meta-scriptAnderson .Paak Wins Best R&B Album For 'Ventura' | 2020 GRAMMYs | GRAMMY.com
Anderson .Paak Wins Best R&B Album For 'Ventura' | 2020 GRAMMYs

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Anderson .Paak Wins Best R&B Album For 'Ventura' | 2020 GRAMMYs

Anderson .Paak takes home Best R&B Album at the 62nd GRAMMY Awards

GRAMMYs/Jan 27, 2020 - 04:58 am

Anderson .Paak has won Best R&B Album for Ventura at the 62nd GRAMMY Awards

Anderson .Paak beat out fellow category nominees BJ The Chicago Kid (1123), Lucky Daye (Painted), Ella Mai (Ella Mai) and PJ Morton (Paul).

Check out the complete 62nd GRAMMY Awards nominees and winners list here.

4 Reasons To Watch The 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony
The 2024 GRAMMYs will air live on Sunday, Feb. 4, on CBS and Paramount+.

Graphic courtesy of the Recording Academy

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4 Reasons To Watch The 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony

The Premiere Ceremony may not be part of the CBS telecast, but it’s an indispensable part of the 2024 GRAMMYs experience — and the Recording Academy’s purview. Here are four reasons you don’t want to miss it, ahead of the 66th GRAMMY Awards on Feb. 4.

GRAMMYs/Jan 31, 2024 - 03:19 pm

As momentous as the 2024 GRAMMYs telecast will be, it will only cover a fraction of the actual GRAMMY nominations.

The realities of TV broadcasting mean the wider world only gets to see, not the whole iceberg, but merely the tip. This by way of its head-turning, world-shifting General Field Categories including Album Of The Year, Record Of The Year, and Best New Artist.

Yes, the General Field Categories boast the most visibility. But while they may be listed at the top of the nominations list, they are never meant to overshadow those beneath — not by a long shot.

That’s why the Recording Academy puts so much time, intention and care into the Premiere Ceremony, which annually precedes the main GRAMMYs telecast. And by all accounts, the 2024 iteration will be one for the ages.

The 66th Annual GRAMMY Awards Ceremony & Livestream will air at 12:30 p.m. PT/3:30 p.m. ET on live.GRAMMY.com and the Recording Academy's YouTube channel. City National Bank, the Official Bank of the GRAMMY Awards, is returning for its second year as the presenting sponsor of the Premiere Ceremony.

The Premiere Ceremony is the most incredible lead-up to Music's Biggest Night," Recording Academy CEO Harvey Mason jr. said in a statement. "With an amazing line-up of presenters and performers, we'll reveal and celebrate the winners of more than 80 Categories, spanning the diverse genres and crafts that have contributed to such a spectacular year in music."

Read on for a list of four reasons to be thrilled for the Premiere Ceremony — and we’ll see you on the stream!

A Star-Studded Opening Number

The opening performance at the Premiere Ceremony is always a highlight, and this year promises to be no exception: J. Ivy, Larkin Poe, Pentatonix, Sheila E., and Jordin Sparks.

At the 2024 GRAMMYs, J. Ivy is nominated for Best Spoken Word Poetry Album, for The Light Inside. Poe is up for Best Contemporary Blues Album, for Blood Harmony. For Holidays Around the World, Pentatonix earned a nomination for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album.

Finally, for her feature on for KING & COUNTRY’s “Love Me Like I Am,” Sparks is up for Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song. (E., though being a four-time GRAMMY nominee, is not nominated at the 2024 GRAMMYs.)

Stellar Performers All Around

The rest of the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony will feature brilliant performers. These musicians will showcase the wide range of genres the Academy celebrates on GRAMMY night, as well as the diverse creators in the Academy and the music industry at large.

These include current nominees Adam Blackstone, Brandy Clark, Kirk Franklin, Robert Glasper, Bob James, Laufey, Terrace Martin, and Gaby Moreno and David Aguilar, as well as GRAMMY-nominated recording artist/drummer Harvey Mason Sr.

The Music’s In Great Hands

The music producer and music director of the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony will be Cheche Alara, a GRAMMY-and Latin GRAMMY-winning music master who has worked on titanic albums by Lady Gaga, Christina Aguilera, Natalia Lafourcade, and many more.

With Alara at the helm, the Premiere Ceremony won’t just celebrate music — it’ll be a bastion of outstanding music itself.

