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Trevor Noah Returns To Host The 2023 GRAMMYs On Feb. 5
Trevor Noah

Photo: Michael Schwartz

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Trevor Noah Returns To Host The 2023 GRAMMYs On Feb. 5

Third time’s the charm: Emmy Award-winning comedian Trevor Noah will return as master of ceremonies for the 2023 GRAMMYs, Music's Biggest Night.

GRAMMYs/Dec 15, 2022 - 04:00 pm

GRAMMY-nominated comedian, actor, author and former TV host Trevor Noah graced the GRAMMYs stage as master of ceremonies back in 2021 and 2022. Now, he's going to bring his formidable, Emmy-winning talents back to host the 2023 GRAMMYs, which take place Sunday, Feb. 5, and will broadcast live on the CBS Television Network and stream live and on-demand on Paramount+ at 8-11:30 p.m. ET/5-8:30 p.m. PT from the Crypto.com Arena in Los Angeles.

Noah, who recently left his post as host of “The Daily Show,” confirmed the news today on his social media. Noah was also featured on the cover of this year's Billboard GRAMMY Voter Guide issue, released this morning.

2023 marks Noah’s third consecutive year hosting the GRAMMYs; he will also serve as a producer on the show.

“I’m enjoying the fact that we’re juggling flaming swords,” Noah told Billboard of his experience hosting the GRAMMYs. “Just putting it all together, combining different genres, getting the musicians in sync with each other and the audience, keeping the audience in tune with what’s happening. One of my favorite things about the GRAMMYs as a whole is it is one of the few places where you get to experience artists in their rawest element, which is performing their music live … there’s nothing like it. You develop a deep appreciation for what these people are doing beyond just the music that they make.”

Keep watching this space for more thrilling news as the world ramps up to Music's Biggest Night!

2023 GRAMMY Nominations: See The Complete Nominees List


The 2023 GRAMMYs, officially known as the 65th GRAMMY Awards, returns to Los Angeles' Crypto.com Arena on Sunday, Feb. 5, 2023, and will broadcast live on the CBS Television Network and stream live and on-demand on Paramount+ at 8-11:30 p.m. ET/5-8:30 p.m. PT.

The eligibility period for the 65th GRAMMY Awards is Friday, Oct. 1, 2021 – Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. All eligible awards entries must be released within this timeframe.

The Recording Academy and GRAMMY.com do not endorse any particular artist, submission or nominee over another. The results of the GRAMMY Awards, including winners and nominees, are solely dependent on the Recording Academy’s Voting Membership.

Listen: Playlists To Honor Global Impact Award Honorees Dr. Dre, Missy Elliott, Lil Wayne, & Sylvia Rhone
(L to R): Dr. Dre, Missy Elliott, Lil Wayne

Photos: Christopher Polk/Staff / Getty Images; Bennett Raglin / Stringer / Getty Images; Jeff Kravitz / Contributor / Getty Images

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Listen: Playlists To Honor Global Impact Award Honorees Dr. Dre, Missy Elliott, Lil Wayne, & Sylvia Rhone

As these independent legacies are set to receive a Global Impact Award at The Recording Academy Honors Presented By The Black Music Collective Event, rediscover honorees Dr.Dre, Missy Elliott, and Lil Wayne with these playlists.

GRAMMYs/Feb 2, 2023 - 11:00 pm

Ahead of the 2023 GRAMMYs, revered GRAMMY Award-winning artists Dr. Dre, Missy Elliott, and Lil Wayne and music executive Sylvia Rhone will each receive the Recording Academy Global Impact Award for their personal and professional achievements in the music industry at the Recording Academy Honors Presented By The Black Music Collective.

The second annual Black Music Collective event and official GRAMMY Week event takes place Thursday, Feb. 2, at the Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles and is sponsored by Amazon Music and Google Pixel Phone. It will once again feature first-time GRAMMY nominee Adam Blackstone as the musical director of the evening. Recording Academy Board of Trustees Vice Chair Rico Love will also return to Chair the event.

Dr. Dre is a seven-time GRAMMY Award-winning artist, producer, founder, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and CEO of Aftermath Entertainment and Beats Electronics. His career has spanned over three decades starting as a member of the World Class Wreckin’ Cru shortly after, he co-founded the revolutionary group N.W.A.  In 1996, Dre launched Aftermath Entertainment, where over the years, he discovered hip-hop superstars such as 50 Cent, The Game, Kendrick Lamar, Anderson Paak, and Eminem.

