meta-scriptGRAMMY Rewind: Bad Bunny Reps Reggaeton As He Wins His First-Ever Latin GRAMMY For Best Urban Music Album In 2019 | GRAMMY.com
GRAMMY Rewind: Bad Bunny Reps Reggaeton As He Wins His First-Ever Latin GRAMMY For Best Urban Music Album In 2019
Bad Bunny

video

GRAMMY Rewind: Bad Bunny Reps Reggaeton As He Wins His First-Ever Latin GRAMMY For Best Urban Music Album In 2019

As he claimed his trophy for Best Urban Music Album for his project 'X 100pre,' Bad Bunny championed the reggaeton style and its vaunted place in Latin music.

GRAMMYs/Sep 23, 2022 - 03:26 pm

Rapper and singer Bad Bunny didn't even prepare an acceptance speech before walking in to the Latin GRAMMY Awards in Las Vegas in 2019. Even though he was nominated for a GRAMMY for Best Urban Music Album for his studio debut, X 100pre, he was confident he wasn't going to win the golden gramophone.

So when his name was called as the winner in said category, it came as a huge surprise, and the artist delivered a heartfelt, off-the-cuff speech celebrating his supporters and repping the reggaeton style from the GRAMMYs stage.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, turn back the clock to 2019 at Vegas' MGM Grand Garden Arena, where the 20th Latin GRAMMY Awards were held, to revisit Bad Bunny's victory. The singer born Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio took time to hug every member of his crew before walking up to the stage, drink still in hand — and admitted he was feeling pretty flustered as he stepped up to the microphone.

"I've never been more nervous in my life," the singer told the crowd, before launching into a litany of thank-yous.

"Grateful to God, before anything. My family, who's always there for me. They're the ones responsible for the young man I am today," Bunny began. "And despite how high people will take me, because people are the ones who lift me up, I remain with my feet on the ground."

He also thanked his team, who rose to their feet in the audience to watch his acceptance speech, as well as his producer and all the musicians who played on his album.

But as he reached the conclusion of his speech, Bunny had one more important thing to add: He stressed that reggaeton, the style endemic to his native Puerto Rico that has become such a large part of his global career, is an intrinsic and essential piece of the Latin music genre.

"Reggaeton is part of Latin culture. And it's representing, just like lots of other music genres," Bunny said, to roaring applause from the crowd. "I tell my colleagues from reggaeton, 'Let's make an effort, let's bring back creativity and sincerity. The genre has become about views, numbers. Let's turn things around and do genuine things and different things for the people."

With that, Bunny shared his love and left the stage. While his 2019 win for Best Urban Music Album was his first Latin GRAMMY, it certainly would not be his last.

In the years since, he's picked up three more trophies at the ceremony, including another award in the Best Urban Music Album category for his El Último Tour Del Mundo. At the upcoming 2022 Latin GRAMMY Awards, he is nominated in a whopping seven categories, including for Album of the Year.

Press play on the video above to revisit Bad Bunny's first-ever Latin GRAMMY win, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more episodes of GRAMMY Rewind.

GRAMMY Rewind: H.E.R. Brings Her Whole Team Onstage While Accepting The GRAMMY Award For Best R&B Album In 2019

GRAMMY Rewind: Watch Baby Keem Celebrate "Family Ties" During Best Rap Performance Win In 2022
Baby Keem (left) at the 2022 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

video

GRAMMY Rewind: Watch Baby Keem Celebrate "Family Ties" During Best Rap Performance Win In 2022

Revisit the moment budding rapper Baby Keem won his first-ever gramophone for Best Rap Performance at the 2022 GRAMMY Awards for his Kendrick Lamar collab "Family Ties."

GRAMMYs/Feb 23, 2024 - 05:50 pm

For Baby Keem and Kendrick Lamar, The Melodic Blue was a family affair. The two cousins collaborated on three tracks from Keem's 2021 debut LP, "Range Brothers," "Vent," and "Family Ties." And in 2022, the latter helped the pair celebrate a GRAMMY victory.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, turn the clock back to the night Baby Keem accepted Best Rap Performance for "Family Ties," marking the first GRAMMY win of his career.

"Wow, nothing could prepare me for this moment," Baby Keem said at the start of his speech.

He began listing praise for his "supporting system," including his family and "the women that raised me and shaped me to become the man I am."

Before heading off the stage, he acknowledged his team, who "helped shape everything we have going on behind the scenes," including Lamar. "Thank you everybody. This is a dream."

Baby Keem received four nominations in total at the 2022 GRAMMYs. He was also up for Best New Artist, Best Rap Song, and Album Of The Year as a featured artist on Kanye West's Donda.

Press play on the video above to watch Baby Keem's complete acceptance speech for Best Rap Performance at the 2022 GRAMMYs, and check back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind.

How The 2024 GRAMMYs Saw The Return Of Music Heroes & Birthed New Icons

GRAMMY Rewind: Watch Beyoncé's Heartfelt Speech For Her Record-Breaking Win In 2023
Beyoncé at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

video

GRAMMY Rewind: Watch Beyoncé's Heartfelt Speech For Her Record-Breaking Win In 2023

Relive the night Beyoncé received a gramophone for Best Dance/Electronic Album for 'RENAISSANCE' at the 2023 GRAMMYS — the award that made her the most decorated musician in GRAMMY history.

