a long time of people just going through the motions.

Especially in the electronic music scene, a lot of these people use these shows and the music for their healing and their escape. And that's really important for 'em. So to be able to give them a show and also give them new music, and see how that music has been their kind of crutch this past year, has been really beautiful for me.

You had everyone from Tori Kelly to Angels and Airwaves on Fallen Embers. What goes into finding the right vocalist for a track?

It's a mix. A lot of it is availability-based. When I first am working on a song, especially if it's a demo, it'd be like, "Who would sound good on this?" The "Blame Myself" demo had Emily Warren, who has a really amazing voice, and a very unique tone. So it's hard to fill that.

You get this thing called "demoitis," where you're used to the demo so much, it's hard to separate. But you've got to just find the right vocalist that is gonna bring her own or his own whole attitude to it. And you just kind of have to sit with it for a second because you're so obsessed with the first version.

It's not about, necessarily, the skill of singing. It's a lot of tone. Sonically, how you make a whole song, and you have a vocal in there, you need someone that fits that exact same spot. And that can be really challenging.

For "Paper Thin" with Tom and Angels and Airwaves, that was just a bucket list [thing] for me, I've always wanted to work with him. When we sent it to him, we were like, "They're probably not going to do this." Same with Jared [Leto, Thirty Seconds to Mars' frontman]. I'm the biggest fan of all of the people I collaborated with, so it's really been special.

I feel like a lot of people who aren't as familiar with the dance music scene may assume that producers like you, who aren't on their tracks vocally, might not write them. But you, and people like Kygo and Zedd — all of these huge names in the producer world — have proven that wrong. Do you feel like that's a common misconception?

I think there's always gonna be a misconception of a DJ/producer type thing. I don't think there's any way to get around it, unfortunately. But at the end of the day, it's okay. People [who like] different music have a whole different perspective.

When people see "DJ," they're like, "Oh, like, Vegas DJ. Throw a party!" They have no idea the complexities that go behind that. There are some producers out there that can do insane stuff. It's hard to even start describing that. There's some songs where we start with a guitar, and we write from scratch. It's just about having an ear for what is going to be successful, and also just having an ear of what you enjoy.

In 2018, you shared a really personal story about how music changed your life. Was it a certain song, album or artist that did that for you? Or was it being able to use the music that you were creating as your outlet? Or a combination of both?

It's definitely a mixture of both. When I turned my life around from that time period, it was a mixture of getting so curious about music production, but I was also obsessed with music — I was like, "How do these producers create these things?"

That little thought sparked so much curiosity in me, and [I] wanted to figure out how to implement my love for music and love for different genres. For it to change my life, it had to have all of those aspects — being obsessed with music, loving other people's music, and wanting to create my own.

Doing an action in one of those phases every day is what got me going and got me into the scene, and into my career. But also [made me] confident with myself and feeling like I had some sort of purpose. It was a really healing process for me, because I was kind of a s<em></em>*show before that. I needed something to put all of my energy into, and something that my family supported, and I had friends that supported me. So that was just really cool.

When I was so low, I had no faith in myself at all. You just have no confidence, and you're pretty broken. For you to even have an idea of "I might be good at something" or "I might get good at something if I work hard enough at it and I love it," then it's just full speed ahead.

What does 2012 Nick at Red Rocks think of 2022 Nick being a GRAMMY-nominated producer?

It's just mind-blowing. You know, I told myself when I saw the Red Rocks show in 2012, I was like, "Maybe in 10 years, I'll get to play at Red Rocks." I wasn't even saying headline or anything, just play at Red Rocks. I apparently set a very low goal for myself. [Laughs.]

Constantly having goals set and then reaching them throughout my whole career has been amazing, but it's crazy to think about being a GRAMMY-nominated artist. That is a whole different world that I never even thought — I just got into bass music and EDM, you know? To think of that transition, that's crazy.

We're Probably On An Irreversible Course Into The Metaverse. What Role Will Music Play In It?

Announcement: 2022 GRAMMYs Postponed
2022 GRAMMY Nominations

Graphic by the Recording Academy

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Announcement: 2022 GRAMMYs Postponed

After careful consideration and analysis with city and state officials, health and safety experts, the artist community and our many partners, the Recording Academy and CBS have postponed the 64th Annual GRAMMY Awards Show

GRAMMYs/Jan 5, 2022 - 10:45 pm

The following is a Joint Statement from the Recording Academy and CBS:

“After careful consideration and analysis with city and state officials, health and safety experts, the artist community and our many partners, the Recording Academy and CBS have postponed the 64th Annual GRAMMY Awards Show. The health and safety of those in our music community, the live audience, and the hundreds of people who work tirelessly to produce our show remains our top priority. Given the uncertainty surrounding the Omicron variant, holding the show on January 31st simply contains too many risks. We look forward to celebrating Music’s Biggest Night on a future date, which will be announced soon.” 

2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show: Complete Nominations List

Recording Academy Partners With Top Brands For The 2022 GRAMMYs

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Recording Academy Partners With Top Brands For The 2022 GRAMMYs

The Recording Academy has announced the official marketing partners for the 2022 GRAMMYs. Binance, IBM, Mastercard, OneOf, Grey Goose, Bulova, Hilton, SiriusXM, PEOPLE, FIJI Water, Frontera Wines, and United are all supporters of this year's GRAMMY Awards

GRAMMYs/Mar 29, 2022 - 03:00 pm

The Recording Academy announced today its official marketing partners for 2022 GRAMMYs, officially known as the 64th GRAMMY Awards. Binance, IBM, Mastercard, OneOf, Grey Goose, Bulova, Hilton, SiriusXM, PEOPLE, FIJI Water, Frontera Wines, and United are all supporters of this year's GRAMMY Awards. 