You Get The Complete GRAMMYs Experience

Don’t think of the Premiere Ceremony as the mere ramp-up to the 2024 GRAMMYs; think of them as two pieces of one GRAMMYs experience.

By carefully watching the Premiere Ceremony as well as the main telecast, you get the entire sense of where music is headed, through the lens of the world’s leading society of music people.

So tune into both the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony and the 2024 GRAMMYs themselves — if you love this universal artform, and wish to elevate it, join us on Feb. 4 for Music’s Biggest Night!

How To Watch The 2024 GRAMMYs Live: GRAMMY Nominations, Performers, Air Date, Red Carpet, Streaming Channel & More

Performers For 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony Announced: Robert Glasper, Terrace Martin, Gaby Moreno, Kirk Franklin, Adam Blackstone, Brandy Clark & More; Justin Tranter To Host
The 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony will stream live from Peacock Theater in Los Angeles on Sunday, Feb. 4, at 12:30 p.m. PT/3:30 p.m. ET on the Recording Academy's YouTube channel and on live.GRAMMY.com

Graphic courtesy of the Recording Academy

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Performers For 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony Announced: Robert Glasper, Terrace Martin, Gaby Moreno, Kirk Franklin, Adam Blackstone, Brandy Clark & More; Justin Tranter To Host

Streaming live Feb. 4, the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony will include an opening number featuring J. Ivy, Larkin Poe, Pentatonix, Sheila E., and Jordin Sparks. Presenters include Natalia Lafourcade, Carly Pearce, Molly Tuttle, Rufus Wainwright, and more.

GRAMMYs/Jan 25, 2024 - 01:59 pm

GRAMMY night just got bigger! The Recording Academy has announced performers and presenters, as well as the host, for the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony. The Premiere Ceremony kicks off with an opening number featuring a performance by J. Ivy, Larkin Poe, Pentatonix, Sheila E., and Jordin Sparks. Other artists scheduled to perform include current nominees Adam Blackstone, Brandy Clark, Kirk Franklin, Robert Glasper, Bob James, Laufey, Terrace Martin, and Gaby Moreno and El David Aguilar, as well as GRAMMY-nominated recording artist/drummer Harvey Mason Sr. Acclaimed songwriter/producer and activist Justin Tranter, who is currently nominated for Songwriter of the Year, Non-Classical, will host the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony.

Presenters at the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony include Patti Austin, Natalia Lafourcade, Carly Pearce, Molly Tuttle, Rufus Wainwright, and five-time GRAMMY winner and former Recording Academy Board of Trustees Chair Jimmy Jam. Recording Academy CEO Harvey Mason jr. and Chair of the Board of Trustees Tammy Hurt will provide opening remarks.

Taking place at Peacock Theater in Los Angeles hours before the 2024 GRAMMYs, the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony, officially known as the 66th GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony, is a special presentation in which the majority of the night’s GRAMMY Awards are awarded. The 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony will stream live on Sunday, Feb. 4, at 12:30 p.m. PT/3:30 p.m. ET on the Recording Academy's YouTube channel and on live.GRAMMY.com. City National Bank, the Official Bank of the GRAMMY Awards, is returning for its second year as the presenting sponsor of the Premiere Ceremony.

2024 GRAMMYs: Explore More & Meet The Nominees

"The Premiere Ceremony is the most incredible lead-up to Music's Biggest Night," Recording Academy CEO Harvey Mason jr. said. "With an amazing line-up of presenters and performers, we'll reveal and celebrate the winners of more than 80 Categories, spanning the diverse genres and crafts that have contributed to such a spectacular year in music."

Learn more about the 2024 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony performers, presenters and host, who are all mostly current nominees at the 2024 GRAMMYs, below.

Austin is nominated for Best Jazz Vocal Album (For Ella 2 Featuring Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band); Blackstone is nominated for Best Jazz Performance ("Vulnerable (Live)" Featuring The Baylor Project & Russell Ferranté) and Best Jazz Instrumental Album (Legacy: The Instrumental Jawn).

Meanwhile, Clark is nominated for Best Musical Theater Album (Shucked), Best Country Solo Performance ("Buried"), Best Country Song ("Buried"), Best Americana Performance ("Dear Insecurity" Featuring Brandi Carlile), Best American Roots Song ("Dear Insecurity" Featuring Brandi Carlile), and Best Americana Album (Brandy Clark).

