Winners

25th Annual GRAMMY Awards (1982)

To celebrate GRAMMY’s first quarter century, the 25th Annual GRAMMY Awards featured all the excitement of a big anniversary celebration...and Toto, too.

Toto — a musically accomplished group of top Los Angeles session musicians that received relatively little credit from the major rock press of the day — got some GRAMMY love this year, winning not only Record Of The Year for their smash “Rosanna,” but also Album Of The Year for Toto IV, as well as GRAMMYs for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocals to Jerry Hey and the group’s David Paich and Jeff Porcaro, and Best Vocal Arrangement For Two Or More Voices to David Paich, both for the track “Rosanna.” And in a surprisingly rare GRAMMY call out for a nay-saying rock critic, Paich got a laugh from the crowd by sarcastically acknowledging from the stage, “We’d like to thank Robert Hilburn for believing in us,” when in fact the longtime Los Angeles Times rock critic had done absolutely nothing of the sort.

Still, the 25th Annual GRAMMY Awards were for the most part an appropriately positive affair. “This is a milestone in the life of the GRAMMY Awards, and a celebration is definitely in order and in store,” host John Denver explained, adding that “some of GRAMMY’s greatest moments” from the past would be replayed throughout the night. Some new history was made on this GRAMMY night with an altogether remarkable live performance organized by then new GRAMMY producer Ken Ehrlich that featured Ray Charles, Count Basie, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard running through some of their greatest hits at four pianos — a true musical Fab Four for the ages. The ensemble started with Charles’ “What’d I Say,” then worked through Basie’s “One O’Clock Jump,” Lewis’ “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On,” Little Richard’s gospel-fueled “Joy, Joy, Joy,” and Charles’ “Wish You Were Here Tonight,” before reprising “What’d I Say.”

The second performance of the night found Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes dueting on “Up Where We Belong,” their smash hit from the film An Officer And A Gentleman. This was a duet with a little GRAMMY history itself. Warnes had performed way back on the 11th Annual GRAMMY Awards’ “The Best On Record” broadcast as part of the Los Angeles company of Hair, while Cocker’s performance with the Crusaders at the 24th Annual GRAMMY Awards had helped inspire director Taylor Hackford to choose Cocker to sing “Up Where We Belong.” Cocker and Warnes would then win the GRAMMY for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal.

After some intelligent musical history offered by Recording Academy Chairman/President Bill Ivey, guitar pioneer Les Paul was presented with a Trustees Award. “I’m sorry that Mary isn’t here to accept this with me,” Paul said of his late great partner Mary Ford. “And I want to thank all the people that are watching on their radios.”

Les Paul wasn’t the only one getting in a good line. Eddie Murphy — who was all the rage on “Saturday Night Live” in 1982, the same year that would see his big-screen breakthrough in 48 Hrs. — had some stand-up fun speaking about the tension of being nominated for a GRAMMY. “You know what’s funny about this?” Murphy told the crowd. “A lot of people gonna lose tonight — and you got your tuxedos on and you’re losing and it’s funny.” Murphy then pretended to not know that he himself had in fact lost Best Comedy Recording to Richard Pryor during the pre-telecast, and declared, “See, I ain’t leaving here without a GRAMMY.” Later, when Lionel Richie won the GRAMMY for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male, for his early solo hit “Truly,” Murphy got a standing ovation for crashing the stage and temporarily relieving the former Commodore of his glittering prize. “Who was that masked man?” Richie joked. For the record, Murphy did in fact give the GRAMMY back.

At a quarter century, the GRAMMY Awards inevitably reflected popular music in the early ’80s as MTV was just beginning to make its impact. The Best New Artist GRAMMY, for instance, went to early MTV favorites Men At Work, while the other nominees included early video stars the Stray Cats, Human League and Asia, as well as Jennifer Holliday who became a star from the original Broadway recording of Dreamgirls. Yet there was also a deep sense of history throughout the night, including a stunning R&B segment that featured an excellent run of performances from Harvey & The Moonglows, Gladys Knight & The Pips, the Spinners and, finally, Marvin Gaye who marked what would be his tragically short-lived comeback with a rousing and, yes, arousing rendition of “Sexual Healing” — for which he won two GRAMMYs.

