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GRAMMY Rewind: Watch Whitney Houston Win Best Female R&B Vocal Performance At The 2000 GRAMMYs

Whitney Houston

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GRAMMY Rewind: Watch Whitney Houston Win Best Female R&B Vocal Performance At The 2000 GRAMMYs

In our latest edition of GRAMMY Rewind, watch the late, great Whitney Houston accept the Best Female R&B Vocal Performance GRAMMY for "It's Not Right But It's Okay" at the 42nd GRAMMY Awards

GRAMMYs/Apr 10, 2020 - 09:01 pm

Late, great pop/R&B queen Whitney Houston was no stranger to winning GRAMMYs in the year 2000, having famously won Record Of The Year for "I Will Always Love You" in the mid-'90s and Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female for "Saving All My Love For You" and "I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)" in the mid-'80s. 

As the new millennium came around, at the 42nd GRAMMY Awards, Houston returned to the GRAMMY stage to accept Best Female R&B Vocal Performance for "It's Not Right But It's Okay," which appeared on her 1998 album, My Love Is Your Love

The album itself received six nominations, including Best R&B Album and Best R&B Song. Walking onstage to accept her award from Busta Rhymes, Jamie Foxx and actress Jane Krakowski, Houston gave a breathless speech, thanking her family and husband, Bobby Brown: "I'd like to thank my parents, my mom and dad, BMG, everyone at Arista—honey, this one's for you, the original R&B king."

Watch the GRAMMY Rewind moment above. 

Babyface Reflects On Collaborating With Whitney, Toni, Ella Mai & More: How The Legendary Hitmaker Learned To "Speak In Their Voices"
Babyface

Photo: Travis Bailey

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Babyface Reflects On Collaborating With Whitney, Toni, Ella Mai & More: How The Legendary Hitmaker Learned To "Speak In Their Voices"

Babyface has enough Top 10 singles to keep a playlist bumping for hours. The songwriter and producer discusses his most memorable productions, many of which tell compelling stories from a woman's perspective.

GRAMMYs/Jan 24, 2023 - 05:59 pm

You didn't have to live through the '90s to know that 11-time GRAMMY winner Babyface is the mastermind behind so many of the decade's biggest R&B hits. Whitney Houston's "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)," Boyz II Men's "End of the Road," and Toni Braxton's "You're Makin' Me High" are just a few No. 1 singles penned by the Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee.

Babyface's legendary status is driven home by 125 Top 10 writer/producer credits, top-tier collaborations with Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Barbra Streisand, Beyoncé, and Eric Clapton, plus his own iconic hits, such as "Whip Appeal," "When Can I See You," and "Every Time I Close My Eyes." But telling compelling stories — especially from the female perspective — is arguably one of his greatest strengths, as evidenced most recently on Girls' Night Out

The 13-track collaboration project champions some of today's brightest female R&B stars, including Ari Lennox, Kehlani, and Queen Naija. Lead single "Keeps on Fallin'" with Ella Mai is nominated for Best Traditional R&B Performance at the 2023 GRAMMYs, which means he's now surpassed 50 GRAMMY nominations. "It was a nice surprise," Babyface tells GRAMMY.com. "It inspires you to keep doing the work."

A master of his craft, Babyface did his homework before getting in the studio with each artist on Girls' Night Out. "I needed to learn how people spoke and how melodies are different. Otherwise, I don't know if I would've been able to speak in their voices," he shares. "I have a much clearer understanding of today's R&B because there is a difference, and it's not necessarily a difference that's any better or any worse. It's just a difference in terms of time, and that's what made the process enjoyable to me."

Though Babyface took more of a mentoring approach with Girls' Night Out, he's no stranger to fostering talented female singers, particularly on the soundtrack for the 1995 movie Waiting to Exhale — which exclusively features Black women. The OST boasts a string of No. 1 and Top 10 hits penned entirely by Babyface himself, including beloved classics like Braxton's "Let It Flow" and Brandy's "Sittin' Up in My Room." 

Yet "Not Gon' Cry" by Mary J. Blige — who is nominated in six categories at the 65th GRAMMY Awards — remains among Babyface's most memorable productions for Waiting To Exhale. The timeless ballad, written from character Bernadine’s point of view after her husband of 11 years leaves her for another woman, emerged as the Black woman's anthem for showing resilience in the face of romantic heartbreak and betrayal, but the song almost didn't happen.

"The opening lyrics, 'While all the time that I was loving you, you were busy loving yourself,' just sounded like a real-life conversation, and it sounded like something Mary could say," Babyface explains. "I played it for Andre Harrell, and he said, 'It's okay, but I don't think it's the record for her… Mary's too young for this. She's not 47 years old and she ain't been married and all that.'"

