Winners

16th Annual GRAMMY Awards (1973)

Such was the politically charged climate of the times that even consistently amiable host Andy Williams—decked out in a maroon velour tux with wide contrasting black lapels—couldn’t help but make a few Watergate references during the 16th Annual GRAMMY Awards show. Joking about some songs that were not nominated during his opening monologue, Williams mentioned “Why Me,” as sung by John Ehrlichman, Bob Haldeman, John Mitchell and “the whole gang” as Williams called the other Watergate co-conspirators. Even more cutting was a line that Williams later threw into his introduction of soul great and future Chef on “South Park,” Isaac Hayes, whose tremendous musical talents he said, “gave us ‘Shaft,’ which is what we’ve been getting for the last couple years.”

The 16th GRAMMY Awards were a loose and lively affair with a number of extremely soulful performances and a series of wonderful, unlikely co-presenters. The Jackson 5 teamed with jazz drum legend Shelly Manne to very musically present the first award of the broadcast for Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus. The award went to Gladys Knight And The Pips for “Midnight Train To Georgia,” the group’s first win despite three consecutive previous nominations. Knight and the Pips also performed an excellent version of the now classic.

Now in its teen years, these GRAMMYs were a little bawdier than normal as well—hilariously so in the case of Moms Mabley and Kris Kristofferson’s unlikely moment as a comedy duo of sorts attempting to present the award for Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus, also to Gladys Knight And The Pips. Equally entertaining was the extended patter between Helen Reddy and Alice Cooper that found them discussing such pressing issues as the length of his “snake.” After being presented with the GRAMMY for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male, by the unusual partnership of Loretta Lynn and the DeFranco Family, Charlie Rich delivered a smoldering version of “Behind Closed Doors,” his unusually carnal country crossover smash. And a pre-Reverend Al Green steamed up the Palladium with “Call Me (Come Back Home),” one of his sultry bedroom smashes.

The Divine Miss M, Bette Midler, on her way to becoming a huge star with her racy and flamboyant stage act, accepted the Best New Artist award from Karen and Richard Carpenter, whose clean cut image she had earlier parodied in her shows. “My dear, isn’t that a hoot?” Midler said after taking the award from Karen. “I’m surprised she didn’t hit me over the head with it.”

But at sweet 16, The Academy also showed it was beginning to understand its role in preserving music’s legacy. Williams announced the launch of the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame, currently more than 700 titles strong, with the first five inductees: “Body And Soul” by Coleman Hawkins, “The Christmas Song” by Nat “King” Cole, Paul Whiteman’s version of Gershwin’s “Rhapsody In Blue,” “West End Blues” by Louis Armstrong & His Hot Five and Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas” (performed with the Ken Darby Singers).

“Dueling Banjos”—a surprise crossover hit thanks to its appearance in the film Deliverance—won Best Country Instrumental Performance for Steve Mandell and Eric Weissberg, the former wearing quite possibly the biggest sideburns in GRAMMY history. These were also stoned times, and when the smoke cleared the Best Comedy Recording GRAMMY went to Cheech & Chong for Los Cochinos. For reasons related or not, it was also a year marked by a few major sound problems—most notably during Chuck Berry and Little Richard’s performing presentation of the award for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male, to Stevie Wonder for “Superstition” that found the two rock legends trying to name the nominees during rousing renditions of their greatest hits. They ultimately ended up sharing a mic, which Berry accused Richard, perhaps characteristically, of trying to keep to himself.

This was also a banner year for two of the most gifted talents of this or any other era—Roberta Flack and Stevie Wonder. Flack and producer Joel Dorn won the GRAMMY award for Record Of The Year for the second year running—this time for “Killing Me Softly With His Song,” which also won Song Of The Year—an award that went to “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” the previous year. Flack also took home the GRAMMY for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female.

Wonder—in addition to performing an utterly radiant version of “You Are The Sunshine Of My Life”—won four awards this night including Album Of The Year for arguably his greatest album ever, Innervisions. It was a remarkable triumph for a man who had been comatose for a week in the summer of 1973 after a serious car accident. So it was especially moving when Wonder brought his family onstage with him during his multiple acceptance speeches. Wonder dedicated his GRAMMY for Best Pop Performance, Male, for “You Are The Sunshine Of My Life” to fellow nominee Jim Croce, who had died tragically in a plane crash in September of 1973. He also pointed out his brother Calvin, who had saved his life after the accident, and even allowed his mother to say a few words and express her own appreciation for the “sunshine of my life.”

