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GRAMMY Rewind: Watch The Black Keys Beat Out Coldplay And Bruce Springsteen To Win Best Rock Performance For "Lonely Boy" In 2013
The Black Keys

Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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GRAMMY Rewind: Watch The Black Keys Beat Out Coldplay And Bruce Springsteen To Win Best Rock Performance For "Lonely Boy" In 2013

In the newest episode of GRAMMY Rewind, the Black Keys keep their acceptance speech brief after winning Best Rock Performance for "Lonely Boy" in 2013

GRAMMYs/Jan 21, 2022 - 12:53 pm

The Best Rock Performance category at the 55th GRAMMY Awards was stacked. To date, the five nominees — Coldplay, Bruce Springsteen, Alabama Shakes, Mumford & Sons, and the Black Keys — have earned a combined 37 GRAMMY wins and over 100 nominations throughout their careers.

However, despite the vaunted field, Black Keys members Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney kept their cool when accepting the GRAMMY for "Lonely Boy" in 2013. Sporting matching black leather jackets, the two-man lineup spent a total of 20 seconds on stage, thanking their friends, label and hometown.

Watch the Akron, Ohio, natives deliver their succinct acceptance speech below.

The Black Keys' night was far from over, though, as the duo would make their way on stage on two more occasions: to make their GRAMMY performance debut (alongside Dr.John and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band), and to accept the GRAMMY for Best Rock Album for their 2011 LP El Camino.

"Lonely Boy" served as the opening track on El Camino and reached No. 1 on several Billboard charts in 2011, including U.S. Rock Songs. The chart-topping track and multi-platinum album also earned the Black Keys Record Of The Year and Album Of The Year nominations.

Explore more GRAMMY Awards history below and check back every Friday for new editions of GRAMMY Rewind.

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GRAMMY Rewind: Brandi Carlile Nervously Accepts Her First GRAMMY After "The Joke" Wins In 2019
Brandi Carlile at the 2019 GRAMMYs.

Photo: David Crotty/Patrick McMullan

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GRAMMY Rewind: Brandi Carlile Nervously Accepts Her First GRAMMY After "The Joke" Wins In 2019

Fourteen years into her career, Brandi Carlile won her first GRAMMY award — and because the long-awaited victory was so meaningful, she couldn't help "violently shaking" on stage.

GRAMMYs/Jun 2, 2023 - 05:02 pm

Brandi Carlile has been making waves in the Americana community for nearly two decades. But in 2019, Carlile's career began a different — and much bigger — trajectory thanks to a little song called "The Joke." 

The lead single from her sixth studio album, By the Way, I Forgive You, "The Joke" is dedicated to marginalized communities who constantly feel underrepresented and unloved by society. As a trailblazer in the LBGTQIA+ community, her impassioned vocal performance struck fans and critics alike.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, we revisit the day "The Joke" helped Carlile win her first golden gramophone, for Best American Roots Performance. (It was one of three GRAMMYs Carlile took home that night, as "The Joke" also won Best American Roots Song and By the Way, I Forgive You won Best Americana Album.)

"It's our first GRAMMY!" Carlile cheered alongside her longtime collaborators Phil and Tim Hanseroth. "This means so much to me [...] and Dave Cobb, who wrote this song and brought the best out in us. We can't thank you enough."

Carlile went on to praise her team at Elektra Records and her family. "So many people to thank, but I'm violently shaking right now," she added, then passed the mic to the Hanseroth twins. 

Before the trio left the stage, Carlile quipped, "Whoever we forgot, forgive us. You know we love you, and you know we're terrified!" 

Press play on the video above to watch Brandi Carlile's complete acceptance speech for Best American Roots Performance at the 2019 GRAMMYs, and check back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind.

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GRAMMY Rewind: Faith Hill Graciously Thanks Her Supporters After 'Breathe' Wins Best Country Album In 2001
Faith Hill at the 2001 GRAMMYs.

Photo: HECTOR MATA/AFP via Getty Images

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GRAMMY Rewind: Faith Hill Graciously Thanks Her Supporters After 'Breathe' Wins Best Country Album In 2001

After winning Best Country Album for 'Breathe' — one of her three wins at the 2001 GRAMMYs — Faith Hill delivered a heartfelt speech thanking her family for helping her achieve her dreams, and her team for making that dream a reality.