Franklin is nominated for Best Gospel Performance/Song ("All Things"); Glasper is nominated for Best R&B Performance ("Back To Love" Featuring SiR & Alex Isley) and Best R&B Song ("Back To Love" Featuring SiR & Alex Isley).

James is nominated for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album (Jazz Hands); J. Ivy is nominated for Best Spoken Word Poetry Album (The Light Inside); Lafourcade is nominated for Best Latin Rock Or Alternative Album (De Todas Las Flores).

Larkin Poe is nominated for Best Contemporary Blues Album (Blood Harmony); Laufey is nominated for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album (Bewitched); Martin is nominated for Best Progressive R&B Album (Nova with James Fauntleroy).

Moreno is nominated for Best Latin Pop Album (X Mí (Vol.1)); Pearce is nominated for Best Country Duo/Group Performance ("We Don't Fight Anymore" Featuring Chris Stapleton); Pentatonix is nominated for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album (Holidays Around The World).

Sparks is nominated for Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song ("Love Me Like I Am" with for KING & COUNTRY); Tranter is nominated for Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical; Tuttle is nominated for Best Bluegrass Album (City Of Gold with Golden Highway); Wainwright is nominated for Best Folk Album (Folkocracy).

The 2024 GRAMMYs will broadcast live following the Premiere Ceremony on CBS Television Network and stream live and on-demand on Paramount+ at 8-11:30 p.m. ET/5-8:30 p.m. PT. See here for the full list of nominees at the 2024 GRAMMYs. Learn more about how to watch the 2024 GRAMMYs. See the full list of performers and host at the 2024 GRAMMYs to date.

The 66th GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony is produced by Branden Chapman, Ruby Marchand, Chantel Sausedo, and Rex Supa on behalf of the Recording Academy. Greg V. Fera is executive producer and Cheche Alara is music producer and music director.

2024 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Full Nominees List

Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: Coco Jones On Her Breakthrough Year, Turning Rejection Into Purpose & Learning From Babyface
Coco Jones

Photo: Courtesy Coco Jones

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Meet The First-Time GRAMMY Nominee: Coco Jones On Her Breakthrough Year, Turning Rejection Into Purpose & Learning From Babyface

Coco Jones is nominated across five categories at the 2024 GRAMMYs, including Best New Artist and Best R&B Album for her EP, 'What I Didn't Tell You.' The first-time nominee discussed her hit, "ICU," working with legends and the power of representation.

GRAMMYs/Jan 8, 2024 - 02:23 pm

Coco Jones is feeling more inspired than ever following a year of exciting surprises and breakthroughs. In 2023, the 25-year-old budding star celebrated her first Billboard Hot 100 entry thanks to her platinum-selling "ICU" single, embarked on her first headlining tour, and earned her first GRAMMY nominations.

"Being a GRAMMY-nominated artist changes everything. It's such a different creative mindset when the world says, 'You're good, we like what you do,'" Jones tells GRAMMY.com. "It's like a gold star. It makes you want to work harder, it makes you wanna continue to impress, and it makes you impressed with yourself, too."

Jones is nominated across five categories at the 2024 GRAMMYs: Her 2022 EP What I Didn't Tell You is up for Best R&B Album and its "ICU" will compete for Best R&B Performance and Best R&B Song. Her feature on Babyface's "Simple" has received a nod for Best Traditional R&B Performance. Jones is also up for the coveted golden gramophone for Best New Artist.

In recent years, her vocal prowess has received praise from SZA, Janet Jackson, and Beyoncé, but anyone who's even remotely familiar with Jones' story knows that her newfound success is anything but overnight. Jones first found success at age 14, when she starred in the 2012 Disney movie musical Let It Shine. The Tennessee native faced colorism early on, which she addressed in a 2020 YouTube video that went viral.

"I always wanted that representation that my dreams were possible growing up," she shares. "I definitely was not based in reality of what the entertainment industry is. It's tough and it's challenging and sometimes it isn't fair and that is not what I was prepared for as a kid."

During the pandemic, Jones secured a spot in "Bel-Air" (Peacock's reimagining of "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air") as the spoiled yet beloved Hilary Banks, but she never let go of her love of  music. Following her 2014 departure from Hollywood Records, Jones released music independently, including the ominous "Hollyweird" and "Depressed"; when Def Jam approached her in the summer of 2021, she was ready for her close-up.

