Winners

41st Annual GRAMMY Awards (1998)

“There are so many women nominated this year, Fox is backstage filming their own TV special — ‘When Divas Attack,’” host Rosie O’Donnell joked early in her first appearance as a GRAMMY host. In truth, this GRAMMY night at the Shrine Auditorium would turn out to be a big night for female artists. Most notably, Lauryn Hill won five GRAMMY awards — Album Of The Year (a first for any hip-hop artist), Best New Artist, Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, Best Rhythm & Blues Song and Best R&B Album — and delivered a stunning version of “To Zion” (with a little help from Carlos Santana) from The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill.

Hill had plenty of female company at the top of the world. Coming off a Titanic smash, Celine Dion won Record Of The Year and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for “My Heart Will Go On,” which was also honored as Song Of The Year for songwriters Will Jennings and James Horner. And Madonna — who won three awards herself during the night — opened the televised festivities with her first GRAMMY performance, singing “Nothing Really Matters” from her acclaimed Ray Of Light album with a decidedly Asian look.

O’Donnell followed suit, entering along with two sushi chefs who eventually revealed themselves to have written “Soy” and “Sauce” on their chests — a sly reference to the previous year’s Soy Bomb disturbance. O’Donnell then introduced Alanis Morissette’s performance of “Uninvited” from the City of Angels soundtrack — which won Best Female Rock Vocal Performance and Best Rock Song — by saying, “Some of us take our broken, obsessive relationships to therapy, she’s taken hers to number one.”

Other standout performances by women included a rocking performance of “There Goes The Neighborhood” by Sheryl Crow, whose The Globe Sessions then took home the award for Best Rock Album. Country diva Shania Twain — who won two awards — made a vivid impression in an ultra-sexy black outfit that didn’t exactly conjure up images of the Grand Ole Opry. It was the Dixie Chicks, however, who received the award for Best Country Album for Wide Open Spaces, a fact that seemed to totally surprise them. “We thought for sure Shania got it,” Dixie Chick Martie Maguire explained. “We’re freaking out.”

For the record, there were men on the show too. In fact, for many, the 41st Annual GRAMMY Awards will be remembered as the night that Ricky Martin became a star in any language with a completely winning performance of “The Cup Of Life.” O’Donnell jokingly translated the title as “I Survived Menudo” before Martin’s performance, but spoke for millions afterwards when she sang his praises. Moments later he won the award for Best Latin Pop Performance for “Vuelve.”

Aerosmith — winner of Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal for “Pink” — performed their Armageddon soundtrack smash ballad “I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing.” Director George Lucas introduced a segment on the power of film music that featured James Horner and John Williams conducting selections from the scores to Titanic and Star Wars, respectively. A year after his last-minute cancellation and replacement by Aretha Franklin, Luciano Pavarotti returned to offer his “Nessun Dorma” from Puccini’s opera Turandot. And Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner brought the Shrine audience to their feet when they prevailed over Jerry Seinfeld, Steve Martin, Jeff Foxworthy and the Firesign Theatre to win Best Spoken Comedy Album for The 2000 Year Old Man In The Year 2000. Of their fellow nominees, Brooks praised them as, “All good — not as good as us, but all good.” Carl Reiner then explained, “Thirty-nine years ago we were nominated for [a] GRAMMY and didn’t win. We can’t wait another 39 years — they can.”

Yet it was Will Smith who might have provided the biggest laugh of the GRAMMY night. Accepting the award for Best Rap Solo Performance for “Gettin’ Jiggy Wit It,” Smith explained that he had been to his first parent-teacher meeting earlier in the day, and that the teacher expressed pleasure with his young son Trey’s progress...except for his rhyming skills. “That’s just pure parental neglect,” Smith joked. “So I want to dedicate this award to my son Trey. And Trey, there’s always law school, baby.” 

Record Of The Year
 
winner
My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme From Titanic)

Celine Dion, artist. David Gleeson, Humberto Gatica & Simon Franglen, engineers/mixers. James Horner, Simon Franglen & Walter Afanasieff, producers.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill

Lauryn Hill, artist. Chris Theis, Comissioner Gordon, Johnny Wydrycz, Ken Johnston, Matt Howe, Storm Jefferson, Tony Prendatt & Warren Riker, engineers/mixers. Lauryn Hill, producer.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme From Titanic)

James Horner & Will Jennings, songwriters.

