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It Goes To 11: Watch Amanda Shires Open Up About The Fiddle Of Her Dreams

Amanda Shires

Photo: Schmelling

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It Goes To 11: Watch Amanda Shires Open Up About The Fiddle Of Her Dreams

In the debut episode of It Goes To 11 — a GRAMMY.com video series in which musicians explain their favorite gear — watch Americana singer/songwriter Amanda Shires discuss how she lost her prized fiddle, but gained one with a fascinating story behind it

GRAMMYs/Dec 16, 2021 - 09:00 pm

Can you imagine your prized instrument shattering onstage? It's every musician's nightmare, and Amanda Shires lived it.

Luckily, when she headed to a music shop to procure a replacement, the GRAMMY-winning Americana singer/songwriter found one with a captivating backstory. She knew it was exactly what she needed.

In the inaugural episode of It Goes To 11 — a GRAMMY.com video series in which musicians explain their favorite gear — watch Shires detail the moment her go-to fiddle bit the dust and the engaging history behind its replacement. (Her festive new album, For Christmas, is available everywhere now.)

Check out the clip above and keep checking GRAMMY.com for more episodes of It Goes To 11.

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Sheryl Crow, Mavis Staples, More To Perform At Jason Isbell's ShoalsFest

Sheryl Crow 

Photo: Taylor Hill/Getty Images

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Sheryl Crow, Mavis Staples, More To Perform At Jason Isbell's ShoalsFest

Isbell also announced that he would perform with his band Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit

GRAMMYs/Mar 19, 2019 - 03:48 am

GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter Jason Isbell is bringing Sheryl Crow, Mavis Staples, Amanda Shires and more to his hometown of Muscle Shoals, Ala., for the first-ever ShoalsFest.

Isbell also announced that the fest would feature a performance from his band Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit.

According to the fest's website, more artists will be announced for the one-day event taking place on Oct. 5 at McFarland Park in Florence, Ala., which is part of the Florence-Muscle Shoals Metropolitan area.


"We’ve got ourselves a festival in the Shoals! @amandashires, @mavisstaples, @SherylCrow, and my rock band will play! Tickets on sale March 25. Come see," Isbell tweeted.

Muscle Shores is home to the Muscle Shoals Sound studio, which became a prominent place or R&B, rock and pop during the '60s and '70s, as NPR reports

Isbell said in a statement that he'd always wanted to bring a festival to the Shoals area. "McFarland Park is the perfect place to enjoy world-class artists and the beauty of the Singing River," the musician said. "These acts are all personal favorites of ours, and we’re proud to bring them to our hometown and show them a good time. I hope y’all are as excited as we are about ShoalsFest 2019."

Tickets for the festival go on sale March 25. For more information, visit the ShoalsFest website

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Lady Gaga, Kacey Musgraves Donate Gear For Girls Rock Camp Alliance Auction

Lady Gaga

Photo: Christopher Polk

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Lady Gaga, Kacey Musgraves Donate Gear For Girls Rock Camp Alliance Auction

Dolly Parton, Sharon Van Etten, Hayley Williams, Reba McEntire, and Fergie have also contributed items to the auction to benefit the non-profit organization

GRAMMYs/May 9, 2018 - 07:11 pm

Lady Gaga, Dolly Parton, and Kacey Musgraves are among the ist of top female artists who have donated their personal gear for a new auction benefitting the non-profit Girls Rock Camp Alliance, which supports more than 100 summer camp and music education programs around the world for female, transgender, and gender non-conforming youth.

The star-studded list also includes Paramore's Hayley Williams, Lydia Loveless, Marian Hill, Melissa Etheridge, Evanescence, Tal Wilkenfeld, Amanda Shires, Sharon Van Etten, Fergie, Mindi Abair, Charlie XCX, Reba McEntire, Imogen Heap, Against Me!'s Laura Jane Grace, and more.

Items up for the auction, which is hosted by the online marketplace Reverb, include microphones, guitar effects pedals, instruments, concert tickets, memorabilia, and more.

"My sister and I were very lucky to have inspiring resources at our fingertips and people championing us to find our passions very early in life. We need more perspectives of strong women living on through art and music, so I’m happy to support Girls Rock," said Musgraves, who is donating a mixer and an autographed plastic pink flamingo.

The auction launches on May 10 on Reverb's website.

