searchsearch
Backstage At The 63rd GRAMMYs: Taylor Swift Reveals Her Live Guests For Performance At 2021 GRAMMY Awards Show

Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift

news

Backstage At The 63rd GRAMMYs: Taylor Swift Reveals Her Live Guests For Performance At 2021 GRAMMY Awards Show

Taylor Swift, who is up for Album Of The Year and five other categories at the 63rd GRAMMY Awards, reveals who will join her for her GRAMMYs performance on Sunday, March 14

GRAMMYs/Mar 12, 2021 - 01:48 am

After months of anticipation as to who would be performing at the 2021 GRAMMY Awards show, we finally have an answer: A litany of stars from Haim to Doja Cat to Cardi B will take the stage.

To say nothing of Taylor Swift, who had a massive 2020 with folklore and evermore.

At the 63rd GRAMMY Awards, Swift is up for Album Of The Year, Best Pop Vocal Album (folklore), Song Of The Year, Best Pop Solo Performance ("Cardigan") and Best Song Written For Visual Media ("Beautiful Ghosts" from 2019’s Cats).

In the latest episode of Backstage At The 63rd GRAMMYs, find out who will perform alongside Taylor Swift at the 2021 GRAMMY Awards show—and tune in on Sunday, March 14 to find out if she’ll win!

Backstage At The 63rd GRAMMYs: Miranda Lambert Talks The GRAMMY Awards’ Prestige During A Trying Year

 

Taylor Swift's Essential Music Videos, From "You Belong With Me" To "Anti-Hero"
Taylor Swift on the 2023 GRAMMYs red carpet.

Photo: Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

list

Taylor Swift's Essential Music Videos, From "You Belong With Me" To "Anti-Hero"

In honor of Taylor Swift's history-making Best Music Video win at the 2023 GRAMMYs for "All Too Well: The Short Film," revisit some of the superstar's most iconic videos to date.

GRAMMYs/Feb 7, 2023 - 09:05 pm

At the 2023 GRAMMYs, Taylor Swift won Best Music Video for her short film set to the 10-minute version of "All Too Well."

It's a golden gramophone the singer has won once before, nearly a decade ago for the star-studded visual to 1989 single "Bad Blood." But this win was different. As Swift collected the 12th GRAMMY of her storied career, this victory came from a video she had single-handedly directed; it also marked the first time an artist won the category for a video they directed solo. 

Delivering iconic visuals is nothing new for the superstar, either. After all, she's been doing it from her earliest days as a teenage wunderkind known for penning diaristic country-pop hits like "Tim McGraw," "Our Song," "Love Story," and "You Belong with Me." But over the years, Swift's precision in executing her singular, cinematic vision has only gotten more creative, more exact and more ambitious — and now, those talents are GRAMMY-winning.

To celebrate Swift's big GRAMMY win for "All Too Well: The Short Film," GRAMMY.com has distilled her extensive filmography down to the 11 most essential and unforgettable music videos in the Swiftian canon — from "Teardrops on My Guitar" to her latest No. 1 smash "Anti-Hero."

Check out GRAMMY.com's picks for the most iconic Taylor Swift music videos below.

"Teardrops on My Guitar" (Taylor Swift)

Although it was only her second single, the video for 2006's "Teardrops on My Guitar" contains many of the hallmarks for what would become Swift's signature visual aesthetic throughout her early career. Unrequited love interest in the form of One Tree Hill's Tyler Hilton? Check. An iridescent gown fit for a fairytale? Check. A narrative arc that establishes our girl as the underdog, who you can't help rooting for to get her happy ending? Check and check.

"You Belong With Me" (Fearless)

Is there any video more quintessential from Swift's country era than the one for "You Belong With Me"? Not only did the Fearless visual give Swifties their queen in her now-iconic "Junior Jewels" T-shirt, but it established the goofy side of Swift's personality — as yet unseen in her filmography — as well as her willingness to embody characters in her videos, like the brunette mean-girl of a cheerleader and an ultra-relatable band geek who are competing for the heart of the hunky boy next door.