In a rare serious moment onstage, Eddie Murphy summed up the night and the state of the GRAMMYs at 25. “You guys are not like doctors or nothing like that,” he said, “but you’re real important to people’s lives because you give people’s lives atmosphere…I thank you for being what you are and keep kicking butt in the ’80s.” As Murphy said this, GRAMMY director Walter C. Miller cut wonderfully to a sprightly Ella Fitzgerald clapping along enthusiastically.

Record Of The Year
 
winner
Rosanna

Toto (Bobby Kimbal, Steve Lukather, David Paich, Jeff Porcaro, Michael Porcaro, Steve Porcaro), artist. Toto (Bobby Kimbal, Steve Lukather, David Paich, Jeff Porcaro, Michael Porcaro, Steve Porcaro), producer.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
Toto IV

Toto (Bobby Kimbal, Steve Lukather, David Paich, Jeff Porcaro, Michael Porcaro, Steve Porcaro), artist. Toto (Bobby Kimbal, Steve Lukather, David Paich, Jeff Porcaro, Michael Porcaro, Steve Porcaro), producer.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Always On My Mind

Johnny Christopher, Mark James & Wayne Carson, songwriters.

Best New Artist
 
winner
Men At Work
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
You Should Hear How She Talks About You

Melissa Manchester, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Truly

Lionel Richie, artist.

Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Up Where We Belong

Jennifer Warnes & Joe Cocker, artists.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Chariots Of Fire Theme (Dance Version)

Ernie Watts, artist.

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Shadows Of The Night

Pat Benatar, artist.

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Hurts So Good

John Cougar Mellencamp, artist.

Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Eye Of The Tiger

Survivor (Dave Bickler, Marc Droubay, Stephan Ellis, Jim Peterik, Frank Sullivan), artist.

Best Rock Instrumental Performance
 
winner
D.N.A.

Flock Of Seagulls (Frank Maudsley, Paul Reynolds, Ali Score, Mike Score), artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going

Jennifer Holliday, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Sexual Healing

Marvin Gaye, artist.

Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Let It Whip

Dazz Band (Steve Cox, Pierre De Mudd, Eric Fearman, Keith Harrison, Rob Harris, Skip Martin, Kenny Pettus, Ike Wiley Jr., Michael Wiley), artist. (TIE)

winner
Wanna Be With You

Earth, Wind & Fire (Philip Bailey, Larry Dunn, Johnny Graham, Ralph Johnson, Al McKay, Fred White, Maurice White, Verdine White, Andrew Woolfolk), artist. (TIE)

Best R&B Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Sexual Healing (Instrumental Version)

Marvin Gaye, artist.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Turn Your Love Around

Bill Champlin, Jay Graydon & Steve Lukather, songwriters.

Best Jazz Fusion Performance, Vocal Or Instrumental
 
winner
Pat Metheny, GRAMMY winner
Offramp

Pat Metheny, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Break It To Me Gently

Juice Newton, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Willie Nelson, GRAMMY winner
Always On My Mind

Willie Nelson, artist.

Best Country Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Mountain Music

Alabama (Jeff Cook, Teddy Gentry, Mark Herndon, Randy Owen), artist.

Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Alabama Jubilee

Roy Clark, artist.

Best Country Song
 
winner
Always On My Mind

Johnny Christopher, Mark James & Wayne Carson, songwriters.

Best Gospel Performance, Contemporary
 
winner
Age To Age

Amy Grant, artist.

Best Gospel Performance, Traditional
 
winner
I'm Following You

Blackwood Brothers (Cecil Blackwood, James Blackwood Jr., James Blackwood Sr., Tommy Fairchild, Pat Hoffmaster, Ken Turner), artist.

Best Soul Gospel Performance, Contemporary
 
winner
Higher Plane

Al Green, artist.

Best Soul Gospel Performance, Traditional
 
winner
Precious Lord

Al Green, artist.

Best Inspirational Performance
 
winner
He Set My Life To Music

Barbara Mandrell, artist.