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It Goes To 11: Jorge Drexler's Favorite Spanish Guitar Has A Special Childhood Connection
Jorge Drexler

Photo: Anton Goiri

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It Goes To 11: Jorge Drexler's Favorite Spanish Guitar Has A Special Childhood Connection

In this episode of It Goes To 11, Uruguay-born musician Jorge Drexler introduces fans to his favorite classical guitar and explains why it's the most essential instrument he owns.

GRAMMYs/Jun 1, 2022 - 02:11 pm

Uruguayan singer/songwriter Jorge Drexler's life path included training as a medical doctor — specializing in otolaryngology, the study of diseases of the ear and throat. Still, he says that music, and specifically, the classical guitar, has been a constant for him ever since childhood.

In this episode of It Goes To 11, Drexler introduces viewers to the Spanish guitar, the most essential item in his musical tool kit. As he explains, it was made by Vicente Carrillo, a Spanish luthier who made guitars for Keith Richards and Paco de Lucía, among others.

Drexler's instrument has various siblings. some who've landed in the hands of some of the biggest stars in music. What makes Drexler's guitar truly special, he continues, is the wood it's made from.

"The cover is made of Canadian cedar, and the sides and the back are made of palo escrito. It's a type of Mexican wood," Drexler says. He then flips over his guitar to reveal the gorgeous, multi-toned panel of wood that makes up the back of the instrument.

When Drexler was first learning to play the guitar, as a ten-year-old in the mid-1970s, he had an instrument made from a similar type of wood.

"This guitar is made of Mexican wood," he explains, "and the first guitar I ever had was a guitar from Paracho, Michoacán, made with Mexican wood as well. So in a way, I'm reconnecting with the first guitar I ever had that was made with this type of wood as well."

Drexler's life has changed immeasurably since he learned his instrument: He's been nominated for five GRAMMYs and won five Latin GRAMMYs over the course of his career. In the meantime, he's only grown closer to his Spanish guitar.

"I can play it like it's a part of my body, right?" Drexler adds. "It's a beautiful instrument, and the sound is the most beautiful thing about it.

Watch the video above to see Drexler's classical guitar in action, and keep checking GRAMMY.com for more episodes of It Goes To 11.

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It Goes To 11: Scott Kirkland Unveils The Synthesizer That Helped The Crystal Method Find Its Sound
Scott Kirkland

Credit: Sam Hodges

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It Goes To 11: Scott Kirkland Unveils The Synthesizer That Helped The Crystal Method Find Its Sound

Meet the synthesizer that the Crystal Method's Scott Kirkland has used on every album in this episode of It Goes To 11.

GRAMMYs/May 18, 2022 - 05:00 pm

Over the course of the almost three decades Scott Kirkland has spent making music as the Crystal Method — which became Kirkland's solo project when former bandmate Ken Jordan departed in 2017 — he has always depended on a great synthesizer to help him create his signature sound.

In this episode of It Goes To 11, Kirkland introduces the trusty synth that has helped the Vegas-based electronic outfit form its signature sound. "It's been in the Crystal Method family for every album," he says. 

That's the Roland Jupiter-6, a piece of gear that Kirland says he originally picked up thanks to LA-based classified ads paper The Recycler — the same legendary paper that once helped bassist Duff McKagen join Guns 'n' Roses and put Nikki Sixx and Tommy Lee in touch with guitarist Mick Mars to form Motley Crue.

"There would be, like, 20 to 30 people every morning at 6 a.m. out there getting 'em, ripping 'em open to put 'em on their car," Kirkland remembers. "Some people were looking for free items, some people were looking for cars, and there was a group of us that were always looking for synthesizers. I'm sure that's how we found it."

The now-discontinued JP-6 is well-known for its ability to produce a wide array of sounds. To Kirkland, that's what makes it great. "I always love sounds that seem to be antagonizing each other," he explains, adding that it can easily create texture, sonic juxtaposition and — because the Crystal Method is not a vocal group — create sounds that are ear-catching enough to serve as a main melody.

"It feels like an old friend. Like having a conversation with an old friend. I would never get rid of this old friend. But if I ever had the opportunity to buy a new friend, I would," he jokes. "If any of you out there want to donate your Jupiter-6 to the Crystal Method, I promise you, I will give it a fantastic home."

Hear more about Kirkland's trusty synth in this episode of It Goes To 11, and check back for new episodes. 

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