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Watch The 2022 Nominees For Best Song Written For Visual Media Nominees At The 2023 GRAMMY Awards

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Watch The 2022 Nominees For Best Song Written For Visual Media Nominees At The 2023 GRAMMY Awards

Beyoncé, Taylor Swift, Lady Gaga, Jessy Wilson and Angelique Kidjo, Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell, and Lin-Manuel Miranda and the cast of 'Encanto' compete for the 2022 Best Song Written for Visual Media.

GRAMMYs/Nov 18, 2022 - 04:29 pm

From dramatic biopic to heartwarming animation, the expansive arc of storytelling possible in modern cinema necessitates an equally impressive continuum of memorable music. The artists nominated for Best Song Written for Visual Media at the 2023 GRAMMY Awards demonstrate that far-reaching potential, and one song will soundtrack yet another memorable moment by taking home this year’s GRAMMY.

The songwriters and performers behind this year’s nominees demonstrate just how heart-rending this year in visual media has been: Beyoncé for "Be Alive" from King Richard, Taylor Swift for From Where the Crawdads Sing, Lady Gaga from Top Gun: Maverick, Jessy Wilson and Angélique Kidjo from The Woman King, Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell writing for fictional boy band 4*Town for Turning Red, and Lin-Manuel Miranda writing for the cast of Encanto.

As the 65th GRAMMY Awards near — airing on CBS on Feb. 5, 2023 — learn more about who is competing to take home Best Song Written for Visual Media by revisiting this year's nominees below.

View the complete list of 65th GRAMMY Award nominees across all 91 categories.

Beyoncé — "Be Alive" [From King Richard

Beyoncé & Darius Scott Dixson, songwriters

Beyoncé tapped deeply into the emotional core of King Richard, a biopic centered on Richard Williams’ quest to coach his daughters Serena and Venus toward tennis greatness. Undoubtedly, the story of a father helping push young Black women to achieve the unparalleled greatness within them — and the hard work, struggle, pain, and deep love that comes with reaching that peak — resonated with the pop star, resulting in a steely rhythm and muscly vocality that refuse to bend to immense pressure.

Writing with Darius Scott Dixson (who also records as Dixson and has produced and written for artists like Justin Bieber, Chance the Rapper, and Kirk Franklin), Beyoncé thrives in the determination, joy, and pride in Vens and Serena’s story — barrelling past the hurdles set in their path and exalting Black excellence.

Taylor Swift — "Carolina" [From Where the Crawdads Sing]

Taylor Swift, songwriter

Taylor Swift’s contribution to the soundtrack for southern murder mystery Where the Crawdads Sing draws from the pop star’s folk-indebted era — though the roots of that folk sink into murky swampwater.

Swift embodies Daisy Edgar-Jones’ protagonist, the pop star reaching her smokiest depths as the track builds through light banjo plucking, low-slung mandolin, and synth string beds, the pop star reaches her smokiest depths. The lyrics offer hints of trouble that never quite come into clarity — the talk of scars, sin, and ghosts buried in the sand or washed away in the sea. The National’s Aaron Dessner helped Swift fulfill her vision for Folklore and Evermore, and here his deft production helps float the chilled melody down the icy water.

Lady Gaga — "Hold My Hand" [From Top Gun: Maverick]

Bloodpop® & Stefani Germanotta, songwriters

Top Gun: Maverick returned eager fans to the epic action films of the ‘80s, and with "Hold My Hand" Lady Gaga did the same for arena rock power ballads. Buttressed by skyscraping synth bursts and thunderous percussion, Gaga’s grand vocals soar as majestically as any Tom Cruise-piloted jet.

In fact, the film’s star himself agrees that "Hold My Hand" hits inspirational heights: "Gaga came in with this song… [and] it became the heartbeat of the film," Cruise said in an interview with CinemaBlend. Co-written and co-produced by Bloodpop® (aka Michael Tucker, who also contributed to Gaga’s Joanne and Chromatica), the track is a testament to Gaga’s unflinching ear for pop bombast, her vocals matched at the song’s conclusion by a rippling guitar solo before everything fades into the sunset.