Fast forward to present, and Jones is gearing up for one of the most pivotal nights of her blossoming career. But perhaps the most precious thing she's collected along the way is self-assurance. "I'm learning that I have to believe in my creative choices and that I shouldn't second guess what I feel because it does well," she says with a laugh.

Of her recent success, Jones says the back-to-back accolades shocked her, but like a true artist, she's already thinking ahead and manifesting an exciting first for 2024: "I want my debut album to hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart."

Ahead of the 2024 GRAMMYs, Jones discusses the power of representation for dark-skinned Black women, why her mother is her biggest inspiration, and how joining forces with Babyface created momentum in her career.

This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity.

After finding out that you received five GRAMMY nominations, you posted an Instagram video showing you and your mother reveling in the excitement of it all. Tell me more about that moment and your mother's role in this journey.

I'm one of four children and my mom owned multiple businesses, but she made us all feel loved and supported while also being a boss. Watching her navigate the entertainment industry — which she had no prior experience with — was very inspiring. She took every challenge head-on and still managed to make time with all of her kids. 

She's always been a visionary, so I think for her, it's like, This is exactly what we worked for. The end goal is to be award-winning, to be show-stopping, to be classic, to be timeless. That's what she saw for me even when I was a little girl on stage singing Aretha Franklin.

There were times when it was hard for me to see what she saw in me, especially when you're dealing with the rejection that is the music industry. But she always knows the right thing to say to keep me going and to keep my faith. So, when it wasn't like how it is now, she was the entire team. She did anything she could to help me progress.

You retweeted a meet-and-greet with a fan, who donned your merch from 2018, which seemed to take you by surprise. It seems like your 2023 breakthrough was a win for not just yourself, but for those early supporters as well.

I would definitely say it's a win for my fans and my supporters, but also for young Black women who look like me and have big dreams and just want to see what they are dreaming about is possible. I know that I inspire so many young Black women — they tell me almost every day that seeing me win helps them believe in themselves winning.

My goal is to continue to break those barriers down for young Black women so that it's not such a surprise when we succeed.

In a 2022 interview, you said you wanted to experience the highs of being an entertainer and being on stage "even if it meant a lot of lows." Many creatives feel that way. Do you have any advice for struggling artists who feel like no one's paying attention?

You can make it this thing where you feel like you're running out of time, or you can make it feel like you're adjusting to time. Time is whatever you decide it is.

There were so many obstacles I didn't understand, but hindsight is 20/20. I needed the lessons that I learned, I needed the self-reliance, I needed the optimism and the faith. So, I think it was all very growing but still tough not knowing what was going to happen, not knowing if I was going to have that life-changing job, that life-changing song. 

I'm just grateful to God for protecting me through all the confusion and for not giving up. I had enough support around me and enough doors to open even though they felt far and few between to keep me sustained and pursuing this dream, even though I was pursuing it without any guarantees.

What I Didn't Tell You isn't the first EP you released, but it's the one that made you a first-time GRAMMY nominee. What was different this time around?

I was very supported; when Def Jam approached me, they seemed so understanding of my vision that I couldn't help but feel like we were already a team. They helped me put the pieces together. Before this, I was just on my own or it was me and my mom, so I felt more supported with this EP release. My label understands me and what I want to be, and there's no pushback against who I am and what I can naturally do. It's all about enhancing. 

As part of R&B's new class, what do you want to bring to the genre?

More uptempo! I want to be able to sing my heart out but make a bop that you wanna dance to. I love how Whitney Houston would do that with some of her songs like "I'm Your Baby Tonight" and "How Will I Know."

Your breakthrough single, "ICU," is up for Best R&B Song, but what lesser-known song off What I Didn't Tell You (Deluxe) would you nominate in the same category if you could?

"Fallin'" because it's a sensual song, and I feel like it sits in a really cool, pretty place in my voice. It also tells a good story of the chaos that my life is while also starting to fall for somebody.

In 2022, you joined forces with R&B legend Babyface for his collaborative Girls Night Out project. Your "Simple" duet with him is nominated for Best Traditional R&B Performance. Do you think collaborating with Babyface acted as a precursor for the incredible year you had?