Record Of The Year
 
winner
Killing Me Softly With His Song

Roberta Flack, artist. Joel Dorn, producer.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
Innervisions

Stevie Wonder*, artist. Stevie Wonder*, producer.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Killing Me Softly With His Song

Charles Fox & Norman Gimbel, songwriters.

Best New Artist
 
winner
Bette Midler
Best Instrumental Arrangement
 
winner
Quincy Jones, GRAMMY winner
Summer In The City

Quincy Jones, arranger.

Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)
 
winner
Live And Let Die

George Martin, arranger.

Best Engineered Recording - Non-Classical
 
winner
Innervisions

Malcolm Cecil & Robert Margouleff, engineers.

Best Album Package
 
winner
Tommy

Wilkes And Braun, art director.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
God Is In The House

Dan Morgenstern, album notes writer.

Best Jazz Performance By A Soloist
 
winner
God Is In The House

Art Tatum, soloist.

Best Jazz Performance By A Group
 
winner
Supersax Plays Bird

Supersax (Buddy Clark, Med Flory), artist.

Best Jazz Performance By A Big Band
 
winner
Giant Steps

Woody Herman, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Killing Me Softly With His Song

Roberta Flack, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
You Are The Sunshine Of My Life

Stevie Wonder, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus
 
winner
Neither One Of Us (Wants To Be The First To Say Goodbye)

Gladys Knight And The Pips (William Guest, Bubba Knight, Gladys Knight, Harold Knight, Edward Patten), artist.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001)

Eumir Deodato, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Master Of Eyes

Aretha Franklin, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
Superstition

Stevie Wonder, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo, Group Or Chorus
 
winner
Midnight Train To Georgia

Gladys Knight And The Pips, artist.

Best R&B Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Hang On Sloopy

Ramsey Lewis, artist.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
Superstition

Stevie Wonder, songwriter.

Best Soul Gospel Performance
 
winner
Loves Me Like A Rock

Dixie Hummingbirds, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Let Me Be There

Olivia Newton-John, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Behind Closed Doors

Charlie Rich, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance By A Duo Or Group
 
winner
From The Bottle To The Bottom

Kris Kristofferson & Rita Coolidge, artists.

Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Dueling Banjos

Eric Weissberg & Steve Mandell, artists.

Best Country Song
 
winner
Behind Closed Doors

Kenny O'Dell, songwriter.

Best Inspirational Performance
 
winner
Let's Just Praise The Lord

Bill Gaither Trio (Bill Gaither), artist.

Best Gospel Performance (Other Than Soul Gospel)
 
winner
Release Me (From My Sin)

Blackwood Brothers (Cecil Blackwood, James Blackwood Jr., James Blackwood Sr., Tommy Fairchild, Pat Hoffmaster, Ken Turner), artist.

Best Ethnic Or Traditional Recording (Including Traditional Blues)
 
winner
Then And Now

Doc Watson, artist.

Best Recording For Children
 
winner
Sesame Street Live

Joe Raposo, producer.

Best Comedy Recording
 
winner
Los Cochinos

Cheech And Chong (Tommy Chong, Richard "Cheech" Marin), artist.

Best Spoken Word Recording
 
winner
Jonathan Livingston Seagull

Richard Harris, narrator.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
Last Tango In Paris

Gato Barbieri, composer.

Album Of Best Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special
 
winner
Jonathan Livingston Seagull

Neil Diamond, composer.

Best Score From The Original Cast Show Album
 
winner
A Little Night Music

Stephen Sondheim, composer. Goddard Lieberson, producer.

Album Of The Year, Classical
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Bartók: Concerto For Orchestra

Pierre Boulez, artist. Thomas Z. Shepard, producer.

Best Classical Performance - Orchestra
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Bartók: Concerto For Orchestra

Pierre Boulez, artist.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Bizet: Carmen

Leonard Bernstein, artist. Tom Mowrey, producer.

Best Choral Performance, Classical (Other Than Opera)
 
winner
André Previn
Walton: Belshazzer's Feast

André Previn, artist. Arthur Oldham, choir director.

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Joplin: The Red Back Book

Gunther Schuller, artist.

Best Classical Performance Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Beethoven: Concerti (5) For Piano And Orchestra

Vladimir Ashkenazy, artist.

Best Classical Performance Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
Vladimir Horowitz
Scriabin: Horowitz Plays Scriabin
Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
 
winner
Puccini: Heroines

Leontyne Price, artist.

Best Album Notes - Classical
 
winner
Hindemith: Sonatas For Piano

Glenn Gould, album notes writer.

Best Engineered Recording - Classical
 
winner
Bartók: Concerto For Orchestra

Edward (Bud) T. Graham & Ray Moore, engineers.