Jessy Wilson feat. Angelique Kidjo — "Keep Rising (The Woman King)" [From The Woman King

Angelique Kidjo, Jeremy Lutito & Jessy Wilson, songwriters

When Jessy Wilson first recorded the bulk of "Keep Rising," she didn’t know the song would close a film about a force of female warriors protecting the West African kingdom of Dahomey in the early 19th century. "When I wrote the song, I was talking to Black people … [but] I'm also talking to myself," she told NPR. "When will we be seen as enough? When will I be seen as enough?"

That passion and burn resonate in the booming percussion and circular piano riff, Wilson powering the song’s core with a regal fire. Angelique Kidjo provides the perfect counterpart to Wilson: the legendary vocalist-activist hails from Benin, the modern location of what was once Dahomey. The track lowers to a simmer before her undeniable voice pierces through, leading Wilson back to a full roar befitting the cinematic warriors.

4Town, Jordan Fisher, Finneas O’Connell, Josh Levi, Topher Ngo, Grayson Villanueva — "Nobody Like U" [From Turning Red]

Billie Eilish & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters

Billie Eilish and her brother Finneas O’Connell were tasked with creating boy band material worthy of being idolized not only by the film’s characters, but by the audience of the Disney/Pixar film Turning Red. The resulting 4*Town lives up to that challenge, particularly the sugary, crushable "Nobody Like U" — the lyrical insistence of love and support equally suited to any teenager’s dream of love as to the friendships at the film’s core.

O’Connell himself voices one of the five animated pop stars, while actor/singer Jordan Fisher’s turn as the oh-so-sensitive Robaire provides this song’s chorus. While hopes for a full 4*Town record someday may need to sit on the shelf while Eilish and O’Connell continue their own respective star turns, "Nobody Like U" will prove eminently replayable in the meantime.

Carolina Gaitán - La Gaita, Mauro Castillo, Adassa, Rhenzy Feliz, Diane Guerrero, Stephanie Beatriz & Encanto Cast — "We Don’t Talk About Bruno" [From Encanto]

Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter

The latest in a long line of beloved Disney animated musicals, Encanto has irrevocably been lodged in the ears of countless children and their parents — but songs like the salsa pop "We Don’t Talk About Bruno" are cleverly crafted and compelling enough for any listener. The track details the Madrigal black sheep, each family member sharing memories or rumors of an uncle who’s been missing for years after a dark, mysterious event. As each vocalist takes their turn, the track melts from subtle electronic murmur to pizzicato sparkle, the long story told in a winding musical river.

"Everyone sings the same chord progression with a totally different rhythm and a totally different cadence," Miranda says in a press release announcing the song’s release, a brilliant way for each of the Madrigals (and their voice actors) to get a moment to shine and reveal their character.

2023 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Complete Nominees List

17 Love Songs That Have Won GRAMMYs: "I Will Always Love You," "Drunk In Love" & More
(L-R) Usher and Alicia Keys during the Super Bowl LVIII halftime show.

Photo: L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Review-Journal/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

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17 Love Songs That Have Won GRAMMYs: "I Will Always Love You," "Drunk In Love" & More

Over the GRAMMYs' 66-year history, artists from Frank Sinatra to Ed Sheeran have taken home golden gramophones for their heartfelt tunes. Take a look at some of the love songs that have won GRAMMYs.

GRAMMYs/Feb 14, 2024 - 09:42 pm

Editor's Note: This is an update to a story from 2017.

Without heart-bursting, world-shifting love songs, music wouldn't be the same. There are countless classic and chart-topping hits dedicated to love, and several of them have won GRAMMYs.

We're not looking at tunes that merely deal with shades of love or dwell in heartbreak. We're talking out-and-out, no-holds-barred musical expressions of affection — the kind of love that leaves you wobbly at the knees.

No matter how you're celebrating Valentine's Day (or not), take a look at 18 odes to that feel-good, mushy-gushy love that have taken home golden gramophones over the years.

Frank Sinatra, "Strangers In The Night"

Record Of The Year / Best Vocal Performance, Male, 1967

Ol' Blue Eyes offers but a glimmer of hope for the single crowd on Valentine's Day, gently ruminating about exchanging glances with a stranger and sharing love before the night is through.