"Mine" (Speak Now)

"Mine" was the lead single for Swift's third album — not to be confused with fellow Speak Now single "Ours," which led off the 2010 LP's deluxe repackaging. And though she'd dabbled in the past on videos for "I'm Only Me When I'm With You" and "The Best Day," the song marked the pop star's first true directorial effort helped along by co-director Roman White. And she was clearly taking notes that would inspire her future work during the process — just watch the scene where she and her rakish, blonde fiancé get into a screaming match in their kitchen and tell any Swiftie it doesn't look familiar…

"Everything Has Changed" feat. Ed Sheeran (Red)

This 2012 collaboration with Ed Sheeran upped the ante in Swift's videography by handing off the bulk of the storytelling to other people entirely — in this case, a pair of elementary schoolers portraying younger versions of Tay and the "Thinking Out Loud" crooner. The close friends and frequent collaborators only appear in the final moments of the video, but the kids and their adorable story would pick up nearly a decade later in the visual for the pair's 2022 duet remix of Sheeran's "The Joker and The Queen."

"Blank Space" (1989)

What does Swift do when the media paints her as a serial dater — verging on maneater — who's constantly burning her way through a revolving door of famous men? Write a smash hit about it, of course. With help from Joseph Kahn, Swift turns tabloid fodder into cinematic gold by casting herself as the unhinged nightmare dressed like a daydream, always ready to make the bad guys good for a weekend and add their names to her little black book. Too bad the poor fools won't find out until it's too late that their names are in red, underlined…

"Look What You Made Me Do" (reputation)

#TaylorSwiftIsOverParty? As if. With the release of the "Look What You Made Me Do" video, Swift officially entered her reputation era and shifted her skewed public perception off its tilted axis and back in her favor. Yes, there were snakes serving tea, bathtubs filled with diamonds, and a Taylor or two for every era that had come before. But the true feat of the glossy, karma-fueled visual was reminding the superstar's fans, doubters and haters alike that her ability to come back from the proverbial dead with a smash single in hand will always be stronger than anything thrown at her.

"The Man" (Lover)

For her solo directorial debut, Swift wanted to make both a statement and a splash. So she chose to skewer the sexism and toxic masculinity she's endured throughout her career as "The Man," cleverly dressing in drag as a rich, cocky manspreader by the name of — you guessed it — Tyler Swift. As has become custom over the years, the music video was filled with Easter eggs and cameos from famous faces like TikTok star Loren Gray, Dwayne Johnson and even her own father. The video eventually made history as well, when Swift became the first solo female to ever take home the prize for Best Director at the MTV Video Music Awards in 2020.

"cardigan" (folklore)

Filmed at the height of the pandemic, Swift proved with the video for "cardigan" that she is always capable of creating magic, even in the most challenging of circumstances. Taking cues from the fantasy and period films she had devoured during the early days of quarantine, the visual took a more fantastical turn than many of the past videos in the star's filmography. As the sole star of the show, a nightgown-clad Swift is transported to magical worlds by her trusty piano — a perfect parallel to the fictional worlds she dreamed up on folklore.

"willow" (evermore)

When evermore arrived by surprise just five months after its older sister, Swift announced that she was venturing deeper into the metaphorical woods. And with that, the music video for "willow" picks up right where "cardigan" left off. The clip doubles down on the fantasy of folklore by setting the singer on a journey filled with witchcraft, scenes straight out of a storybook, and an onscreen reunion with Taeok Lee, who last appeared as a backup dancer on the Red Tour in 2013.

"All Too Well: The Short Film" (Red (Taylor's Version))

There was really only one way to do the mystical 10-minute version of "All Too Well" justice after Swift dug it out from the vault for Red (Taylor's Version) — a short film, directed by Swift herself. Enlisting actors Dylan O'Brien and Sadie Sink as the doomed lovers at the center of the autumnal tale, Swift wrote the treatment, took charge on set, and manifested her creative vision with her most fully-realized project to date. The sweeping, 15-minute mini-movie soon inspired Swift to write and direct her first feature film, and helped the singer win the 2023 GRAMMY for Best Music Video.

"Anti-Hero" (Midnights)

"It's me, hi, I'm the problem, it's me." With that witty inner dialogue, Swift introduced Swifties to the most hilariously self-destructive version of herself. But even self-loathing looks like a blast through the superstar's point of view, whether she's outrunning ghosts dressed in whimsical '70s-style bedsheets or commiserating with her gigantic monster of a doppelgänger who just wants to be part of the gang.