Best New Artist
 
winner
Lauryn Hill
Best Female Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme From Titanic)

Celine Dion, artist.

Best Male Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Eric Clapton, GRAMMY winner
My Father's Eyes

Eric Clapton, artist.

Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Jump Jive An' Wail

Brian Setzer, artist.

Best Pop Collaboration With Vocals
 
winner
I Still Have That Other Girl

Burt Bacharach & Elvis Costello, artists.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Sleepwalk

Brian Setzer, artist.

Best Dance Recording
 
winner
Madonna, GRAMMY winner
Ray Of Light

Madonna, artist. Pat McCarthy, mixer. Madonna & William Orbit, producers.

Best Pop Album
 
winner
Madonna, GRAMMY winner
Ray Of Light

Madonna, artist. David Reitzas, Jon Ingoldsby & Pat McCarthy, engineers/mixers. Madonna & William Orbit, producers.

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Live At Carnegie Hall - The 50th Anniversary Concert

Patti Page, artist.

Best Female Rock Vocal Performance
 
winner
Uninvited

Alanis Morissette, artist.

Best Male Rock Vocal Performance
 
winner
Fly Away

Lenny Kravitz, artist.

Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Pink

Aerosmith (Tom Hamilton, Joey Kramer, Joe Perry, Steven Tyler, Brad Whitford), artist.

Best Hard Rock Performance
 
winner
Most High

Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, artists.

Best Metal Performance
 
winner
Metallica, GRAMMY winners
Better Than You

Metallica (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Jason Newsted, Lars Ulrich), artist.

Best Rock Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Pat Metheny, GRAMMY winner
The Roots Of Coincidence

Pat Metheny Group (Lyle Mays, Pat Metheny, Steve Rodby, Paul Wertico), artist.

Best Rock Song
 
winner
Uninvited

Alanis Morissette, songwriter.

Best Rock Album
 
winner
The Globe Sessions

Sheryl Crow, artist. Tchad Blake & Trina Shoemaker, engineers/mixers. Sheryl Crow, producer.

Best Alternative Music Performance
 
winner
Hello Nasty

Beastie Boys (Mike Diamond, Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch), artist.

Best Female R&B Vocal Performance
 
winner
Doo Wop (That Thing)

Lauryn Hill, artist.

Best Male R&B Vocal Performance
 
winner
Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
St. Louis Blues

Stevie Wonder, artist.

Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
The Boy Is Mine

Brandy & Monica, artists.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Doo Wop (That Thing)

Lauryn Hill, songwriter.

Best R&B Album
 
winner
The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill

Lauryn Hill, artist. Comissioner Gordon & Tony Prendatt, engineers/mixers. Lauryn Hill, producer.

Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance
 
winner
Live! - One Night Only

Patti LaBelle, artist.

Best Rap Solo Performance
 
winner
Gettin' Jiggy Wit It

Will Smith, artist.

Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or Group
 
winner
Intergalactic

Beastie Boys (Mike Diamond, Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch), artist.

Best Rap Album
 
winner
Jay Z, GRAMMY winner
Vol. 2...Hard Knock Life

Jay-Z, artist. Joe Quinde, engineer/mixer.

Best Female Country Vocal Performance
 
winner
You're Still The One

Shania Twain, artist.

Best Male Country Vocal Performance
 
winner
Vince Gill
If You Ever Have Forever In Mind

Vince Gill, artist.

Best Country Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Dixie Chicks, GRAMMY winners
There's Your Trouble

Dixie Chicks (Emily Erwin, Natalie Maines, Martie Seidel), artist.

Best Country Collaboration With Vocals
 
winner
Alison Krauss, GRAMMY winner, Emmylou Harris, GRAMMY winner
Same Old Train

Alison Krauss, Clint Black, Dwight Yoakam, Earl Scruggs, Emmylou Harris, Joe Diffie, Marty Stuart, Merle Haggard, Pam Tillis, Patty Loveless, Randy Travis, Ricky Skaggs & Travis Tritt, artists.

Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Vince Gill
A Soldier's Joy

Randy Scruggs & Vince Gill, artists.

Best Country Song
 
winner
You're Still The One

Robert John "Mutt" Lange & Shania Twain, songwriters.

Best Country Album
 
winner
Dixie Chicks, GRAMMY winners
Wide Open Spaces

Dixie Chicks (Emily Erwin, Natalie Maines, Martie Seidel), artist. Eric Legg & John Guess, engineers/mixers. Blake Chancey & Paul Worley, producers.

Best Bluegrass Album
 
winner
Bluegrass Rules!

Ricky Skaggs And Kentucky Thunder (Paul Brewster, Mark Fain, Bobby Hicks, Dennis Parker, Marc Pruett, Ricky Skaggs, Bryan Sutton), artist.

Best New Age Album
 
winner
Landmarks

Clannad (Ciaran Brennan, Maire Brennan, Noel Duggan, Padraig Duggan), artist.

Best Contemporary Jazz Performance
 
winner
Pat Metheny, GRAMMY winner
Imaginary Day

Pat Metheny Group (Lyle Mays, Pat Metheny, Steve Rodby, Paul Wertico), artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance
 
winner
I Remember Miles

Shirley Horn, artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Solo
 
winner
Chick Corea, GRAMMY winner
Rhumbata

Chick Corea & Gary Burton, soloists.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Individual Or Group
 
winner
Herbie Hancock, GRAMMY winner
Gershwin's World

Herbie Hancock, artist.

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Performance
 
winner
Count Plays Duke

Grover Mitchell, artist.

Best Latin Jazz Performance
 
winner
Hot House

Arturo Sandoval, artist.

Best Rock Gospel Album
 
winner
You Are There

Ashley Cleveland, artist.

Best Pop/Contemporary Gospel Album
 
winner
This Is My Song

Deniece Williams, artist.

Best Southern, Country, Or Bluegrass Gospel Album
 
winner
The Apostle - Soundtrack

John Huie, Ken Levitan & Peter Afterman, producers.

Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album
 
winner
He Leadeth Me

Cissy Houston, artist.

Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album
 
winner
The Nu Nation Project

Kirk Franklin, artist.

Best Gospel Choir Or Chorus Album
 
winner
Reflections

O'Landa Draper, choir director.

Best Latin Pop Performance
 
winner
Vuelve

Ricky Martin, artist.

Best Latin Rock/Alternative Performance
 
winner
Sueños Liquidos

Maná (Juan Calleros, Alex Gonzalez, Fher Olvera, Sergio Vallin), artist.

Best Tropical Latin Performance
 
winner
Contra La Corriente

Marc Anthony, artist.

Best Mexican-American Music Performance
 
winner
Los Super Seven

Los Super Seven (Joe Ely, Freddy Fender, David Hidalgo, Flaco Jimenez, Ruben Ramos, Cesar Rosas, Rick Trevino), artist.

Best Tejano Music Performance
 
winner
Said And Done

Flaco Jimenez, artist.

Best Traditional Blues Album
 
winner
Any Place I'm Going

Otis Rush, artist.

Best Contemporary Blues Album
 
winner
Slow Down

Keb' Mo', artist.

Best Traditional Folk Album
 
winner
Long Journey Home

Chieftains (Derek Bell, Kevin Conneff, Martin Fay, Sean Keane, Matt Molloy, Paddy Moloney), artist.

Best Contemporary Folk Album
 
winner
Car Wheels On A Gravel Road

Lucinda Williams, artist.

Best Reggae Album
 
winner
Friends

Sly & Robbie (Sly Dunbar, Robbie Shakespeare), artist.

Best World Music Album
 
winner
Quanta Live

Gilberto Gil, artist.

Best Polka Album
 
winner
Dance With Me

Jimmy Sturr, artist.

Best Musical Album For Children
 
winner
Elmopalooza!

John Boylan, producer.

Best Spoken Word Album For Children
 
winner
The Children's Shakespeare

Dan Musselman & Stefan Rudnicki, producers.

Best Spoken Word Album
 
winner
Still Me

Christopher Reeve, narrator.