Willie Nelson, "Always On My Mind"

Best Country Vocal Performance, Male, 1983

In this cover, Nelson sings to the woman in his life, lamenting over those small things he should have said and done, but never took the time. Don't find yourself in the same position this Valentine's Day.

Lionel Richie, "Truly"

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male, 1983

"Truly" embodies true dedication to a loved one, and it's delivered with sincerity from the king of '80s romantic pop — who gave life to the timeless love-song classics "Endless Love," "Still" and "Three Times A Lady."

Roy Orbison, "Oh, Pretty Woman"

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male, 1991

Orbison captures the essence of encountering a lovely woman for the first time, and offers helpful one-liners such as "No one could look as good as you" and "I couldn't help but see … you look as lovely as can be." Single men, take notes.

Whitney Houston, "I Will Always Love You"

Record Of The Year, Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, 1994

Houston passionately delivers a message of love, remembrance and forgiveness on her version of this song, which was written by country sweetheart Dolly Parton and first nominated for a GRAMMY in 1982.

Celine Dion, "My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme From Titanic)"  

Record Of The Year, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, 1999

This omnipresent theme song from the 1997 film Titanic was propelled to the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 as the story of Jack and Rose (played by Leonardo DiCaprio and GRAMMY winner Kate Winslet) swept the country.

Shania Twain, "You're Still The One"

Best Female Country Vocal Performance, Best Country Song, 1999

Co-written with producer and then-husband Mutt Lange, Twain speaks of beating the odds with love and perseverance in lyrics such as, "I'm so glad we made it/Look how far we've come my baby," offering a fresh coat of optimism for couples of all ages.

Usher & Alicia Keys, "My Boo"

Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocals, 2005

"There's always that one person that will always have your heart," sings Usher in this duet with Keys, taking the listener back to that special first love. The chemistry between the longtime friends makes this ode to “My Boo” even more heartfelt, and the love was still palpable even 20 years later when they performed it on the Super Bowl halftime show stage.

Bruno Mars, "Just The Way You Are"

Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, 2011

Dating advice from Bruno Mars: If you think someone is beautiful, you should tell them every day. Whether or not it got Mars a date for Valentine's Day, it did get him a No. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100.

Cee Lo Green & Melanie Fiona, "Fool For You" 

Best Traditional R&B Performance, 2012

It's a far cry from his previous GRAMMY-winning song, "F*** You," but "Fool For You" had us yearning for "that deep, that burning/ That amazing unconditional, inseparable love."

Justin Timberlake, "Pusher Love Girl" 

Best R&B Song, 2014

Timberlake is so high on the love drug he's "on the ceiling, baby." Timberlake co-wrote the track with James Fauntleroy, Jerome Harmon and Timbaland, and it's featured on his 2013 album The 20/20 Experience, which flew high to No. 1 on the Billboard 200.

Beyoncé & Jay-Z, "Drunk In Love"

Best R&B Performance / Best R&B Song, 2015

While "Drunk In Love" wasn't the first love song that won Beyoncé and Jay-Z a GRAMMY — they won two GRAMMYs for "Crazy In Love" in 2004 — it is certainly the sexiest. This quintessential 2010s bop from one of music's most formidable couples captures why their alliance set the world's hearts aflame (and so did their steamy GRAMMYs performance of it).

Ed Sheeran, "Thinking Out Loud"

Song Of The Year / Best Pop Solo Performance, 2016

Along with his abundant talent, Sheeran's boy-next-door charm is what rocketed him to the top of the pop ranks. And with swooning lyrics and a waltzing melody, "Thinking Out Loud" is proof that he's a modern-day monarch of the love song.

Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper, "Shallow"

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance / Best Song Written For Visual Media, 2019

A Star is Born's cachet has gone up and down with its various remakes, but the 2018 iteration was a smash hit. Not only is that thanks to moving performances from Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper, but particularly thanks to their impassioned, belt-along duet "Shallow."

H.E.R. & Daniel Caesar, "Best Part"

Best R&B Performance, 2019

"If life is a movie/ Know you're the best part." Who among us besotted hasn't felt their emotions so widescreen, so thunderous? Clearly, H.E.R. and Daniel Caesar have — and they poured that feeling into the GRAMMY-winning ballad "Best Part."

