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Hispanic Heritage Month: How Latinx Music Industry Professionals Are Bringing La Cultura To The Masses

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Hispanic Heritage Month: How Latinx Music Industry Professionals Are Bringing La Cultura To The Masses

Mija mgmt's Doris Munoz, Atlantic Records' Riggs Morales, SoundCloud's Roberto Caiffa and Warner Music's Vanessa Noguera gather to talk about Latinx representation in the music industry

GRAMMYs/Oct 10, 2020 - 03:56 am

Latinx music industry executives have trailblazed various areas of the industry and continue to shape the landscape of Latin music around the world. Doris Munoz, founder of mija mgmt and Solidarity for Sanctuary, Rigo "Riggs" Morales, senior vice president, A&R at Atlantic Records, Roberto Caiffa, Head of Major Label Relations at SoundCloud, and Vanessa Noguera, co-founder of the Industry In Spanglish and ECommerce Operations Manager at Warner Music, gather to talk about their experiences, what opened the doors for them in the industry, how they are taking the Latinx culture forward through their work and what needs to happen to see more representation in the industry.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Cecilia Esquivel & Lilo Gonzalez Talk Political Uprisings & Their Influence On Latin Music

Universal language: Why humans need music

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Universal language: Why humans need music

Learn why music is truly a common language that is key to human development and evolution

GRAMMYs/Jul 3, 2017 - 11:51 pm

There's no doubt music finds a way into nearly every moment of our daily lives, whether it's marking milestones such as a first dance at a wedding, the soundtrack to our favorite movie or singing in the shower for fun. In fact, it's hard to imagine times when we are more than an ear-length away from hearing another song.

But why does music mean so much to us? A powerful form of communication that transcends all barriers — music is our common language, but why?

A composer and educator with a lifelong fascination for music, Adam Ockelford has traced our connection with music back to infants and caregivers. Infants are unable to follow words, but they are developmentally primed to trace patterns in sound, such as through the songs a caretaker sings to them. Therefore, understanding music is intuitive for humans, even at a very young age, and it encourages healthy development.

In addition, there may be another evolutionary purpose for music. Music provides a sense of sameness between humans — if you can copy the sounds someone else makes, you must be an ally. This synergy plays a role in human survival because it evokes empathy and understanding, a lesson we still learn from music in today's culture.

"Music is central to the notion of what it is to be human, and spans cultures, continents and centuries," writes Ockelford. "My music, your music, our music can bind us together as families, as tribes and as societies in a way that nothing else can."

Need a playlist? Check out our favorite songs of summer 2017 

Luis Fonsi To Maluma: Who Will Win Record Of The Year Latin GRAMMY?

Maluma

Photo: C Flanigan/Getty Images

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Luis Fonsi To Maluma: Who Will Win Record Of The Year Latin GRAMMY?

Cast your vote. Who will voters choose for Record Of The Year at the 18th Latin GRAMMY Awards?

GRAMMYs/Oct 1, 2017 - 08:57 pm

Including the likes of Shakira and Carlos Vives to Natalia Lafourcade, Marc Anthony, Jesse & Joy, and Alejandro Sanz, the previous Latin GRAMMY winners for Record Of The Year reads like a who's who of Latin music. This year's nominees are no different.

With Rubén Blades' sensual "La Flor De La Canela," Luis Fonsi featuring Daddy Yankee's song of the summer "Despacito," Residente's impactful "Guerra," Ricky Martin with Maluma's Vente Pa' Ca," and Jorge Drexler's "El Surco," among others, this year's class of 18th Latin GRAMMY Awards nominees for Record Of The Year is loaded.  

Which song do you think will take home the Latin GRAMMY for Record Of The Year? Cast your vote below.

WATCH: Lady Gaga And Ariana Grande Team Up For "Rain On Me"

Lady Gaga 

Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Haus Laboratories

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WATCH: Lady Gaga And Ariana Grande Team Up For "Rain On Me"

Grande enters the "Stupid Love" singer's futuristic world as the two pop sensations dance together in an out-of-this-planet setting

GRAMMYs/May 22, 2020 - 10:17 pm

Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande have come together for "Rain On Me," an optimistic pop track about Gaga's personal experiences off her forthcoming album, Chromatica

"I can feel it on my skin (It's comin' down on me)/ Teardrops on my face (Water like misery)/ Let it wash away my sins (It's coming down on me)," the global pop stars sing together on the chorus. "I'd rather be dry, but at least I'm alive/ Rain on me, rain, rain."

The song is an empowering track about being comfortable with letting tears fall. Gaga revealed the many layers behind the song in an interview with Vulture, sharing that some of the inspiration for it came from her relationship with drinking. "This is about an analog of tears being the rain. And you know what it’s also a metaphor for, is the amount of drinking that I was doing to numb myself," she said. "I’d rather be dry. I’d rather not be drinking, but I haven’t died yet. I’m still alive. Rain on me."

She added that the song also went beyond that. "Okay, I’m going to keep on drinking. This song has many layers," she said. 

Grande enters the "Stupid Love" singer's futuristic world in the video released Friday, May 22, with the two dancing together in an out-of-this-planet setting. The video ends with them in a strong embrace.

Gaga has shared how much the collaboration with Grande means to her and thanked Grande for "reminding me I’m strong."  Before the video's release, she tweeted out a special message to the "Stuck with U" singer. 

"One time I felt like I was crying so much it would never stop. Instead of fighting it, I thought bring it on, I can do hard things. @arianagrande I love you for your strength and friendship. Let’s show them what we’ve got," she tweeted

Grande returned the love with more love, revealing what sharing a track with Gaga means to her.

"one time ..... i met a woman who knew pain the same way i did... who cried as much as i did, drank as much wine as i did, ate as much pasta as i did and who’s heart was bigger than her whole body. she immediately felt like a sister to me," she tweeted. "she then held my hand and invited me into the beautiful world of chromatica and together, we got to express how beautiful and healing it feels to mothafuckinnnn cry ! i hope this makes u all feel as uplifted as it does for us both. i love u @ladygaga , u stunning superwoman !"  

Watch the full video above. Chromatica is set to be released on May 29. 

Recording Academy Board Members Cover John Prine's "Angel From Montgomery" To Benefit MusiCares' COVID-19 Relief Fund

Remember When? Marc Anthony's "I Need To Know" Nets Latin GRAMMY

Marc Anthony

Photo: Todd Plitt/Hulton Archive

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Remember When? Marc Anthony's "I Need To Know" Nets Latin GRAMMY

Singer/songwriter takes home the first Latin GRAMMY ever awarded for Song Of The Year

GRAMMYs/Sep 24, 2017 - 08:00 pm

Thanks to the crossover popularity of Latin artists such as Ricky Martin, Enrique Iglesias and Shakira in the late '90s, salsa master Marc Anthony was soon to join the Latin hot flash with his first English crossover album, which was self-titled.

The result of Marc Anthony was not only his first Billboard Hot 100 Top 5 hit, "I Need To Know," but it also landed the singer his first-ever Latin GRAMMY Award, and the distinction of earning the very first Latin GRAMMY for Song Of The Year in 2000 for the Spanish version of the catchy tune, "Dímelo."

Anthony has gone on to win an additional four Latin GRAMMYs and two GRAMMY Awards. In 2016 he was honored as the Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year for his outstanding achievements as an artist and for his philanthropic work.