Best Spoken Comedy Album
 
winner
The 2000 Year Old Man In The Year 2000

Carl Reiner & Mel Brooks, artists.

Best Musical Show Album
 
winner
The Lion King

Mark Mancina, producer.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
Béla Fleck
Almost 12

Béla Fleck, Future Man & Victor Lemonte Wooten, composers.

Best Instrumental Composition Written For A Motion Picture Or For Television
 
winner
John Williams, GRAMMY winner
Saving Private Ryan

John Williams, composer.

Best Song Written For A Motion Picture Or For Television
 
winner
My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme From Titanic)

James Horner & Will Jennings, songwriters.

Best Instrumental Arrangement
 
winner
Waltz For Debby

Don Sebesky, arranger.

Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s)
 
winner
Herbie Hancock, GRAMMY winner, Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
St. Louis Blues

Herbie Hancock, Robert Sadin & Stevie Wonder, arrangers.

Best Recording Package
 
winner
Ray Of Light

Kevin Reagan, art director.

Best Boxed Recording Package
 
winner
The Complete Hank Williams

Jim Kemp & Virginia Team, art directors.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Miles Davis Quintet 1965-1968

Bob Belden, Michael Cuscuna & Todd Coolman, album notes writers.

Best Historical Album
 
winner
The Complete Hank Williams

Colin Escott, Kira Florita & Kyle Young, compilation producers. Joseph M. Palmaccio & Tom Ruff, mastering engineers.

Best Engineered Album - Non-Classical
 
winner
The Globe Sessions

Andy Wallace, Tchad Blake & Trina Shoemaker, engineers.

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical
 
winner
Rob Cavallo
Remixer Of The Year, Non-classical
 
winner

David Morales, remixer.

Best Engineered Album, Classical
 
winner
Barber: Prayers Of Kierkegaard/Vaughan Williams: Dona Nobis Pacem/Bartok: Cantata Profana

Jack Renner, engineer.

Producer Of The Year, Classical
 
winner
Steven Epstein
Best Classical Album
 
winner
Barber: Prayers Of Kierkegaard/Vaughan Williams: Dona Nobis Pacem/Bartok: Cantata Profana

Robert Shaw, artist. James Mallinson, producer.

Best Orchestral Performance
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Mahler: Symphony No. 9

Pierre Boulez, conductor.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Bartók: Bluebeard's Castle

Jessye Norman & Laszlo Polgar, artists. Pierre Boulez, conductor. Karl-August Naegler, producer.

Best Choral Performance
 
winner
Barber: Prayers Of Kierkegaard/Vaughan Williams: Dona Nobis Pacem/Bartok: Cantata Profana

Robert Shaw, conductor.

Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Penderecki: Violin Concerto No. 2 "Metamorphosen"

Anne-Sophie Mutter, artist. Krzysztof Penderecki, conductor.

Best Instrumental Soloist Performance (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
Bach: English Suites Nos. 1, 3 & 6

Murray Perahia, artist.

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
André Previn
American Scenes - Works Of Copland, Previn, Barber & Gershwin

André Previn & Gil Shaham, artists.

Best Small Ensemble Performance (With Or Without Conductor)
 
winner
Reich: Music For 18 Musicians

Steve Reich, artist.

Best Classical Vocal Performance
 
winner
The Beautiful Voice - Works Of Charpentier, Gounod, Massenet & Flotow

Renee Fleming, artist.

Best Classical Contemporary Composition
 
winner
Penderecki: Violin Concerto No. 2 "Metamorphosen"

Krzysztof Penderecki, composer.

Best Classical Crossover Album
 
winner
Yo-Yo Ma
Soul Of The Tango - The Music Of Astor Piazzolla

Jorge Calandrelli & Yo-Yo Ma, artists.

Best Short Form Music Video
 
winner
Madonna, GRAMMY winner
Ray Of Light

Madonna, artist. Jonas Akerlund, video director. Billy Poveda & Nicola Doring, video producers.

Best Long Form Music Video
 
winner
American Masters - Lou Reed: Rock And Roll Heart

Lou Reed, artist. Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, video director. Karen Bernstein, Susan Lacy, Tamar Hacker & Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, video producers.