Kacey Musgraves, "Butterflies"

Best Country Solo Performance, 2019

As Musgraves' Album Of The Year-winning LP Golden Hour shows, the country-pop star can zoom in or out at will, capturing numberless truths about the human experience. With its starry-eyed lyrics and swirling production, "Butterflies" perfectly encapsulates the flutter in your stomach that love can often spark.

Dan + Shay & Justin Bieber, "10,000 Hours"

Best Country Duo/Group Performance, 2021

When country hook-meisters Dan + Shay teamed up with pop phenom Justin Bieber, their love song powers were unstoppable. With more than 1 billion Spotify streams alone, "10,000 Hours" has become far more than an ode to just their respective wives; it's an anthem for any lover.

Lovesick Or Sick Of Love: Listen To GRAMMY.com's Valentine's Day Playlist Featuring Taylor Swift, Doja Cat, Playboi Carti, Olivia Rodrigo, FKA Twigs & More

Who Is Rhiannon Giddens? 3 Things To Know About The Banjoist & Violist On Beyoncé’s "Texas Hold ‘Em"
Rhiannon Giddens

Photo: Ebru Yildiz

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Who Is Rhiannon Giddens? 3 Things To Know About The Banjoist & Violist On Beyoncé’s "Texas Hold ‘Em"

Rhiannon Giddens has been esteemed in various folk circles for years — and her appearance on Beyoncé’s "TEXAS HOLD ‘EM" just broke her into the mainstream. Here are three things to know about the eclectic singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist.

GRAMMYs/Feb 13, 2024 - 06:40 pm

After the club-storming Renaissance, its Act II begins with an unexpected sound: a burble of banjo, later joined by flowing viola. Welcome to "TEXAS HOLD ‘EM," one of two advance singles from Beyoncé’s forthcoming album, along with "16 CARRIAGES."

Beyoncé’s recently announced Act II promises to be an immersion into country music — which is both a fresh aesthetic and one deeply rooted to her Texan upbringing. The 32-time GRAMMY Winner has spoken about the "overlooked history of the American Black cowboy" and nodded to the culture with a Western getup at the 2024 GRAMMYs.

All of this is a completely natural fit for Rhiannon Giddens, who played said fiddle and viola on "TEXAS HOLD ‘EM."

"The beginning is a solo riff on my minstrel banjo — and my only hope is that it might lead a few more intrepid folks into the exciting history of the banjo," Giddens explained on Instagram. "I used to say many times as soon as Beyoncé puts the banjo on a track my job is done.

"Well, I didn’t expect the banjo to be mine," she continued. "And I know darn well my job isn’t done, but today is a pretty good day."

The "job" defines Giddens. Sure, she may be completely new to certain contingents of the Beyhive, but the two-time GRAMMY winner and 10-time nominee’s been on the scene for almost two decades.

Since making her mark with the Carolina Chocolate Drops in the mid-aughts, Giddens has forged a singular legacy. She’s not only a purveyor of traditional musics, but as an investigator of the racial and cultural cross-currents that forged our modern-day understanding — and misunderstanding — of Americana.

At the 2024 GRAMMYs, Giddons was nominated for two golden gramophones — for Best Americana Album (You’re the One) and Best American Roots Performance ("You Louisiana Man"). You’re the One was her first album of all-original material; in that regard, these noms show that a new, exciting chapter for Giddens is just beginning.

Here are five things to know about the artist who just played "TEXAS HOLD ‘EM" with Queen Bee.

Her Interrogation Of Black Music History Is Indispensable

Giddens has worked in a diverse array of fields, including opera, documentary, ballet, podcasting, and more. Her mission? To explore "difficult and unknown chapters of American history" through musical lenses, like the evolution of the banjo from Africa to Appalachia.

"In order to understand the history of the banjo, and the history of bluegrass music, we need to move beyond the narrative we've inherited," she’s stated. Elsewhere, she noted, "People seem ready for a more in-depth idea of folk music, culture and history.

Which extends beyond merely other people’s stories — but to her own.

…And It Led Directly To You’re The One

Speaking to GRAMMY.com about her GRAMMY-nominated first album of original material, Giddens was quick to note that "autobiography" doesn’t hit the mark.

