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Anderson .Paak Drops Lead Single, Track List For Upcoming 'Ventura'

Anderson .Paak

Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage/Getty Images

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Anderson .Paak Drops Lead Single, Track List For Upcoming 'Ventura'

The recent first-time GRAMMY winner's fourth studio album is rife with features, including fellow GRAMMY winners Smokey Robinson, Brandy and André 3000

GRAMMYs/Mar 16, 2019 - 12:42 am

Just over a month since taking home his first GRAMMY for "Bubblin," Southern California-bred hip-hop artist Anderson .Paak is ready to give the world some fresh jams. Early this morning, March 15, he shared the upbeat, celebratory lead single, "King James," from his upcoming fourth studio album Ventura, due out April 12.

"King James" is classic .Paak, beginning with horns and a slow, bouncing beat that sets the tone as he opens, "We've been through it all, thought it could be worse." The song, as the name implies, offers a nod to NBA champ LeBron James, who opened a public school in his hometown last fall, as well as to activist and former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

"Now I'm not much for games / But I play for keeps / And we salute King James for using his change / to create some equal opportunities," .Paak raps.

It is the seventh song on the 11-song album, whose track list (check it out below) he revealed on Twitter yesterday. It is rife with hot features across generations and styles; GRAMMY winners André 3000, Smokey Robinson, Lalah Hathaway and Brandy all make appearances. Rising songwriter/rapper/singer Sonyae Elise, who worked with .Paak on 2016's "Room In Here," also has a feature, as well as GRAMMY nominees Jazmine Sullivan and Nate Dogg, who appears posthumously.

.Paak spoke to Billboard about Ventura on Feb. 27, the same day he announced the album and his upcoming tour: "Growing up in Oxnard gave me the grit and the church to find this voice of mine. One town over I went further and found my depth."

He added: "The duality of each place inspired me greatly and from that I made two albums at the exact same time but held one back because that would have been too many songs to perform live for you all! I like ending things on an even number so welcome to Ventura."

Oxnard, his third studio album, was the third installment of .Paak's "beach trilogy," an idea he envisioned back in high school in Oxnard, Calif. His first LP was titled Venice and released in October 2014. All three names are nods to cities near Los Angeles, Calif.

Earlier this year at the 61st GRAMMY Awards, he earned his first GRAMMY win for Best Rap Performance for "Bubblin," a non-album single he dropped in May 2018. He was first nominated at the 59th GRAMMY Awards for Best New Artist and for Best Urban Contemporary Album for his sophomore effort, Malibu.

Following the release of Ventura, .Paak will be embarking on the Best Teef In The Game Tour, with dates across Europe and Northern America. The North American leg kicks off on May 17 in Nashville, Tenn. after several U.S. festival appearances, including Coachella.

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10 Must-See Moments From The 2023 GRAMMYs: Beyoncé Makes History, Hip-Hop Receives An Epic Tribute, Bad Bunny Brings The Puerto Rican Heat
Beyoncé accepting her 32nd GRAMMY at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

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10 Must-See Moments From The 2023 GRAMMYs: Beyoncé Makes History, Hip-Hop Receives An Epic Tribute, Bad Bunny Brings The Puerto Rican Heat

The 2023 GRAMMYs marked a triumphant — and historic — return to Los Angeles' Crypto.com Arena, where modern superstars and living legends came together for a memorable celebration of music in all its forms.

GRAMMYs/Feb 6, 2023 - 03:20 pm

A wide, uplifting tapestry of sounds was saluted and rewarded during the 2023 GRAMMYs. The telecast's pluralistic approach delivered a view of the present as a time of musical splendor while also celebrating its past — from hip-hop's legacy, to Latin's cultural influence, to pop's boundary-pushing stars.

Between history-making wins from Beyoncé and Kim Petras, a major victory by a young jazz sensation, and celebratory performances honoring greats, there was plenty to be reveled both on and off the GRAMMY stage. Below, take a look at the highlights of another memorable edition of Music's Biggest Night.

Bad Bunny Sticks Close To His Caribbean Roots

After global star Bad Bunny celebrated a year of extraordinary achievements — both artistic and commercial — the Puerto Rican tastemaker used his GRAMMYs performance to celebrate his Caribbean roots.

