Winners

37th Annual GRAMMY Awards (1994)

The 37th Annual GRAMMY Awards struck a powerful and somber first note with Bruce Springsteen offering a no-frills performance of “Streets Of Philadelphia” that was true to the drama of the song itself. Written for Jonathan Demme’s film Philadelphia, the song was a sensitive and moving statement about the ravages of AIDS. By the end of this night, “Streets Of Philadelphia” would be named Song Of The Year, Best Rock Song, Best Male Rock Vocal Performance and Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television.

Springsteen handled his big night with characteristic grace and charm. “I’d like to thank all those disparaged and mysterious GRAMMY voters out there, wherever you are and whoever you are,” he said as he accepted the Song Of The Year award from George Michael and Annie Lennox, who was wearing Mickey Mouse ears. The Boss also expressed his appreciation to “the folks who’ve come up to me in restaurants and on the street who’ve lost their sons or their lovers or their friends to AIDS and said the song meant something to them.” Indeed, there were many AIDS-awareness red ribbons to be seen on the GRAMMYs this year.

Yet on this night there was also considerable levity and, lest we forget, much music. Host Paul Reiser pointed out, “We’re here to celebrate. We never go the other way. We never penalize. We never find somebody who took a good song and ruined it and drag him onstage to yell at him.”

Among those with particular reason to celebrate the 37th Annual GRAMMY Awards were Sheryl Crow who took home not just the GRAMMY Award for Best New Artist, but also Record Of The Year and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for “All I Wanna Do.” Other important new voices were also recognized: After Henry Rollins successfully performed punk in a tuxedo, Soundgarden won Best Metal Performance for “Spoonman.” Women dominated the rap field, with Queen Latifah taking home the Best Rap Solo Performance award for “U.N.I.T.Y.,” and Salt-N-Pepa presented with the Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or A Group following a standout performance of “What A Man” and “None Of Your Business.” Future GRAMMY favorites Green Day received the Best Alternative Rock Performance award for their breakthrough album Dookie.

But in the end, the big Album Of The Year award went to one of the longest-standing and classiest acts in popular music history — Tony Bennett for his MTV Unplugged Album. Bennett seemed utterly thrilled with the recognition. “I don’t believe this,” said the excited vocal great. “This is the greatest moment in my whole musical career and the greatest moment [of] my whole life. There are no words. It’s such a victorious feeling to sing good American music and have this happen.”

Recording Academy President Michael Greene made a particularly impassioned state of the arts speech. “We are here tonight on the brink of becoming the only industrialized nation in the world with absolutely no federal support for the arts,” Greene said, sounding a warning. “We must not allow the arts to be politicized, privatized, commercialized, sanitized, neutralized or zeroed out.”

Among the others honored on this night was the man who brought the GRAMMYs to live television, and television to the GRAMMYs — Executive Producer Pierre Cossette, recognized for a quarter-century of dedicated service. Cossette’s comments were brief. “My biggest job on this show every year is to keep it moving,” he said, letting his GRAMMY team do just that.

Record Of The Year
 
winner
All I Wanna Do

Sheryl Crow, artist. Bill Bottrell, producer.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
Tony Bennett, GRAMMY winner
MTV Unplugged

Tony Bennett, artist. David Kahne, producer.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Bruce Springsteen, GRAMMY winner
Streets Of Philadelphia

Bruce Springsteen, songwriter.

Best New Artist
 
winner
Sheryl Crow
Best Female Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
All I Wanna Do

Sheryl Crow, artist.

Best Male Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Elton John, GRAMMY winner
Can You Feel The Love Tonight

Elton John, artist.

Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
I Swear

All-4-One (Tony Borowiak, Delious, Jamie Jones, Alfred Nevarez), artist.

Best Pop Vocal Collaboration
 
winner
Funny How Time Slips Away

Al Green & Lyle Lovett, artists.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Cruisin'

Booker T And The MG's (Steve Cropper, Donald "Duck" Dunn), artist.

Best Pop Album
 
winner
Longing In Their Hearts

Bonnie Raitt, artist.

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Tony Bennett, GRAMMY winner
MTV Unplugged

Tony Bennett, artist.

Best Female Rock Vocal Performance
 
winner
Come To My Window

Melissa Etheridge, artist.

Best Male Rock Vocal Performance
 
winner
Bruce Springsteen, GRAMMY winner
Streets Of Philadelphia
Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Aerosmith, GRAMMY winners
Crazy

Aerosmith (Tom Hamilton, Joey Kramer, Joe Perry, Steven Tyler, Brad Whitford), artist.

Best Hard Rock Performance
 
winner
Black Hole Sun

Soundgarden (Matt Cameron, Chris Cornell, Ben Shepherd, Kim Thayil), artist.