"It doesn't express how I feel… they're still songs, and it's still a performance," Giddens said. "I'd say I'm drawing a little bit more from my experience, but I had to draw from my experience to write other people's stories.

"There's emotions that I feel that I then translate into these other stories," she added, "so I don't think this record is completely different from that."

She’s Made Killer Appearances With Paul Simon

Paul Simon’s ended his touring years, but he does make sporadic appearances, including at 2022’s "Homeward Bound: A GRAMMY Salute to the Songs of Paul Simon."

There, they performed a version of his epochal "American Tune," where he changed the words in nuanced ways as relates to the American origin story — and he enlisted Giddens to sing it with him.

"He didn't have to do nothing but sit back and collect his checks," Giddens told GRAMMY.com. "He made a statement with that song, and I don't want to take that away from him. I didn't change those words; he changed those words."

Where will Giddens go from her star turn with Bey? Wherever it might be, we’ll feel — and learn — something profound, one banjo strum at a time.

On You’re The One, Rhiannon Giddens’ Craft Finds A Natural Outgrowth: Songwriting

Everything We Know About Beyoncé’s New Album, ‘Act II’: Two New Singles, A Shift To Country & More
Beyoncé at the 2024 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy 

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Everything We Know About Beyoncé’s New Album, ‘Act II’: Two New Singles, A Shift To Country & More

Beyoncé released two new singles and announced a forthcoming new album after teasing the new music during a Verizon 5G commercial during the 2024 Super Bowl. Here's everything we know about the 'act ii' album dropping March 29.

GRAMMYs/Feb 12, 2024 - 05:23 am

“OK, they ready: drop the new music.” With those seven words, Beyoncé announced new music during a commercial for Verizon 5G during the 2024 Super Bowl.

As the Beyhive clamored frantically to discover what, exactly, their queen was teasing, the answer soon became clear as the superstar unveiled two new tracks titled “TEXAS HOLD ‘EM” and “16 CARRIAGES.”

But that’s not all! The two new songs not only follow Beyoncé’s seventh album, Renaissance, and her mega-successful concert tour of the same name, but also build on the single “MY HOUSE” from last year. The dual ditties appear to be components of a larger project, potentially marking the next phase of Beyoncé's ongoing Renaissance.

Below, GRAMMY.com rounded up everything there is to know about Queen Bey’s surprise drop and what cards she may have up her sleeve.

Beyoncé’s Long-Awaited Country Era Is Upon Us

While Beyonce’s Super Bowl LVIII commercial paid homage to 2016’s Lemonade, introduced the world to the possibilities of "Beyonc-AI" and even sent her to space, the surprise singles signal a new direction for the living legend into bonafide country territory. 

“TEXAS HOLD ‘EM” is a twangy, two-stepping joint addictively tailor-made for a night of line dancing and lassoing, with Bey singing, “This ain’t Texas, ain’t no hold ‘em / So lay your cards down, down, down, down / So park your Lexus and throw your keys up / Stick around, ‘round, ‘round, ‘round, round” before she flirts, “And I’ll be damned if I can’t slow dance with you / Come pour some sugar on me honey, too / It’s a real live boogie and a real live hoe-down / Don’t be a b–ch, come take it to the floor now.”

Meanwhile, “16 CARRIAGES” balances out the yee-haw groove of its jauntier sibling by turning out a slow-burning power ballad as Bey spins a tale of lost innocence and grinding away in the name of a better life. “Sixteen carriages drivin’ away while I / Watch them ride with my dreams away to the / Summer sunset on a holy night on a / Lone back road, all the / Tears I fight,” she rhapsodizes over sparse acoustic guitar before slide guitar and pounding percussion crash over her gentle vocals like a wave.

It All Started with a Super Bowl Ad

Beyoncé started all this ruckus with an epic Super Bowl commercial for Verizon. The ad began with the two-time halftime show headliner filming a music video for her 2023 one-off “My House.” Clad in a red sequined ensemble and surrounded by faceless backup dancers in the same shade of scarlet, Bey bursts from a giant house (also red) as she pronounces, “Who they came to see? Me! Who rep like me, don't make me get up out of my seat. OK!”