Benito could have picked an obvious selection, like the crowd-pleasing single "Tití Me Preguntó." Instead, he focused on the soulful roots of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic by performing electrifying renditions of "El Apagón" and "Después de la Playa." 

Bad Bunny has demonstrated time and again a gift for reinventing Latin genres. And yet, "Después de la Playa" kept its insanely syncopated beats and feverish brass section faithful to traditional merengue. The late Dominican icon Johnny Ventura would have been proud.

The Fans Receive A Much-Deserved Spotlight

The awards, record deals and critical raves are indispensable elements of stardom. But in the end, it is the contributions of average fans that sustain a career. With that in mind, the GRAMMYs organized a roundtable with 10 studious fans, each making a case for their favorite performer to win the Album Of The Year award. 

To their delight — and genuine surprise — host Trevor Noah invited them on stage for the coveted award, asking one of the most devoted fans in Harry Styles' pack to announce his win. The two shared a joyous embrace before she handed him his golden gramophone, serving as a touching closing reminder that the fans mean everything.

The Magic Of Motown Becomes Transformational

A brisk tribute to Motown co-founder Berry Gordy and musical genius Smokey Robinson — three songs, augmented by an inspired Stevie Wonder — proved that words will never be enough to capture the label's contribution to pop culture. A factory of beautiful dreams, Motown gave us a string of timeless hits that combine aural poetry with propulsive rhythms, honeyed hooks and virtuoso arrangements. Seeing the 82 year-old Robinson perform the 1967 classic "The Tears of a Clown" was one of the evening's most dazzling moments. (The performance also featured Wonder's rendition of the Temptations' "The Way You Do The Things You Do" and a duet with country singer Chris Stapleton on Wonder's own "Higher Ground.")

Honoring The Past Shows The Future Is Bright

2022 was a year of artistic triumph, but also of tremendous loss. The In Memoriam segment of the telecast was sobering, also honoring performers who are lesser known in the United States but definitely worthy of a mention — such as Brazil's Erasmo Carlos and Argentina's Marciano Cantero

It began with a stately rendition of "Coal Miner's Daughter" by Kacey Musgraves in tribute to country legend Loretta Lynn, then continued with Quavo and Maverick City Music honoring Migos' Takeoff, ending with an homage to Fleetwood Mac's Christine McVie from Sheryl Crow, Bonnie Raitt and Mick Fleetwood. Many artists were lost during the past 12 months, but their music lives on.

A Queen Breaks Records — To A Disco Beat

Beyoncé was allegedly stuck in traffic when she won her third GRAMMY of the evening — Best R&B Song for the joyful single "CUFF IT" — which, as Trevor Noah noted, put her one win away from making GRAMMY history. Luckily, by the time her name was announced for that record-setting feat, she was in attendance — and very much in shock.

Her seventh studio LP, RENAISSANCE, won Best Dance/Electronic Album. The win put her GRAMMY total at 32, marking the most wins of all time. Visibly emotional, Beyoncé first took a deep breath and said "I'm trying to just receive this night"; before heading off stage, she made sure to honor the queer dance pioneers who inspired the album, an exuberant tribute to classic dance format. 

Hip-Hop Shines As A National Treasure

2023 marks the 50th anniversary of hip-hop — so, naturally, the GRAMMYs put together perhaps the most legendary celebration possible. Featuring the Roots, Run-DMC, Queen Latifah, and many, many more, the nearly 15-minute performance highlighted the genre's influence from past to present.

The parade of legends tracing the history of the genre was breathtaking. From Grandmaster Flash ("The Message") and De La Soul ("Buddy") to Missy Elliott ("Lose Control") and Lil Uzi Vert ("Just Wanna Rock"), the extensive medley gave hip-hop its rightful place of honor as the most compelling musical movement of the past 50 years.

The Art Of Songwriting Stands The Test Of Time

One of the show's most endearing images was the utter shock on Bonnie Raitt's face when she was announced as the winner of the Song Of The Year GRAMMY — perhaps because her competition featured the likes of Beyoncé, Adele and Harry Styles. "This is an unreal moment," she said. "The Academy has given me so much support, and appreciates the art of songwriting as much as I do." 