Best Traditional Blues Recording
 
winner
Alright Again

Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown, artist.

Best Ethnic Or Traditional Folk Recording
 
winner
Queen Ida & The Bon Temps Zydeco Band On Tour

Queen Ida (Guillary), artist.

Best Latin Recording
 
winner
Machito & His Salsa Big Band '82

Machito, artist.

Best Recording For Children
 
winner
In Harmony 2

David Levine & Lucy Simon, producers.

Best Comedy Recording
 
winner
Live On The Sunset Strip

Richard Pryor, artist.

Best Spoken Word, Documentary Or Drama Recording
 
winner
Raiders Of The Lost Ark - The Movie On Record

Tom Voegeli, producer.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
John Williams, GRAMMY winner
Flying - Theme From E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

John Williams, composer.

Best Album Of Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or Television Special
 
winner
John Williams, GRAMMY winner
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

John Williams, composer.

Best Cast Show Album
 
winner
Dreamgirls

Henry Krieger, composer. Tom Eyen, lyricist. David Foster, producer.

Video Of The Year
 
winner
Olivia Physical

Olivia Newton-John, artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Gershwin Live!

Sarah Vaughan, artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
An Evening With George Shearing & Mel Tormé

Mel Tormé, artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance Duo Or Group
 
winner
Route 66

Manhattan Transfer (Cheryl Bentyne, Tim Hauser, Alan Paul, Janis Siegel), artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Soloist
 
winner
We Want Miles

Miles Davis, soloist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Group
 
winner
More Live

Phil Woods, artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Big Band
 
winner
Warm Breeze

Count Basie, artist.

Best Arrangement On An Instrumental Recording
 
Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s)
 
winner
Rosanna

David Paich, Jeff Porcaro & Jerry Hey, arrangers.

Best Vocal Arrangement For Two Or More Voices
 
winner
Rosanna

David Paich, arranger.

Best Album Package
 
winner
Get Closer

John Kosh & Ron Larson, art directors.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Bunny Berigan - Giants Of Jazz

John Chilton & Richard M. Sudhalter, album notes writers.

Best Historical Album
 
winner
The Tommy Dorsey/Frank Sinatra Sessions - Vols. 1 ,2 & 3

Alan Dell, Don Wardell & Ethel Gabriel, producers.

Best Engineered Recording - Non-Classical
 
winner
Al Schmitt, GRAMMY winner
Toto IV

Al Schmitt, David Leonard, Greg Ladanyi & Tom Knox, engineers.

Producer Of The Year
 
Best Classical Album
 
winner
Bach: The Goldberg Variations

Glenn Gould, artist. Samuel H. Carter, producer.

Best Orchestral Performance
 
winner
Mahler: Sym. No. 7 In E Min. (Song Of The Night)

James Levine, conductor. Jay David Saks & Thomas Z. Shepard, producers.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Wagner: Der Ring Des Nibelungen

Donald McIntyre, Gwyneth Jones, Heinz Zednik, Hermann Becht, Jeannine Altmeyer, Manfred Jung, Matti Salminen, Ortrun Wenkel, Peter Hofmann & Siegfried Jerusalem, artists. Pierre Boulez, conductor. Andrew Kazdin, producer.

Best Choral Performance (Other Than Opera)
 
winner
Georg Solti, GRAMMY winner
Berlioz: La Damnation De Faust

Margaret Hillis, choir director. Georg Solti, conductor.

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Brahms: The Sonatas For Clarinet & Piano, Op. 120

Richard Goode & Richard Stoltzman, artists.

Best Classical Performance, Instrumental Soloist (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Elgar: Violin Concerto In B Minor

Itzhak Perlman, artist.

Best Classical Performance, Instrumental Soloist (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
Bach: The Goldberg Variations

Glenn Gould, artist.

Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
 
winner
Verdi: Arias (Leontyne Price Sings Verdi)

Leontyne Price, artist.

Best Engineered Recording, Classical
 
winner
Mahler: Symphony No. 7 In E Minor (Song Of The Night)

Paul Goodman, engineer.

Classical Producer Of The Year
 
winner
Robert Woods, GRAMMY winner
Robert Woods