When I learned Babyface wanted me on his album, I was beside myself. He was really one of the first legends to give me that stamp of approval. I definitely think the recognition I got from him was like a turning point in what was next for my life. The world started to notice around that time. 

When I interviewed Babyface soon after the release of Girls Night Out, he talked about doing his homework to better understand the differences in today's R&B. That was surprising to hear, because he's clearly an expert at writing hit songs but not above learning from others. What did you learn from his mentorship?

I just learned that you can be a legend and you can still be open to ideas, open to new talents, and open to suggestions. Just stay open to what’s new, who's new, and why they're doing well, and that's what will keep you legendary. 

I'm a big fan of studying music, so I will continue to be a student. Creating music and studying music are two different things to me. I study it and then I feel creative, so I think it's about separating them because sometimes if you're creating while studying, you just end up repeating exactly what somebody's doing and that doesn't feel authentic. It's more about getting inspired and then creating.

My love for music and being a creative is what keeps me going because it's not always fun, it's not always easy. Sometimes it's about business, sometimes it's about pushing past your exhaustion. I don't think I would do that, not for this long, if I didn't love the payoff of being a creative. 

How will you celebrate if you win a GRAMMY?

I haven't thought about how I'm gonna celebrate. I think my favorite type of celebrations are intimate. They're with people who are in the mud with me — my family, my team. I would probably just want to have a great dinner and think about how far we've come and what's next.

2024 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Full Nominees List

GRAMMY Rewind: Kendrick Lamar Honors Hip-Hop's Greats While Accepting Best Rap Album GRAMMY For 'To Pimp a Butterfly' In 2016
Kendrick Lamar

Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic

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GRAMMY Rewind: Kendrick Lamar Honors Hip-Hop's Greats While Accepting Best Rap Album GRAMMY For 'To Pimp a Butterfly' In 2016

Upon winning the GRAMMY for Best Rap Album for 'To Pimp a Butterfly,' Kendrick Lamar thanked those that helped him get to the stage, and the artists that blazed the trail for him.

GRAMMYs/Oct 13, 2023 - 06:01 pm

Updated Friday Oct. 13, 2023 to include info about Kendrick Lamar's most recent GRAMMY wins, as of the 2023 GRAMMYs.

A GRAMMY veteran these days, Kendrick Lamar has won 17 GRAMMYs and has received 47 GRAMMY nominations overall. A sizable chunk of his trophies came from the 58th annual GRAMMY Awards in 2016, when he walked away with five — including his first-ever win in the Best Rap Album category.

This installment of GRAMMY Rewind turns back the clock to 2016, revisiting Lamar's acceptance speech upon winning Best Rap Album for To Pimp A Butterfly. Though Lamar was alone on stage, he made it clear that he wouldn't be at the top of his game without the help of a broad support system. 

"First off, all glory to God, that's for sure," he said, kicking off a speech that went on to thank his parents, who he described as his "those who gave me the responsibility of knowing, of accepting the good with the bad."

Looking for more GRAMMYs news? The 2024 GRAMMY nominations are here!

He also extended his love and gratitude to his fiancée, Whitney Alford, and shouted out his Top Dawg Entertainment labelmates. Lamar specifically praised Top Dawg's CEO, Anthony Tiffith, for finding and developing raw talent that might not otherwise get the chance to pursue their musical dreams.

"We'd never forget that: Taking these kids out of the projects, out of Compton, and putting them right here on this stage, to be the best that they can be," Lamar — a Compton native himself — continued, leading into an impassioned conclusion spotlighting some of the cornerstone rap albums that came before To Pimp a Butterfly.

"Hip-hop. Ice Cube. This is for hip-hop," he said. "This is for Snoop Dogg, Doggystyle. This is for Illmatic, this is for Nas. We will live forever. Believe that."

To Pimp a Butterfly singles "Alright" and "These Walls" earned Lamar three more GRAMMYs that night, the former winning Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song and the latter taking Best Rap/Sung Collaboration (the song features Bilal, Anna Wise and Thundercat). He also won Best Music Video for the remix of Taylor Swift's "Bad Blood." 

Lamar has since won Best Rap Album two more times, taking home the golden gramophone in 2018 for his blockbuster LP DAMN., and in 2023 for his bold fifth album, Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers.

Watch Lamar's full acceptance speech above, and check back at GRAMMY.com every Friday for more GRAMMY Rewind episodes. 

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