The Taylor Swift Essentials: 13 Songs That Display Her Storytelling Prowess And Genre-Bouncing Genius

20 Artists Who Made History At The 2023 GRAMMYs Other Than Beyoncé: Taylor Swift, Kim Petras, Viola Davis & More
Photo of Sam Smith and Kim Petras winning the GRAMMY for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Photo: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

news

20 Artists Who Made History At The 2023 GRAMMYs Other Than Beyoncé: Taylor Swift, Kim Petras, Viola Davis & More

As Queen Bey takes her throne as the artist with the most GRAMMYs of all time, take a look at some of the other 2023 GRAMMY winners who joined her in celebrating momentous achievements.

GRAMMYs/Feb 6, 2023 - 11:09 pm

In the win heard around the world, Beyoncé became the person with the most GRAMMYs of all time at the 2023 GRAMMYs. Her win for Best Dance/Electronic Music Album for RENAISSANCE put her at 32 golden gramophones — and in host Trevor Noah's eyes, that solidified her title as the GRAMMY GOAT.

But while Beyoncé's latest GRAMMY feat is unquestionably impressive, the "BREAK MY SOUL" singer wasn't the only artist who experienced a piece of GRAMMY history at the 65th GRAMMY Awards.

There were several special moments at the Premiere Ceremony, including the first-ever GRAMMY Awards for Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical (Tobias Jesso Jr.) and Best Score Soundtrack for Video Games and Other Interactive Media ("Assassin's Creed Valhalla: Dawn Of Ragnarok"). At the Telecast, Kim Petras scored a major win for the transgender community with her Best Pop Duo/Group Performance victory, and Dr. Dre was the inaugural recipient of his namesake Dr. Dre Global Impact Award.

Below, take a look at some of the history-making feats from the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Milestone Moments

As Kim Petras and Sam Smith accepted the GRAMMY for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for their risqué collaboration, "Unholy," Smith let Petras do the talking because of a very special feat: She was the first trans woman to win in the category.

Earlier at the Premiere Ceremony, Germaine Franco became the first woman of color to win Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media, which she won for composing the Disney animated film Encanto. (Notably, Encanto swept all three of the categories for which it was nominated, also winning Best Song Written For Visual Media for "We Don't Talk About Bruno" and Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media.)

Carly Pearce and Ashley McBryde rang in a country first, as their win for Best Country Duo/Group Performance (for "Never Wanted to Be That Girl") marked the first female pairing to win the category — and the first GRAMMY win for both artists!

Notable Firsts

There were seven new awards given at the 2023 GRAMMYs, making those seven recipients the first to receive their respective honors. These were the first-time winners at the Premiere Ceremony: Tobias Jesso Jr. (Songwriter Of The Year, Non-Classical), "Assassin's Creed Valhalla: Dawn Of Ragnarok" (Best Score Soundtrack For Video Games And Other Interactive Media), Wet Leg (Best Alternative Music Performance for "Chaise Longue"), Bonnie Raitt (Best Americana Performance for "Made Up Mind") and J. Ivy (Best Spoken Word Poetry Album for The Poet Who Sat By The Door).

At the Telecast, Dr. Dre became the first recipient of the Dr. Dre Global Impact Award; shortly after, Iranian singer/songwriter Shervin Hajipour and his song "Baraye" received the first Special Merit Award for Best Song For Social Change. 

There were a few other notable firsts at the Premiere Ceremony. Taylor Swift's Best Music Video win for "All Too Well: The Short Film" was the first time an artist won the category for a video directed by the artist themselves.

When jazz favorite Robert Glasper's Black Radio III won Best R&B Album, it marked his second win in the category — and an interesting one at that. His first win came in 2013 thanks to the original album in the trilogy, Black Radio, meaning his 2023 win was the first time an album and its sequel album have won in the category. 

Elsewhere, two student groups celebrated some historic GRAMMY firsts: The Tennessee State University Marching Band became the first collegiate band to win a GRAMMY after receiving the golden gramophone for Best Roots Gospel Album, and the New York Youth Symphony became the first youth orchestra to win Best Orchestral Performance.