GRAMMYs/May 26, 2023 - 05:02 pm

When Dolly Parton, flanked by Brad Paisley, handed Faith Hill her GRAMMY for Best Country Album in 2001 — for her classic 1999 album Breathe — it felt like a passing of the torch.*

The first words out of an awestruck Hill's mouth, to Parton: "Wow! And coming from you, thank you so much. I just admire you so much."

Hill went on to deliver a heartfelt speech, in which she thanked her parents for helping facilitate her music dreams and expressed how long and hard her journey to the GRAMMYs stage was.

Breathe helped Hill take home three GRAMMYs that night — the others being Best Female Country Vocal Performance ("Breathe") and Best Country Collaboration With Vocals ("Let's Make Love," with three-time GRAMMY-winning husband Tim McGraw.)

Check out the throwback to Y2K-era country music history above, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more episodes of GRAMMY Rewind.

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GRAMMY Rewind: Daft Punk Shares "Love" For Macklemore After 'Random Access Memories' Wins Album Of The Year In 2014
Daft Punk on stage with Nile Rodgers (left), Paul Williams (center) and Pharrell Williams (center right) at the 2014 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Michael Tran/FilmMagic

GRAMMY Rewind: Daft Punk Shares "Love" For Macklemore After 'Random Access Memories' Wins Album Of The Year In 2014

Notorious for their silent (and masked) appearances, French EDM duo Daft Punk had 'Random Access Memories' collaborator Paul Williams deliver their heartwarming message at the 56th GRAMMY Awards — which included a shout-out to Macklemore.

GRAMMYs/May 17, 2023 - 05:00 pm

This year, Daft Punk is celebrating their 20th anniversary. Their groundbreaking album Random Access Memories also celebrates a milestone anniversary in 2023, turning 10 on May 17.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, we turn back the clock to 2014, when Daft Punk won the prestigious Album of the Year award for Random Access Memories. Notorious for their silent, faceless appearances, musical legend Paul Williams accepted the duo's award while they stood back.

"Back when I was drinking and using, I used to imagine things that weren't there that were frightening. Then, I got sober, and two robots called me and asked me to make an album," Williams joked at the beginning of the speech.

"I just got a message from the robots, and what they wanted me to say is that as elegant and as classy as the GRAMMY has ever been is the moment when we saw those wonderful marriages," Williams said, referring to Macklemore's revolutionary performance of "Same Love" at the same ceremony. "'Same Love' is fantastic, and it was the height of fairness and the power of love for all people at any time, in any combination."

Williams went on to praise Daft Punk's generous spirit, their fellow collaborators, and the love that went into making the album.

Press play on the video above to watch Paul Williams' full acceptance speech for Daft Punk's Random Access Memories, and check back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind.

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GRAMMY Rewind: Macy Gray Praises Hip-Hop & Her Legendary Mentors After "I Try" Wins In 2001
Macy Gray at the 2001 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images

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GRAMMY Rewind: Macy Gray Praises Hip-Hop & Her Legendary Mentors After "I Try" Wins In 2001

Macy Gray gave a shout-out to Prince, Chaka Khan, Stevie Wonder and Sly Stone during a quick but heartfelt acceptance speech for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 43rd GRAMMY Awards.

GRAMMYs/May 12, 2023 - 05:00 pm

After having a whirlwind year thanks to her runaway hit "I Try," Macy Gray celebrated yet another accomplishment thanks to the ubiquitous jam: her first GRAMMY.

In this episode of GRAMMY Rewind, we flashback to the evening Gray won the Best Female Pop Vocal Performance award for her chart-topping single, "I Try." Though her acceptance speech was short and sweet, she made sure the people who got her there — starting off with her biggest inspirations.  

"I just want to thank all of my mentors, like Prince, Chaka Khan, Stevie Wonder, Sly Stone," Gray said at the start of her speech. She went on to praise the hip-hop community, her band and her family.

"I'm really flattered by all of you who voted for me. Thanks!" Gray exclaimed as she made her way off the stage.

Gray also scored Record of the Year and Song of the Year nominations for "I Try" that year. The year prior, she was up for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance for "Do Something" as well as the coveted Best New Artist. 

Press play on the video above to watch Macy Gray's quick but gracious acceptance speech for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 2001 GRAMMYs, and check back to GRAMMY.com every Friday for more new episodes of GRAMMY Rewind. 

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