In retrospect, Raitt's win shouldn't surprise anyone who is aware of her superb musicianship — and her 15 GRAMMYs to show for it. A rootsy, vulnerable song, "Just Like That" is the title track of her eighteenth studio album; the song also took home the GRAMMY for Best American Roots Song earlier in the evening.

Lizzo Dedicates Her Grammy Win to Prince (And Beyoncé)

By the time Record Of The Year was announced, the prodigiously gifted Lizzo had already brought the GRAMMY house down with rousing performances of the funky "About Damn Time" and the anthemic "Special." But clearly the best was yet to come, as the former track took home one of the night's biggest honors.

As Lizzo began her speech, she paid homage to Prince, who both served as an idol and a mentor to the star. "When we lost Prince, I decided to dedicate my life to making positive music," she said, going on to explain that while she first felt misunderstood for her relentless positivity, mainstream music has begun to accept it — as evidenced by her win for "About Damn Time." 

Before leaving the stage, she made sure to give one more idol a shout-out: Beyoncé. "You changed my life," Lizzo said, reflecting on seeing the "BREAK MY SOUL" singer when she was in 5th grade. "You sang that gospel medley, and the way you made me feel, I was like, 'I wanna make people feel this way with my music.' So thank you so much."

It only takes one listen to the wondrous voice of young Bronx singer Samara Joy to understand that she follows the same path once walked by Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald. Joy's second album, Linger Awhile, includes atmospheric versions of such classic nuggets as "Misty," "'Round Midnight" and "Someone To Watch Over Me." 

The rising star was already a winner going into the telecast, as Joy took home the golden gramophone for Best Jazz Vocal Album in the Premiere Ceremony. But when she beat out mainstream hitmakers like Latto, Anitta and Måneskin for the coveted Best New Artist GRAMMY, Joy not only set her place in the jazz firmament — it hinted that the genre may be ripe for a revival.

The Pop Concept Album Lives On

It's not only the stunning beauty of its melodies, and the pristine warmth of the production. Harry's House is a special album partly because of its vaguely conceptual sheen — the pervasive feeling that the 13 songs within are interconnected, an intimate journey into the singer's creative soul. 

At the telecast, Styles performed an ethereal reading of his luminous mega-hit "As It Was." His well-deserved win for Album Of The Year confirmed that it's perfectly valid to mix accessible pop with a sophisticated unifying theme — and if you do it really right, you may just win a GRAMMY.

Check out the complete list of winners and nominees at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Stevie Wonder Is Bringing A Special Performance With Smokey Robinson & Chris Stapleton To The 2023 GRAMMYs
(L-R) Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Chris Stapleton

Photos courtesy of the Recording Academy

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Stevie Wonder Is Bringing A Special Performance With Smokey Robinson & Chris Stapleton To The 2023 GRAMMYs

The 2023 GRAMMYs will feature a special performance by Stevie Wonder, where he will perform three classic tunes, including two duets with fellow Motown legend Smokey Robinson and country star Chris Stapleton.

GRAMMYs/Feb 3, 2023 - 07:09 pm

Stevie Wonder isn't just a 25-time GRAMMY winner; he's one of the most beloved talents in American music. And on Music's Biggest Night, it's the Recording Academy's honor to broadcast a special performance by the titanic singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist.

At the 2023 GRAMMYs, viewers will behold a broadcast of Wonder singing three classic hits, starting with the Temptations' "The Way You Do the Things You Do," featuring the R&B vocal group WanMore.

Next, Wonder will perform Smokey Robinson's "Tears of a Clown" with Robinson himself — one of MusiCares' two Persons Of The Year for 2023, the other being Motown founder Berry Gordy.

Wonder will finish off this special performance — drawn from the 2023 MusiCares Persons Of The Year Gala — with his hit "Higher Ground," from his classic 1973 album Innervisions.

Joining him will be country singer/songwriter Chris Stapleton — an eight-time GRAMMY winner in his own right, who's nominated this year for Best Country Song for co-writing Willie Nelson's "I'll Love You Till The Day I Die," from 2022's A Beautiful Time.