GRAMMYs/Feb 2, 2024 - 05:12 pm

Six years after her last solo studio album, Beyoncé returned to the music industry with a bang thanks to RENAISSANCE. In homage to her late Uncle Johnny, she created a work of art inspired by the sounds of disco and house that wasn't just culturally impactful — it was history-making.

At the 2023 GRAMMYs, RENAISSANCE won Best Dance/Electronic Album. Marking Beyoncé's 32nd golden gramophone, the win gave the superstar the record for most gramophones won by an individual act.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, revisit the historic moment Queen Bey took the stage to accept her record-breaking GRAMMY at the 65th Annual GRAMMY Awards.

"Thank you so much. I'm trying not to be too emotional," Beyoncé said at the start of her acceptance speech. "I'm just trying to receive this night."

With a deep breath, she began to list her praises that included God, her family, and the Recording Academy for their continued support throughout her career. 

"I'd like to thank my Uncle Johnny, who is not here, but he's here in spirit," Beyoncé proclaimed. "I'd like to thank the queer community for your love and inventing this genre."

Watch the video above for Beyoncé's full speech for Best Dance/Electronic Album at the 2023 GRAMMYs. Check back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind. 

Tune into the 2024 GRAMMYs on Sunday, Feb. 4, airing live on the CBS Television Network (8-11:30 p.m. LIVE ET/5-8:30 p.m. LIVE PT) and streaming on Paramount+ (live and on-demand for Paramount+ with SHOWTIME subscribers, or on-demand for Paramount+ Essential subscribers the day after the special airs).

A Timeline Of Beyoncé's GRAMMY Moments, From Her First Win With Destiny's Child to Making History With 'Renaissance'

Mañana Y Siempre: How Karol G Has Made The World Mas Bonito
Karol G

Photo: Patricia J. Garcinuno / WireImage / Getty Images

feature

Mañana Y Siempre: How Karol G Has Made The World Mas Bonito

'Mañana Será Bonito' may have been the vehicle for Karol G's massive year, but the 2024 GRAMMY nominee for Best Música Urbana Album has been making strides in reggaeton, urbano and the music industry at large for a long time.

GRAMMYs/Feb 1, 2024 - 04:16 pm

For Karol G, 2023 was a watershed year. Her fourth album, Mañana Será Bonito, peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 200 and took home the golden gramophone for Album Of The Year at the Latin GRAMMYs. Her many milestones also included a Rolling Stone cover, and signing with Interscope. At the 2024 GRAMMYs, Mañana Será Bonito is nominated for Best Música Urbana Album. 

The Colombian singer and songwriter was suddenly everywhere in 2023, but this moment is the culmination of a long, steady rise. Karol G has been on the scene for some time, and changing it for the better just by being who she is: an extremely talented woman making waves in a genre still dominated by men.  

Karol G has been a pivotal figure in the world of urbano since 2017, when she collaborated with Bad Bunny on the Latin trap single "Ahora Me Llama." It was a transformative moment for both artists, whose careers took off precipitously after its release. The track led Ms. G’s aptly titled debut album, Unstoppable, which went multi-platinum and peaked at No. 2 on both the U.S. Top Latin Albums and U.S. Latin Rhythm Albums charts. At the 2018 Latin GRAMMYs, Karol was awarded Best New Artist

2024 GRAMMYs: Explore More & Meet The Nominees

Although she came out of the gate in an unstoppable fashion, Karol G's chart-topping debut was the result of years of touring and recording. The artist born Carolina Giraldo Navarro was no overnight success.

She started singing as a teenager growing up in Medellín and, after signing to Colombia's Flamingo Records, chose the name Karol G and began releasing music. Early on, she flew to Miami for a meeting with Universal Records, but they chose not to sign her on the basis that a woman would not be successful making reggaeton — a severe miscalculation, that belies female pioneers and a blossoming roster of contemporary acts

Thankfully, she ignored them. A year after "Ahora Me Llama" and Unstoppable, Karol G won her first Latin GRAMMY. 

The star’s determination makes her a role model, but Karol G's career has also been defined by an inspiring integrity around her principles and artistic vision. By now, it is a well-known anecdote that she turned down the song "Sin Pijama" because it references marijuana use. Karol does not smoke, so the lyrics would not have been authentic to her as a person, or as an artist. 

This authenticity has doubtless been key to Karol G's success. Rather than try to fit an established mold, she brings a uniquely sunny swagger and sporty style to reggaeton. She projects a powerful and feminine energy, and her music often expresses a healthy sense of sexual independence and self-empowerment. This is an intentional part of her message, especially to her female fans.

"They teach us it’s wrong to celebrate ourselves for something we have," she told Rolling Stone of her musical messaging. "And it’s not. We have to be the first ones to give ourselves credit."

Like early collaborator Bad Bunny, Karol G is able to reach a global audience without having to change the language she sings in, her genre of choice, or her messages. Case in point: One of her 2023 accomplishments was becoming the first Latina to headline a global stadium tour, and the highest-grossing Latin touring artist of the year.

