Double Play: GRAMMY- And Oscar-Winning Songs

  • Adele
    Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images
  • Eminem
    Photo: Kevin Mazur/WireImage.com
  • Bruce Springsteen
    Photo: Time Life Pictures/DMI/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images
  • Annie Lennox
    Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images
  • Barbra Streisand
    Photo: Terry O'Neill/Getty Images
  • Henry Mancini (left) and Johnny Mercer with Debbie Reynolds
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  • A.R. Rahman
    Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images
  • Ryan Bingham and T Bone Burnett
    Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic
  • Randy Newman
    Photo: Jeffrey Mayer/WireImage.com
  • Alan Menken and Tim Rice
    Photo: Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
  • Alan and Marilyn Bergman
    Photo: Rick Diamond/WireImage.com
  • Carly Simon
    Photo: Ron Galella/Ron Galella Collection/Getty Images

By Paul Grein

The Academy Award for Original Song went to "Let It Go" from "Frozen." We'll have to wait until next Feb. 8 to see if the power ballad also wins a GRAMMY in a songwriting category. Over the years, 20 songs have received both honors — an Oscar for Original Song and also a GRAMMY in a songwriting category. Here's a complete list.

The list covers more than 50 years of film music. Ballads dominate, as you might expect, but disco, rock, hip-hop, and children's music are also represented.

The chances of a song winning both awards increased in 1987, when The Recording Academy introduced a new category, Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or Television.

(Alan Menken is sure to enjoy this list. He co-wrote four of the 20 songs that have achieved this double play.)

"Moon River" from Breakfast At Tiffany's. Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer co-wrote this gorgeous ballad, which won an Oscar in 1961 and a GRAMMY for Song Of The Year that same year.

"Days Of Wine And Roses" from the movie of same name. Mancini and Mercer struck again with this melancholy ballad, which won an Oscar in 1962 and a GRAMMY for Song Of The Year the following year.

"The Shadow Of Your Smile" from The Sandpiper. Johnny Mandel and Paul Francis Webster co-wrote this sensuous ballad, which won an Oscar in 1965 and a GRAMMY for Song Of The Year that same year.

"The Way We Were" from the movie of the same name. Alan and Marilyn Bergman and Marvin Hamlisch co-wrote this instant standard, which won an Oscar in 1973 and a GRAMMY for Song Of The Year the following year. Marilyn Bergman was the first woman to win both awards for co-writing a song.

"Evergreen (Love Theme From A Star Is Born)." Barbra Streisand and Paul Williams co-wrote this lovely ballad, which won an Oscar in 1976 and tied with "You Light Up My Life" for a GRAMMY for Song Of The Year the following year.

"You Light Up My Life" from the movie of the same name. Joe Brooks wrote this earnest ballad, which won an Oscar in 1977 and tied for a GRAMMY for Song Of The Year that same year. Brooks was the first person to win both awards for a song that he wrote by himself.

"Last Dance" from Thank God It's Friday. Paul Jabara wrote this heartfelt disco classic, which won an Oscar in 1978 and a GRAMMY for Best Rhythm & Blues Song that same year.

"Let The River Run" from Working Girl. Carly Simon wrote this anthemic song, which won an Oscar in 1988 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or Television the following year. Simon was the first woman to win both awards for a song she wrote by herself.

"Under The Sea" from The Little Mermaid. Howard Ashman and Alan Menken co-wrote this delightful children's song, which won an Oscar in 1989 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television the following year. This was the first song from an animated movie to win both awards.

"Beauty And The Beast" from the movie of the same name. Ashman and Menken triumphed again with this graceful and eloquent ballad, which won an Oscar in 1991 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television the following year. Ashman's wins were posthumous: He died from AIDS in March 1991.

"A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)" from Aladdin. Menken kept his winning streak going following Ashman's untimely death. Menken and Tim Rice won an Oscar for this sprightly song in 1992 and GRAMMYs for both Song Of The Year and Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television the following year.

"Streets Of Philadelphia" from Philadelphia. Bruce Springsteen wrote this stark and somber ballad, which won an Oscar in 1993 and three GRAMMYs in songwriting categories the following year: Song Of The Year, Best Rock Song and Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television.

"Colors Of The Wind" from Pocahontas. Menken and Stephen Schwartz co-wrote this socially conscious ballad, which won an Oscar in 1995 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television that same year.

"My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme From Titanic)." James Horner and Will Jennings co-wrote this classic power ballad, which won an Oscar in 1997 and two songwriting GRAMMYs the following year: Song Of The Year and Best Song Written For A Motion Picture Or For Television.

"If I Didn't Have You" from Monsters, Inc. Randy Newman wrote this lighthearted song about friendship, which won an Oscar in 2001 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written For A Motion Picture, Television Or Other Visual Media the following year.

"Lose Yourself" from 8 Mile. Jeff Bass, Eminem and Luis Resto co-wrote this inspirational hip-hop anthem, which won an Oscar in 2002 and a GRAMMY for Best Rap Song the following year.

"Into The West" from The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King. Annie Lennox, Howard Shore and Fran Walsh co-wrote this ethereal ballad, which won an Oscar in 2003 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written For A Motion Picture, Television Or Other Visual Media the following year.

"Jai Ho" from Slumdog Millionaire. Gulzar, A.R. Rahman and Tanvi Shah co-wrote this festive song with global pop touches. The song won an Oscar in 2008 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written For Motion Picture, Television Or Other Visual Media the following year. (Note: Shah won a GRAMMY, but not an Oscar, for co-writing the song.)

"The Weary Kind (Theme From Crazy Heart)." Ryan Bingham and T Bone Burnett co-wrote this folkish ballad, which won an Oscar in 2009 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written For Motion Picture, Television Or Other Visual Media the following year.

"Skyfall" from the movie of the same name. Adele and Paul Epworth co-wrote this elegant James Bond theme, which won an Oscar in 2013 and a GRAMMY for Best Song Written For Visual Media at the 56th GRAMMY Awards on Jan. 26.

(Paul Grein co-wrote the liner notes for The Envelope Please…Academy Award Winning Songs [1934–1993]. He writes regularly for Yahoo Music.)