Exciting Rarities

Viola Davis added a GRAMMY to her ever-impressive empire, which meant she is now officially an EGOT (Emmy, GRAMMY, Oscar, Tony) winner. Her GRAMMY win for Best Audio Book, Narration, and Storytelling Recording helped her become the third Black woman to earn an EGOT, and the first to secure the status at the GRAMMY Awards, following Whoopi Goldberg and Jennifer Hudson

Bronx-born jazz singer Samara Joy was awarded the GRAMMY for Best New Artist — only the second time a jazz artist has won the award, and the first since Esperanza Spalding's win in 2011.

Jack Antonoff became the third producer to win Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical winner in consecutive years; Babyface did so in 1996 and 1997, and Greg Kurstin achieved the feat in 2016 and 2017.

Last but certainly not least, "Into The Woods" joined elite ranks by winning the GRAMMY for Best Musical Theater Album. Stephen Sondheim's 1987 original won the category in 1989, making it only the fourth Broadway show to earn two Best Musical Theater Album GRAMMYs alongside "Gypsy," "Les Miserables" and "West Side Story." It's also the second year in a row a piece of GRAMMY history was born from the category, as "The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical" creators Abigail Barlow and Emily Bear became the youngest winners in 2022.

10 Must-See Moments From The 2023 GRAMMYs: Beyoncé Makes History, Hip-Hop Receives An Epic Tribute, Bad Bunny Brings The Puerto Rican Heat


Jack Antonoff Wins Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical For The Second Year In A Row | 2023 GRAMMYs
Jack Antonoff at the 2023 GRAMMYs Premiere Ceremony.

Photo: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

news

Jack Antonoff Wins Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical For The Second Year In A Row | 2023 GRAMMYs

The reigning Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical winner, Jack Antonoff, holds his title at the 2023 GRAMMYs,

GRAMMYs/Feb 6, 2023 - 12:42 am

Jack Antonoff won the GRAMMY for Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical at the 2023 GRAMMYs, marking his second win in the category — in a row.

Even so, Antonoff remained humble as he accepted his trophy. He put the spotlight on his right-hand woman, sound engineer Laura Sisk, who joined Antonoff on stage.

"I sit in the studio all day with one person — this is Laura, who engineers and mixes the records with us," he said. "We just sit there all f—ing day. We were there yesterday, we'll be there tomorrow, and this is all completely for Laura."

Dan Auerbach, Boi-1da, Dahi, and Dernst "D'mile" Emile II were the other nominees in the category.

Listen to music from all of the nominees on our official Amazon Music playlist.

Check out the complete list of winners and nominees at the 2023 GRAMMYs.

Taylor Swift Makes GRAMMY History (Again) With Best Music Video Win For "All Too Well: The Short Film" | 2023 GRAMMYs
Taylor Swift on the 2023 GRAMMYs red carpet.

Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

news

Taylor Swift Makes GRAMMY History (Again) With Best Music Video Win For "All Too Well: The Short Film" | 2023 GRAMMYs

Taylor Swift's Best Music Video win was her first of the 2023 GRAMMYs, which also marked another GRAMMY first for the superstar.

GRAMMYs/Feb 6, 2023 - 12:08 am

Taylor Swift won the GRAMMY for Best Music Video at the 2023 GRAMMYs thanks to "All Too Well: The Short Film," becoming the first artist to win the category with a sole directing credit for their own music video.

Though Swift wasn’t there to accept the award herself, her video co-producer, Saul Germaine, delivered a short-and-sweet speech thanking Swift as well as the video's team and two stars, Sadie Sink and Dylan O’Brien. "It was an incredible honor to tell this story with you," Germaine said.

Swift is no stranger to making GRAMMY history, as she became the first female artist to win the prestigious Album Of The Year GRAMMY three times in 2021 with her win for folklore. This is also not her first win in the Best Music Video category, either, as she won the award for "Bad Blood" in 2016.

Adele, BTS, Doja Cat, Kendrick Lamar, and Harry Styles were the other nominees in the Best Music Video category this year.

Listen to music from all of the nominees on our official Amazon Music playlist.

Check out the complete list of winners and nominees at the 2023 GRAMMYs.