She also became the first Latina to headline Lollapalooza and, in between record-breaking tour dates, saw her song "WATATI" featured on Barbie The Album. (The soundtrack is nominated for Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media at the 66th GRAMMY Awards.)

In November, she closed out her big year with a sweep of the Latin GRAMMYs: Mañana Será Bonito received the award for Best Música Urbana Album and Album Of The Year; her Shakira collab "TQG" took home the golden gramophone for Best Urban Fusion/Performance. When she accepted her award for Best Música Urbana Album, Karol exclaimed, "How cool is it for a woman to win this?" 

Karol G’s wins made up a large part of an awards ceremony where women won big:  Shakira won Song Of The Year for her collaboration with Bizzarap, while Natalia Lafourcade won Record Of The Year and Joaquina took home Best New Artist. This was the first year that women won in all the general categories — something that suggests progress for the Latin music industry. The last time a woman won the Latin GRAMMY for Best Música Urbana Album was in 2013, when Spanish rapper Mala Rodríguez took home the award for Bruja. 

Watching the Latin GRAMMYs this year, it was easy to forget that women still have a long way to go to achieve parity with their male counterparts in the music industry. If you lost sight of that, the year-end Latin charts would bring you back to reality: Of the top 50 tracks on the Hot Latin Songs chart, 11 primarily featured women, but six of those tracks belonged to Karol G. Karol’s presence matters and she knows it. 

Karol G brings a powerful feminine energy to reggaeton and Latin trap, but also an unapologetic feminism. While this is explicit in her music, it's also clear in the creative partnerships she makes. She’s had many high profile collaborations with male artists, but just as many with a diverse roster of female artists from reggaeton OG Ivy Queen ("Leyendas") to Latin fusion pop singer Kali Uchis ("Me Tengo Que Ir," "Labios Mordidos"). In an arena so dominated by male artists, each collaboration with another woman is meaningful, but her collaborations with rising artists, such as Young Miko — who appears on the song "Dispo" from Karol’s Bichota Season — truly make a difference. 

Artists like Karol G increase the range of possibilities for artists in their wake, and for anyone in the music industry who flouts narrow expectations. Karol G knows that her victories have larger implications, and this eye toward the future has helped her reach unprecedented heights. "I understand how hard it is [for women to break through] because of how hard it was for me,"she recently told Billboard.

It wasn't easy for Karol G to get where she is today, but she has been opening doors for others — women, artists in reggaeton, artists in urbano and others —  every step of the way. From here on, the title of her album is ringing more and more prescient, and that’s mas bonito.  

2024 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Full Nominees List

GRAMMY Rewind: Dr. Dre Takes Home The Inaugural Global Impact Award, Named In His Honor, In 2023
Dr. Dre at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Timothy Norris / FilmMagic / Getty Images

video

GRAMMY Rewind: Dr. Dre Takes Home The Inaugural Global Impact Award, Named In His Honor, In 2023

In homage to Dr. Dre's trailblazing achievements in music, the Recording Academy presented the first-ever Dr. Dre Global Impact Award at the 2023 GRAMMY Awards ceremony — to the rapper himself.

GRAMMYs/Jan 26, 2024 - 04:07 am

Dr. Dre has proven that an artist's job can go far beyond writing lyrics and performing at venues. In his nearly 40-year career, he has founded his own record label, Aftermath Entertainment, co-founded Beats Electronics, endowed the USC Jimmy Iovine and Andrew Young Academy, and much more.

To celebrate his massive achievements, the Recording Academy and Black Music Collective created the Global Impact Award, named in his honor. Relive the moment Dr. Dre accepted the inaugural gramophone in this episode of GRAMMY Rewind.

"I know everybody in here probably knows this already, but this is the 50th anniversary of hip-hop," Dr. Dre said at the beginning of his speech. "Make some noise for hip-hop!"

In his eyes, one of the most rewarding parts of his work is the collaboration. "Assembling a team with talented artists, engineers, and musicians with gifts different from mine and who shine in ways that I don't have been both inspiring and crucial to my success," he recalled. 

"I'm extremely grateful to all of those who have comprised that team over the years, and I would not be here accepting this award without their contribution."

Before heading off the stage, Dr. Dre gave one encouraging message to the next wave of music's changemakers: "What I love about this award is that it uses my name to inspire the next generation of producers, artists, and entrepreneurs to reach for their greatness and demand that from everybody around you. Never compromise your vision. Pursue quality over quantity. And remember everything is important."

Watch the video above for Dr. Dre's complete acceptance speech for the Dr. Dre Global Impact Award at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Check back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind, and be sure to tune into the 2024 GRAMMYs on Sunday, Feb. 4, airing live on the CBS Television Network (8-11:30 p.m. LIVE ET/5-8:30 p.m. LIVE PT) and streaming on Paramount+ (live and on-demand for Paramount+ with SHOWTIME subscribers, or on-demand for Paramount+ Essential subscribers the day after the special airs).

Essential Hip-Hop Releases From The 1990s: Snoop Dogg, Digable Planets, Jay-Z & More