The 2023 GRAMMYs air Sunday, Feb. 5, from Los Angeles' Crypto.com Arena, and it will broadcast live on the CBS Television Network and stream live and on-demand on Paramount+ at 8-11:30 p.m. ET / 5-8:30 p.m. PT. Be sure to log into live.GRAMMY.com for the full experience.

Don't miss what's sure to be a transfixing performance by an American musical giant and two of his fellow greats!

2023 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Complete Nominees List

GRAMMY Style Edit: Stylist Zerina Akers Reflects On Her "Timeless" GRAMMY Looks For Beyoncé, Jazmine Sullivan & Chloe X Halle
Zerina Akers

Photo: Edwig Henson

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GRAMMY Style Edit: Stylist Zerina Akers Reflects On Her "Timeless" GRAMMY Looks For Beyoncé, Jazmine Sullivan & Chloe X Halle

In this episode of GRAMMY Style Edit, Zerina Akers revisits her recently styled looks at the GRAMMYs, including Beyoncé's outfit for her history-making night in 2021 and Jazmine Sullivan's suit for her first GRAMMY win in 2022.

GRAMMYs/Feb 2, 2023 - 09:21 pm

For award-winning stylist and costume designer Zerina Akers, fashion is the purest way to express our ideal selves — and she gets to help superstars like Beyoncé do just that.

In this episode of GRAMMY Style Edit, Akers breaks down a few of her styled looks in recent GRAMMY history. She's the mastermind behind Beyoncé's iconic black leather and gold ensemble from the 2021 GRAMMY Awards, a look Akers describes as a "refreshing take on fashion" to coincide with the singer's historical winning moment

Akers has served as the R&B diva's personal stylist since 2014, and attributes her knack for creating memorable style moments — especially for performances, her personal favorite thing to style — to "the School of Beyonce." (She was the costume designer for Beyoncé's GRAMMY-winning film Black Is King, which won Akers an Emmy in 2021.) 

In her everyday life, Akers defines her style as androgynous, with an added eclectic twist on wardrobe basics. She utilizes this approach in her work with Jazmine Sullivan, who Akers styled in a tribal-print black leather suit at the 2022 GRAMMY Awards, and Chloe x Halle, who wore sleek, structural black gowns during their 2019 GRAMMY performance.

"GRAMMY styling, specifically, is always so special," Akers says. "It's important for me to approach it with a timeless sensibility. Will this stand the test of time? Will these images, in 20 years, still be fab?"

Press play on this video to learn more about Zerina Akers' genius behind some of her most recent GRAMMY looks, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Style Edit.

A Timeline Of Beyoncé's GRAMMY Moments, From Her First Win With Destiny's Child to Making History With 'Renaissance'

Read The 2023 GRAMMYs Program Book In Its Entirety: Berry & Smokey, Every General Field Nominee & So Much More

Photo courtesy of the Recording Academy

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Read The 2023 GRAMMYs Program Book In Its Entirety: Berry & Smokey, Every General Field Nominee & So Much More

Below, enjoy a digital version of the 2023 GRAMMYs Program Book, which will be distributed at Music's Biggest Night — and don't forget to watch it on CBS and live.grammy.com on Feb. 5 at 4pm PT/7pm ET!

GRAMMYs/Jan 30, 2023 - 10:22 pm

In so many ways, the 2023 GRAMMYs will represent music's past, present, and future.

Not only will the MusiCares Persons Of The Year event honor two giants of Motown — Berry Gordy and Smokey Robinson — but the Premiere Ceremony and show proper will be a clear reflection of who's shifting music right now.

(And as far as emerging acts who are nominated for golden gramophones? That's the future right there.)

All three have been captured in the 2023 GRAMMYs Program Book, a lavish text distributed to attendees at the ceremony in just under a week.

Read the 2023 GRAMMYs program book in full.

But don't forget, the book just contains the lead-up to the ceremony — nobody knows what will happen! To be the first to know, watch the 2023 GRAMMYs on CBS and Paramount+ on Sunday, Feb. 5, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. Make sure to head to live.GRAMMY.com on GRAMMY night for an all-access pass to experience the 2023 GRAMMYs in full via exclusive interviews and never-before-seen content.

Enjoy the 2023 GRAMMYs Program Book, and we'll see you at Music's Biggest Night!

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