Missy 'Misdemeanor' Elliott has remained relevant as a true visionary and pioneer for women in hip-hop for over 25 years. The multi-GRAMMY-Award-winning rapper, singer, songwriter, and producer made an immediate impact on the music industry with her critically acclaimed debut album Supa Dupa Fly. Her experimental sound and groundbreaking music videos changed the music landscape and challenged artists not to conform to the norm. Among other awards and accolades, Elliott became the first woman rapper inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. The Virginia native has produced for and collaborated with artists such as Aaliyah, Beyoncé, Janet Jackson, Mariah Carey, Ciara, Lil' Kim, J. Cole, Busta Rhymes, Ludacris, Chris Brown, and Lil Wayne.

Lil Wayne has left a lasting impact on the culture as a five-time GRAMMY Award-winning, multiplatinum rap icon, Young Money Entertainment founder and CEO, Young Money APAA Sports founder, acclaimed author, pro skater, and philanthropist. By 2020, he cemented his legacy forever as "one of the best-selling artists of all time." Among many milestones, he emerged as "the first male artist to surpass Elvis Presley with the most entries on the Billboard Hot 100," logging a staggering 183 entries – the third most of all time. Simultaneously, Wayne owns and operates Young Money Entertainment, the company that ignited the careers of Drake, Nicki Minaj, Tyga, and many more.

Sylvia Rhone has set the pace for the music industry as one of the most impactful, influential, and important executives in history. She has devoted her professional life to music, she broke a glass ceiling for the first time, and changed the landscape forever as the “only African American and first woman ever” to be named Chairwoman and CEO of Elektra Entertainment Group in 1994. She made history once more in 2019 when Sony Music Entertainment selected her as Chairwoman and C.E.O of Epic Records, enshrining her as "the first woman CEO of a major record label owned by a Fortune 500 company and the first Black woman to attain such a title." Along the way, Rhone has impressively left an indelible imprint on pop, hip-hop, rock, heavy metal, R&B, soul, and electronic music with an impeccable track record. She has shepherded the success of everyone from Missy Elliott, Anita Baker, the late Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Jason Mraz, Busta Rhymes, Pantera, and Metallica to Lil Wayne, Kelly Rowland, Akon, Kid Cudi, Nicki Minaj, A Tribe Called Quest, Fabolous, Tamia, and Gerald Levert, just to name a few. Currently, she is at the helm of Epic Records where she has overseen historic releases from Future, Travis Scott, 21 Savage, DJ Khaled, Camila Cabello, and many more. A music industry trailblazer for four decades, Rhone has catalyzed the careers of artists who have changed music and the world at large — and she will continue to do so.

As these independent legacies are set to be honored with a Global Impact Award for their personal and professional achievements in the music industry, rediscover Dr.Dre, Missy Elliott, and Lil Wayne with these playlists curated by Amazon’s music experts.

GRAMMY Style Edit: Stylist Zerina Akers Reflects On Her "Timeless" GRAMMY Looks For Beyoncé, Jazmine Sullivan & Chloe X Halle
Zerina Akers

Photo: Edwig Henson

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GRAMMY Style Edit: Stylist Zerina Akers Reflects On Her "Timeless" GRAMMY Looks For Beyoncé, Jazmine Sullivan & Chloe X Halle

In this episode of GRAMMY Style Edit, Zerina Akers revisits her recently styled looks at the GRAMMYs, including Beyoncé's outfit for her history-making night in 2021 and Jazmine Sullivan's suit for her first GRAMMY win in 2022.

GRAMMYs/Feb 2, 2023 - 09:21 pm

For award-winning stylist and costume designer Zerina Akers, fashion is the purest way to express our ideal selves — and she gets to help superstars like Beyoncé do just that.

In this episode of GRAMMY Style Edit, Akers breaks down a few of her styled looks in recent GRAMMY history. She's the mastermind behind Beyoncé's iconic black leather and gold ensemble from the 2021 GRAMMY Awards, a look Akers describes as a "refreshing take on fashion" to coincide with the singer's historical winning moment

Akers has served as the R&B diva's personal stylist since 2014, and attributes her knack for creating memorable style moments — especially for performances, her personal favorite thing to style — to "the School of Beyonce." (She was the costume designer for Beyoncé's GRAMMY-winning film Black Is King, which won Akers an Emmy in 2021.) 

In her everyday life, Akers defines her style as androgynous, with an added eclectic twist on wardrobe basics. She utilizes this approach in her work with Jazmine Sullivan, who Akers styled in a tribal-print black leather suit at the 2022 GRAMMY Awards, and Chloe x Halle, who wore sleek, structural black gowns during their 2019 GRAMMY performance.

"GRAMMY styling, specifically, is always so special," Akers says. "It's important for me to approach it with a timeless sensibility. Will this stand the test of time? Will these images, in 20 years, still be fab?"

Press play on this video to learn more about Zerina Akers' genius behind some of her most recent GRAMMY looks, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of GRAMMY Style Edit.