He continues, "My answer to him was, 'Mary's singing for everyone else… and she ultimately became a voice for other women.' It wasn't her personal story, but her voice could deliver that."

Babyface's musical legacy developed further with the formation of LaFace Records in 1989 with music executive L.A. Reid. In the label’s glory days, LaFace launched the careers of Braxton, TLC, OutKast, Pink, Usher, Ciara, Goodie Mob, and Donell Jones. But one of his most impressive feats isn't talked about enough: that Whitney Houston selected Babyface to help usher in the more R&B-oriented sound of her third studio album, 1990's I'm Your Baby Tonight.

"They came to LaFace because they wanted a Blacker record, but when I was writing 'I'm Your Baby Tonight,' I wasn't thinking R&B… I was just writing a Whitney record," he says. "There's an urban flavor to it, but the truth is it wasn't that R&B, but everything is R&B if a Black artist touches it… the idea was to run away from songs like 'How Will I Know' and 'I Wanna Dance with Somebody' that were big records for her that they said weren't Black enough."

Babyface and Houston proved to be a winning musical duo, and "I'm Your Baby Tonight" was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female at the 33rd GRAMMY Awards. The collaboration also gave Houston her eighth No. 1 hit, tying with Madonna for the female artist with most No. 1s on the Billboard Hot 100 at the time.

The success with divas like Houston and Braxton allowed Babyface to explore his versatility as a hitmaker for superstars outside of the R&B realm. For the lush sounds heard on Madonna's sixth studio album, Bedtime Stories, the pop icon teamed up with Dallas Austin, Dave Hall, and of course Babyface, who co-wrote "Forbidden Love" and "Take a Bow." The latter song became her longest running No. 1 hit.

"The track was already laid down and when we brought in the live strings, which was Madonna's suggestion, it became a whole other thing. I think it was the combination of my background vocals behind Madonna's that just made for a very unique song in that sense for her," Babyface recalls. "She was nervous because she just wasn't used to singing that controlled and being that vulnerable. I remember how we sat there and wrote the song together [at the Hit Factory Studios in New York City], so that's a really cool memory."

As the 64-year-old musician enters the next stage of his four-decade career, he has plenty to look forward to: Touring with eight-time GRAMMY winner Anita Baker, a possible deluxe version of Girls' Night Out, and the upcoming 30th anniversary of his third studio album, For the Cool in You, which spawned the top 5 hit "When Can I See You." (The acoustic tune earned Babyface his first GRAMMY for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance.)

For all his success, Babyface has remained humble and his greatest joy comes from being able to hear a talented vocalist bring a song he wrote to life. "The best part is when you get into the studio with this idea, this little demo and then, when someone like Whitney, Aretha, or Boyz II Men sings your song, it becomes a hit before your eyes," he says. "They take it to a place I never imagined it could go."

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GRAMMY Rewind: Green Day Celebrates The "Danger And Fun" Of Rock As They Win A GRAMMY For 'American Idiot' In 2005
Green Day at the 2005 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Courtesy of the Recording Academy

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GRAMMY Rewind: Green Day Celebrates The "Danger And Fun" Of Rock As They Win A GRAMMY For 'American Idiot' In 2005

As Green Day accepted their Best Rock Album GRAMMY for 'American Idiot,' frontman Billie Joe Armstrong made sure to spotlight the culture of rock and roll.

GRAMMYs/Jan 6, 2023 - 06:15 pm

Nearly two decades after its release, Green Day's American Idiot remains one of the best-selling punk rock albums, both from the group's discography and within the genre. Home to Green Day's iconic tracks "American Idiot" and "Wake Me Up When September Ends," the 2004 album solidified Green Day's reputation within the rock world — and helped them win a GRAMMY.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, revisit the trio's GRAMMY win for Best Rock Album for American Idiot in 2005. The group's seventh studio album brought in five other nominations that year: the prestigious Album of the Year category, as well as Record of the Year, Best Rock Duo/Group Vocal Performance, Best Rock Song, and Best Short Form Music Video for "American Idiot."

As the group accepted their Best Rock Album gramophone, each member took a turn at the mic thanking various contributors to American Idiot, including producer Rob Cavallo and their manager, Pat Magnarella.

"Everybody at Warner Bros., thank you for your hard work here," bassist Mike Dirnt praised. "All the fans. Everyone at radio that plays rock and roll music still."