Best Metal Performance
 
winner
Spoonman

Soundgarden (Matt Cameron, Chris Cornell, Ben Shepherd, Kim Thayil), artist.

Best Rock Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Marooned

Pink Floyd (David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Rick Wright), artist.

Best Rock Song
 
winner
Bruce Springsteen, GRAMMY winner
Streets Of Philadelphia

Bruce Springsteen, songwriter.

Best Rock Album
 
winner
The Rolling Stones, GRAMMY winners
Voodoo Lounge

Rolling Stones (Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ron Wood), artist.

Best Alternative Music Performance
 
winner
Green Day, GRAMMY winners
Dookie

Green Day (Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt, Frank Edwin Wright III), artist.

Best Female R&B Vocal Performance
 
winner
Breathe Again

Toni Braxton, artist.

Best Male R&B Vocal Performance
 
winner
Babyface, GRAMMY winner
When Can I See You

Babyface, artist.

Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
I'll Make Love To You

Boyz II Men (Michael McCary, Nathan Morris, Wanya Morris, Shawn Stockman), artist.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Babyface, GRAMMY winner
I'll Make Love To You

Babyface, songwriter.

Best R&B Album
 
winner
II

Boyz II Men (Michael McCary, Nathan Morris, Wanya Morris, Shawn Stockman), artist.

Best Rap Solo Performance
 
winner
U.N.I.T.Y.

Queen Latifah, artist.

Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or Group
 
winner
None Of Your Business

Salt-N-Pepa (Sandra "Pepa" Denton, Cheryl "Salt" James, De De (Deidra) "Spinderella" Roper), artist.

Best Female Country Vocal Performance
 
winner
Shut Up And Kiss Me

Mary Chapin Carpenter, artist.

Best Male Country Vocal Performance
 
winner
Vince Gill, GRAMMY winner
When Love Finds You

Vince Gill, artist.

Best Country Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Blues For Dixie

Asleep At The Wheel (Tim Alexander, Tommy Beavers, Ray Benson, Cindy Cashdollar, Michael Francis, David Miller, Ricky Turpin) & Lyle Lovett, artists.

Best Country Vocal Collaboration
 
winner
I Fall To Pieces

Aaron Neville & Trisha Yearwood, artists.

Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Young Thing

Chet Atkins, artist.

Best Country Song
 
winner
I Swear

Frank J. Myers & Gary Baker, songwriters.

Best Country Album
 
winner
Stones In The Road

Mary Chapin Carpenter, artist.

Best Bluegrass Album
 
winner
The Great Dobro Sessions

Jerry Douglas & Tut Taylor, producers.

Best New Age Album
 
winner
Prayer For The Wild Things

Paul Winter, artist.

Best Contemporary Jazz Performance
 
winner
Out Of The Loop

Brecker Brothers (Michael Brecker, Randy Brecker), artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance
 
winner
Mystery Lady - Songs Of Billie Holiday

Etta James, artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Solo
 
winner
Prelude To A Kiss

Benny Carter, soloist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Individual Or Group
 
winner
Herbie Hancock, GRAMMY winner
A Tribute To Miles

Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, Tony Williams, Wallace Roney & Wayne Shorter, artists.

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Performance
 
winner
Journey

McCoy Tyner, artist.

Best Latin Jazz Performance
 
winner
Danzon

Arturo Sandoval, artist.

Best Rock Gospel Album
 
winner
Wake-Up Call

Petra (Ronny Cates, Bob Hartman, John Lawry, John Schlitt, Louie Weaver), artist.

Best Pop/Contemporary Gospel Album
 
winner
Mercy

Andrae Crouch, artist.

Best Southern Gospel, Country Gospel Or Bluegrass Gospel Album
 
winner
Alison Krauss, GRAMMY winner
I Know Who Holds Tomorrow

Alison Krauss & Cox Family (Evelyn Cox, Lynn Cox, Sidney Cox, Suzanne Cox, Willard Cox), artists.

Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album
 
winner
Songs Of The Church - Live In Memphis

Albertina Walker, artist.

Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album
 
winner
Join The Band

Take 6 (Alvin Chea, Cedric Dent, Joel Kibble, Mark Kibble, Claude V. McKnight III, David Thomas), artist.

Best Gospel Album By A Choir Or Chorus
 
winner
Live In Atlanta At Morehouse College

The Love Fellowship Crusade Choir, Hezekiah Walker, choir director. (TIE)

winner
Through God's Eyes

Thompson Community Singers, Milton Brunson, choir director. (TIE)

Best Latin Pop Performance
 
winner
Segundo Romance

Luis Miguel, artist.

Best Tropical Latin Performance
 
winner
Master Sessions Volume 1

Israel López, artist.

Best Mexican-American Performance
 
winner
Recuerdo A Javier Solis

Vikki Carr, artist.