A Timeline Of Beyoncé's GRAMMY Moments, From Her First Win With Destiny's Child to Making History With 'Renaissance'

Road To The GRAMMYs: DJ Terry Hunter Details His Remixing Journey That Led To A GRAMMY Nomination With Beyoncé
Terry Hunter

Photo: Courtesy of Terry Hunter

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Road To The GRAMMYs: DJ Terry Hunter Details His Remixing Journey That Led To A GRAMMY Nomination With Beyoncé

"Break My Soul" remixer Terry Hunter recounts the childhood moment that inspired him to start remixing music, and how he ended up remixing Beyoncé's smash 'Renaissance' single — which earned him a nomination for Best Remixed Recording at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

GRAMMYs/Feb 2, 2023 - 08:00 pm

After 10-year-old Terry Hunter experienced the adrenaline rush of hearing his favorite songs live, there was no turning back.

For the rest of his adolescence, the future DJ, remixer and producer spent countless nights perfecting his craft. He networked with other local disc jockeys, including prominent house remixers Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy, where he realized the secret to success: "What made you stand out is that you had a version of a record that no other DJ had," he tells GRAMMY.com.

Hunter's self-produced remixes eventually landed him a No. 1 hit and a contract with Jive Records. From there, he collaborated with music legend Aretha Franklin and, ultimately, had the opportunity to work on Beyoncé's most recent chart-buster, "Break My Soul," which is nominated for Best Remixed Recording at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

"I want to bring this trophy home, but I feel like I've won already, so that's the most exciting part to me," he says, adding with a smile, "we're going to LA, b—es!"

Press play on the video above to hear Hunter's complete Road To The GRAMMYs story. Keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more episodes of Road To The GRAMMYs, and tune into CBS on Feb. 5 to watch the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Road To The GRAMMYs: How Matt B's Musical Upbringing (And A Fateful Party) Led To This First GRAMMY Nomination

Meet The 2023 Music Educator Award Recipient: How Pamela Dawson Helps Her Students Achieve Healing And Catharsis
Pamela Dawson

Photo courtesy of Pamela Dawson

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Meet The 2023 Music Educator Award Recipient: How Pamela Dawson Helps Her Students Achieve Healing And Catharsis

Pamela Dawson, the recipient of the Recording Academy's 2023 Music Educator Award, encourages her students to channel their energy and passions into their singing, and to move in ways that help express their voices.

GRAMMYs/Feb 2, 2023 - 03:38 pm

For Pamela Dawson, the recipient of the 2023 Music Educator Award, making music isn’t just about creating sound waves — it’s about how the movements a person makes can affect the sounds they create. As director of choral music at DeSoto High School in DeSoto, Texas, she uses kinesthesia to help her students find their own voices.

“With choral music, it's all about interpretation,” Dawson says. “What does each word mean? What does each note mean? We use the whole body; we're not just using our mouth, we're not just hearing. We can see the music in front of us, and we're reading it and we hear it, but can you literally feel it?”

Kinesthetic movement is key to Dawson’s teaching methods. She encourages her students to channel their energy and passions into their singing, and to move in ways that help express their voices. These movements also help establish timing and rhythm, and Dawson notes a meditative quality to the movements that is heightened by the hand instruments they use.

“I'm used to the harp being on the entire body with the sound waves going into the body and to the central nervous system,” she says. “There's a healing and a calming process that happens with the harp. Handbells and hand chimes have that same pure tone and actually help calm the spirit.”

For 15 years, Dawson has taught varsity chorus, handbells and piano at the Dallas-area city’s high school, while also overseeing the choral programs at the district’s middle schools to ensure the students are on track to perform at the high school level.

Dawson grew up in Detroit surrounded by a musical family. When her father put her on piano at age 7, she had already been playing harp for two years thanks to instruction from her godsister, the late jazz harpist Dorothy Ashby. In high school, she played clarinet in the school band, and majored in voice with a harp minor in college.

Although music had a large presence in her life, Dawson never planned to teach. She had an administrative job in the private sector she enjoyed when a friend asked her to help with a choral class. The first time she stood in front of the class, she knew she had found her calling. “I walked in the first day and said, ‘Oh my God, what have I been doing all my life? I've been in the wrong career.’ And I fell in love with teaching choral music.”

Dawson has worked extensively with the Texas Music Educators Association and has served as chair of the DeSoto Arts Commission, where she helped organize music festivals and events that have often included her students. In 2022, she was inducted into the DeSoto Independent School District Hall of Honor.

Dawson’s students have gone on to study music at prestigious schools such as Berklee College of Music, and to successful careers in music in Broadway productions. But her true success as a teacher, she says, is helping students discover the music inside of them — and discovering ways to incorporate it into their lives and careers.

“Music is a passion,” she says. “If you have music, you can't run away from it. You can’t hide.”

This article appears in the 2023 GRAMMYs program book, which is available to read here.

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