To close out the speech, frontman Billie Joe Armstrong echoed the support for rock music. "We know rock and roll can be dangerous and fun at the same time," he said, "so thanks a lot!"

Press play on the video above to watch Green Day's complete acceptance speech for Best Rock Album at the 47th GRAMMY Awards, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more episodes of GRAMMY Rewind.

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Press Play On GRAMMY U Mixtape: New Year, It’s Poppin'! Monthly Member Playlist

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Press Play On GRAMMY U Mixtape: New Year, It’s Poppin'! Monthly Member Playlist

The GRAMMY U Mixtape is a monthly, genre-spanning playlist to quench your thirst for new tunes, all from student members. GRAMMY U celebrates new beginnings with fresh pop tunes that will kickstart 2023.

GRAMMYs/Jan 6, 2023 - 12:17 am

Did you know that among all of the students in GRAMMY U, songwriting and performance is one of the most sought after fields of study? We want to create a space to hear what these students are creating today!

The GRAMMY U Mixtape, now available for your listening pleasure, highlights the creations and fresh ideas that students are bringing to this industry directly on the Recording Academy's Spotify and Apple Music pages. Our goal is to celebrate GRAMMY U members, as well as the time and effort they put into making original music — from the songwriting process to the final production of the track.

Each month, we accept submissions and feature 20 to 25 songs that match that month’s theme. This month we're ringing in 2023 with our New Year, It's Poppin'! playlist, which features fresh pop songs that bring new year, new you vibes. Showcasing talented members from our various chapters, we felt these songs represented the positivity and hopefulness that GRAMMY U members embody as they tackle this upcoming year of exciting possibilities.

So, what’s stopping you? Press play on GRAMMY U’s Mixtape and listen now on Spotify below and Apple Music.

Want to be featured on the next playlist? Submit your songs today! We are currently accepting submissions for songs of all genres for consideration for our February playlist. Whether you write pop, rock, hip hop, jazz, or classical, we want to hear from you. Music must be written and/or produced by the student member (an original song) and you must be able to submit a Spotify and/or Apple Music link to the song. Students must be a GRAMMY U member to submit.

About GRAMMY U:

GRAMMY U is a program that connects college students with the industry's brightest and most talented minds and provides those aspiring professionals with the tools and opportunities necessary to start a career in music.     

Throughout each semester, events and special programs touch on all facets of the industry, including the business, technology, and the creative process.

As part of the Recording Academy's mission to ensure the recorded arts remain a thriving part of our shared cultural heritage, GRAMMY U establishes the necessary foundation for music’s next generation to flourish.

Not a member, but want to submit to our playlist? Apply for GRAMMY U Membership here.

GRAMMY Rewind: MC Hammer Accepts A GRAMMY For "U Can't Touch This" With Gratitude, Faith & Patriotism On His Mind In 1991
MC Hammer at the 1991 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Robin Platzer/IMAGES/Getty Images

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GRAMMY Rewind: MC Hammer Accepts A GRAMMY For "U Can't Touch This" With Gratitude, Faith & Patriotism On His Mind In 1991

MC Hammer spoke from the heart as he claimed his trophy for Best Rap Solo Performance for "U Can't Touch This," one of two GRAMMYs he won for the rap classic.

GRAMMYs/Dec 30, 2022 - 06:33 pm

Today, MC Hammer's "U Can't Touch This" is known as one of the defining rap classics of the early '90s. Of course, the song was a massive hit upon its release, too — and it scored Hammer two golden gramophones at the 1991 GRAMMYs, in both rap and R&B categories.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, turn back the clock to 1991 and revisit Hammer's heartfelt, off-the-cuff acceptance speech for Best Rap Solo Performance. As he stood at the podium, the rapper admitted he didn't have the complete list of names of people he wanted to thank — so instead, he spoke from the heart.

"First of all, I would like to thank God for this honor," Hammer said. "Without Him, I know it's not possible."

He went on to thank the people at his record label who supported him throughout the creation of the song, and concluded with a mention of something that was weighing heavy on the hearts of many in early 1991: the Gulf War.

"Once again, I would like to send this one out to the family and the men and women who are putting their lives on the line for us in the Persian Gulf," Hammer concluded before he left the stage, receiving a rousing round of applause. 

The early-'90s Middle East conflict was a hot topic in the U.S. at the time of the 33rd GRAMMY Awards. Just before the 1991 GRAMMYs took place, Hammer was part of a star-studded, all-genre cast of singers who recorded a new group version of John Lennon's "Give Peace a Chance" in light of the war. 

Press play on the video above to watch Hammer's full acceptance speech for Best Rap Solo Performance, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind. 

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