Best Traditional Blues Album
 
winner
Eric Clapton, GRAMMY winner
From The Cradle

Eric Clapton, artist.

Best Contemporary Blues Album
 
winner
Father Father

Pops Staples, artist.

Best Traditional Folk Album
 
winner
Bob Dylan, GRAMMY winner
World Gone Wrong

Bob Dylan, artist.

Best Contemporary Folk Album
 
winner
American Recordings

Johnny Cash, artist.

Best Reggae Album
 
winner
Crucial! Roots Classics

Bunny Wailer, artist.

Best World Music Album
 
winner
Talking Timbuktu

Ali Farka Toure & Ry Cooder, artists.

Best Polka Album
 
winner
Music And Friends

Walter Ostanek, artist.

Best Musical Album For Children
 
winner
The Lion King - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Chris Thomas, Hans Zimmer, Jay Rifkin & Mark Mancina, producers.

Best Spoken Word Album For Children
 
winner
The Lion King Read-Along

Robert Guillaume, narrator. Randy Thornton & Ted Kryczko, producers.

Best Spoken Word Or Non-Musical Album
 
winner
Get In The Van - On The Road With Black Flag

Henry Rollins, narrator.

Best Spoken Comedy Album
 
winner
Live From Hell

Sam Kinison, artist.

Best Musical Show Album
 
winner
Passion

Stephen Sondheim, composer. Stephen Sondheim, lyricist. Phil Ramone, producer.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
African Skies

Michael Brecker, composer.

Best Instrumental Composition Written For A Motion Picture Or For Television
 
winner
John Williams, GRAMMY winner
Schindler's List

John Williams, composer.

Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television
 
winner
Bruce Springsteen, GRAMMY winner
Streets Of Philadelphia (From Philadelphia)

Bruce Springsteen, songwriter.

Best Instrumental Arrangement
 
winner
Three Cowboy Songs

Dave Grusin, arranger.

Best Instrumental Arrangement With Accompanying Vocals
 
winner
Circle Of Life

Hans Zimmer & Lebo Morake, arrangers.

Best Recording Package
 
winner
Tribute To The Music Of Bob Wills & The Texas Playboys

Buddy Jackson, art director.

Best Recording Package - Boxed
 
winner
The Complete Ella Fitzgerald Songbooks

Chris Thompson, art director.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Louis Armstrong - Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man 1923-1934

Dan Morgenstern & Loren Schoenberg, album notes writers.

Best Historical Album
 
winner
The Complete Ella Fitzgerald Song Books On Verve

Michael Lang, compilation producer.

Best Engineered Album - Non-Classical
 
winner
Longing In Their Hearts

Ed Cherney, engineer.

Producer Of The Year
 
Best Classical Engineered Recording
 
winner
Copland: Music For Films (The Red Pony, Our Town, Etc.)

William Hoekstra, engineer.

Classical Producer Of The Year
 
winner
Andrew Cornall
Best Classical Album
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Bartók: Concerto For Orchestra; Four Orchestral Pieces, Op. 12

Pierre Boulez, artist. Karl-August Naegler, producer.

Best Orchestral Performance
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Bartók: Concerto For Orchestra: Four Orchestral Pieces, Op. 12

Pierre Boulez, conductor.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Floyd: Susannah

Cheryl Studer, Jerry Hadley, Kenn Chester & Samuel Ramey, artists. Kent Nagano, conductor. Martin Sauer, producer.

Best Choral Performance
 
winner
Berlioz: Messe Solennelle

John Eliot Gardiner, choir director.

Best Instrumental Soloist Performance (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Yo-Yo Ma, GRAMMY winner
The New York Album - Works Of Albert, Bartok & Bloch

Yo-Yo Ma, artist.

Best Instrumental Soloist Performance Without Orchestra
 
winner
Haydn: Piano Sonatas, Nos. 32, 47, 53, 59

Emanuel Ax, artist.

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Beethoven/Mozart: Quintets (Chicago-Berlin)

Dale Clevenger, Daniel Barenboim, Daniele Damiano, Hansjorg Schellenberger & Larry Combs, artists.

Best Classical Vocal Performance
 
winner
The Impatient Lover - Italian Songs By Beethoven, Schubert, Mozart

Cecilia Bartoli, artist.

Best Classical Contemporary Composition
 
winner
Albert: Cello Concerto

Stephen Albert, composer.

Best Music Video, Short Form
 
winner
The Rolling Stones, GRAMMY winners
Love Is Strong

Rolling Stones (Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ron Wood), artist. David Fincher, video director. Cean Chaffin, video producer.

Best Music Video, Long Form
 
winner
U2, GRAMMY winners
Zoo TV - Live From Sydney

U2 (Bono, Adam Clayton, Edge, Larry Mullen Jr.), artist. David Mallet, video director. Ned O'Hanlon & Rocky Oldham, video producers.