From there, Beyoncé hatches a plan with Tony Hale to break both the internet and the service provider’s 5G with a number of viral stunts — including starting her own “Hold Up”-inspired lemonade stand (baseball bat and yellow gown included), climbing to the top the Sphere in Las Vegas, starring in a Bey-ified Barbie redux titled "Bar-Bey"and announcing her uncontested run as “Beyoncé of the United States.” You’ve got our vote, BOTUS!

This One’s For the “Daddy Lessons” Fans

Of course, it’s a known fact that Beyoncé can sing, well, literally anything, but the sonic shift is particularly gratifying for fans of her zydeco-tinged cut “Daddy Lessons” from 2016 or the even more countrified version she recorded with Dixie Chicks after performing the Lemonade fan-favorite with the group at the 2016 CMA Awards.

The Songs Herald the Arrival of Act II

The two tracks aren’t just a one-off, either. The landing page of Beyoncé’s official website updated once the songs were released into the world, promising, “act ii…3.29.” The promise of a second act most likely refers to the megastar’s GRAMMY-winning album Renaissance, which has been billed as “Act I” since its release in the summer of 2022. 

Many fans suspected a full visual album might be the second act of the house-inspired era, but it appears that much like Beyoncé herself, the Renaissance won’t be limited to a single genre.

Could Visuals (Finally) Be on Their Way?

Along with the pair of singles, Beyoncé dropped a teaser for “TEXAS HOLD ‘EM” on social media. In the clip, the superstar drives an old-fashioned yellow taxi with a Texas license plate reading “HOLD EM.” Opting not to write a caption, the post left the Beyhive buzzing at the possibility that a visual component might accompany act ii in some form or another. Though given that fans are still eagerly waiting for any sign of OG Renaissance visuals, don’t hold us (or Queen Bey) to this hypothesis.

On a completely unrelated and entirely speculative note, the last time Beyoncé was spotted driving a bright yellow vehicle through the desert, it was the same one Uma Thurman drove in "Kill Bill" for the iconic “Telephone” music video with Lady Gaga. Take that tidbit from the P—y Wagon for what you will, Honey Bee…

The Clues Were in Plain Sight at the GRAMMYs

Beyoncé at the 2024 GRAMMYs in a western-inspired custom Louis Vuitton look. (Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy)

Turns out Beyoncé’s been dropping hints for a while! At the 2024 GRAMMYs, the superstar wore a western-inspired outfit — a variation of the closing look from the fall 2024 Louis Vuitton menswear collection —  to support her husband Jay-Z, who was awarded with this year’s Dr. Dre Global Impact Award. During his off-the-cuff speech, the Roc Nation mogul recognized his wife’s success as the most-awarded artist in GRAMMY history while having yet to win Album of the Year as Bey looked on from underneath her spotless white cowboy hat. We should’ve known!

Usher Electrifies Las Vegas with Triumphant Super Bowl LVIII Halftime Show: 6 Best Moments

How The 2024 GRAMMYs Saw The Return Of Music Heroes & Birthed New Icons
Victoria Monét backstage at the 2024 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

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How The 2024 GRAMMYs Saw The Return Of Music Heroes & Birthed New Icons

Between an emotional first-time performance from Joni Mitchell and a slew of major first-time winners like Karol G and Victoria Monét, the 2024 GRAMMYs were unforgettably special. Revisit all of the ways both legends and rising stars were honored.

GRAMMYs/Feb 9, 2024 - 09:02 pm

After Dua Lipa kicked off the 2024 GRAMMYs with an awe-inspiring medley of her two new songs, country star Luke Combs followed with a performance that spawned one of the most memorable moments of the night — and one that exemplified the magic of the 66th GRAMMY Awards.

Combs was joined by Tracy Chapman, whose return to the stage marked her first public performance in 15 years. The two teamed up for her GRAMMY-winning hit "Fast Car," which earned another GRAMMY nomination this year thanks to Combs' true-to-form cover that was up for Best Country Solo Performance. The audience went wild upon seeing a resplendent, smiling Chapman strum her guitar, and it was evident that Combs felt the same excitement singing along beside her.