"We are excited to be working alongside these industry-leading brands for the 64th Annual GRAMMY Awards," said Adam Roth, Senior Vice President of Partnerships & Business Development at the Recording Academy. "Music's Biggest Night wouldn't be possible without each and every one of our partners. With their participation, we are able to celebrate the music community and its creators in a new and exciting way that's never been done before. We hope fans watching the show in person and at home can join in on the celebration as we know this will be a night to remember."

Read: Where, What Channel & How To Watch The 2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show

Binance, the Official Cryptocurrency Exchange Partner, is the global blockchain company behind the world's largest cryptocurrency exchange and the first crypto partner of the GRAMMY Awards. Binance will bring Web3 technology solutions to the Academy.

IBM, the Official Cloud & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Partner of the GRAMMYs, is transforming the GRAMMY Live Pre-Show and grammy.com with "GRAMMY Insights with IBM Watson." The AI-powered solution analyzes more than 20 million news stories about nominees, generating surprising and engaging insights about your favorite artists. The insights are shared in real time as nominees walk the red carpet and served up to the artist profile pages on grammy.com, getting music fans closer to the artists they love.

Mastercard, the Official Finance Services Partner, is the preferred payments technology partner of the GRAMMY Awards. Just ahead of Music's Biggest Night, Mastercard is hosting the GRAMMY U Masterclass on April 1 featuring music video director Hannah Lux Davis.

OneOf, the Official NFT Partner, launched the first GRAMMY NFTs for the 64th GRAMMY Awards featuring collections from renowned artists Emonee LaRussa, Andre Oshea and ThankYouX. Collections are dropped each week leading up to the GRAMMY Awards beginning March 7 with the free 64th GRAMMYs NFT. 

GREY GOOSE Vodka, our Official Spirits Partner, developed an all-new signature cocktail for this year's GRAMMYs, the GREY GOOSE Passion Drop. This specialty cocktail, which is a remix of the GREY GOOSE quintessential martini, will be featured at all our signature GRAMMY Week events and highlighted digitally on our GREY GOOSE Hub on GRAMMY.com, a curated destination for themed invites, GREY GOOSE cocktail recipes and watch party ideas. GREY GOOSE has also partnered with three of today's hottest artists (JoJo, Lucky Daye and Tinashe) for a limited digital series, GREY GOOSE x GRAMMYs: Monday Mix that premiered on March 14 and will air every Monday leading up to the GRAMMY Awards telecast. During GRAMMY Week, GREY GOOSE will also be highlighting their new line of vodkas infused with real fruit and botanicals, GREY GOOSE ESSENCES, during the GREY GOOSE ESSENCES x GRAMMYs: Sound Sessions featuring Tinashe. 

Bulova, the Official Timepiece Partner, celebrates GRAMMY-nominated artists with an exclusive watch from their music-inspired GRAMMY Edition watch collection. First-time GRAMMY Award winners will be gifted with a limited-edition "GRAMMY Automatic" watch, infused with musical cues throughout and a "Circle of Fifths" dial design. The meticulously designed timepiece is constructed using the Recording Academy branded proprietary metal "GRAMMIUM."

Hilton, the Official Hotel Partner, is a returning longtime partner and host venue of the inaugural Recording Academy Honors Presented by the Black Music Collective.

SiriusXM, the Official US Radio Partner, is bringing The GRAMMY Channel back for its second year. The limited-run channel will feature a variety of music from this year's nominees across the GRAMMY Awards' 30 Fields, all leading up to the live broadcast of Music's Biggest Night. The GRAMMY Channel will run for a limited time only from March 23 through April 6 on channel 105.

PEOPLE, the Official Magazine Partner, will be broadcasting from the GRAMMYs with a live pre-show. Hosted by Jeremy Parsons and Janine Rubenstein, Red Carpet Live: 64th Annual Grammy Awards will feature interviews with the world's leading performers and nominees. PEOPLE & Entertainment Weekly Red Carpet Live will stream at 6:30 p.m. ET on people.com, ew.com and their social platforms.

FIJI Water, the Official Water Partner, will be on hand at the GRAMMY Red Carpet to hydrate attendees, executives and talent as they stop for photos and interviews with media. FIJI Water will also be the official water brand at the GRAMMY Week events leading up to Music's Biggest Night, ensuring everyone has the chance to enjoy Earth's Finest Water.

Frontera Wines, the Official Wine Partner of the GRAMMY Awards, 12th most powerful wine brand worldwide and #1 Chilean wine brand in the US, will be pouring across select events. The Recording Academy will exclusively work with Frontera to highlight specific Frontera varietals and amplify the partnership through social posts across all channels.

United, the Official Airline Partner, will be providing travel accommodations for the 64th Annual GRAMMY Awards. 

For more information on official GRAMMY Awards partners, please visit:  

binance.com, ibm.com, mastercard.com, oneof.com, greygoose.com, bulova.com, hilton.com, siriusxm.com, people.com, fijiwater.com, fronterawines.com, and united.com

The Recording Academy will present the 2022 GRAMMYs on Sunday, April 3, live from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, on the CBS Television Network and streaming live and on demand on Paramount+ from 8–11:30 p.m. ET / 5–8:30 p.m. PT. Prior to the telecast, the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony will be streamed live on live.grammy.com and the Recording Academy's YouTube channel. Additional details about the dates and locations of other official GRAMMY Week events are available here. Learn more about How To Watch The 2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show and get excited about the full 2022 GRAMMYs nominations list. For more GRAMMYs coverage, updates and breaking news, please visit the Recording Academy's social networks on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter.

2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show: Complete Nominations List