Chapman and Combs' duet was a powerful display of what the 2024 GRAMMYs offered: veteran musicians being honored and new stars being born.

Another celebrated musician who made a triumphant return was Joni Mitchell. Though the folk icon had won 10 GRAMMYs to date — including one for Best Folk Album at this year's Premiere Ceremony — she had never performed on the GRAMMYs stage until the 2024 GRAMMYs. Backed by a band that included Brandi Carlile, Allison Russell, Blake Mills, Jacob Collier, and other accomplished musicians, the 80-year-old singer/songwriter delivered a stirring (and tear-inducing) rendition of her classic song "Both Sides Now," singing from an ornate chair that added an element of regality.

Later in the show, Billy Joel, the legendary rock star who began his GRAMMY career in 1979 when "Just the Way You Are" won Record and Song Of The Year, used the evening to publicly debut his first single in 17 years, "Turn the Lights Back On." (He also closed out the show with his 1980 classic, "You May Be Right.") It was the latest event in Joel's long history at the show; past performances range from a 1994 rendition of "River of Dreams" to a 2022 duet of "New York State of Mind" with Tony Bennett. The crooner, who died in 2023, was featured in the telecast's In Memoriam section, where Stevie Wonder dueted with archival footage of Bennett. And Annie Lennox, currently in semi-retirement, paid tribute to Sinéad O'Connor, singing "Nothing Compares 2 You" and calling for peace.

Career-peak stars also furthered their own legends, none more so than Taylor Swift. The pop star made history at the 2024 GRAMMYs, claiming the record for most Album Of The Year wins by a single artist. The historic moment also marked another icon's return, as Celine Dion made an ovation-prompting surprise appearance to present the award. (Earlier in the night, Swift also won Best Pop Vocal Album for Midnights, announcing a new album in her acceptance speech. To date, Swift has 14 GRAMMYs and 52 nominations.)

24-time GRAMMY winner Jay-Z expanded his dominance by taking home the Dr. Dre Global Impact Award, which he accepted alongside daughter Blue Ivy. And just before Miley Cyrus took the stage to perform "Flowers," the smash single helped the pop star earn her first-ever GRAMMY, which also later nabbed Record Of The Year.

Alongside the longtime and current legends, brand-new talents emerged as well. Victoria Monét took home two GRAMMYs before triumphing in the Best New Artist category, delivering a tearful speech in which she looked back on 15 years working her way up through the industry. Last year's Best New Artist winner, Samara Joy, continued to show her promise in the jazz world, as she won Best Jazz Performance for "Tight"; she's now 3 for 3, after also taking home Best Jazz Vocal Album for Linger Awhile last year.

First-time nominee Tyla became a first-time winner — and surprised everyone, including herself — when the South African starlet won the first-ever Best African Music Performance GRAMMY for her hit "Water." boygenius, Karol G and Lainey Wilson were among the many other first-time GRAMMY winners that capped off major years with a golden gramophone (or three, in boygenius' case).

All throughout GRAMMY Week 2024, rising and emerging artists were even more of a theme in the lead-up to the show. GRAMMY House 2024 hosted performances from future stars, including Teezo Touchdown and Tiana Major9 at the Beats and Blooms Emerging Artist Showcase and Blaqbonez and Romy at the #GRAMMYsNextGen Party.

Gatherings such as A Celebration of Women in the Mix, Academy Proud: Celebrating LGBTQIA+ Voices, and the Growing Wild Independent Music Community Panel showcased traditionally marginalized voices and communities, while Halle Bailey delivered a GRAMMY U Masterclass for aspiring artists. And Clive Davis hosted his Pre-2024 GRAMMYs Gala, where stars new and old mingled ahead of the main event. 

From established, veteran artists to aspiring up-and-comers, the 2024 GRAMMYs were a night of gold and glory that honored the breadth of talent and creativity throughout the music industry, perfectly exemplifying the Recording Academy's goal to "honor music's past while investing in its future." If this year's proceedings were any indication, the future of the music industry is bright indeed. 

10 Must-See Moments From The 2024 GRAMMYs: Taylor Swift Makes History, Billy Joel & Tracy Chapman Return, Boygenius Manifest Childhood Dreams