searchsearch

Explore Nashville's Legendary Ryman Auditorium | History Of

The latest edition of GRAMMY.com's History Of video series, learn more about the long-standing music venue.

Back in 1892, Nashville businessman Thomas G. Ryman built the Union Gospel Tabernacle church, whose name was changed to Ryman Auditorium to honor him after his death in 1904. In the 1920s, promoter Lula C. Naff rented the building and booked talent, including Marian Anderson, Charlie Chaplin, Bob Hope and Doris Day, who made the city a cultural destination. 

While the beloved, intimate venue—it seats 2,362 people—sat dormant for almost 30 years, it was renovated and revived in the early-'90s; it has since hosted many more iconic shows from the likes of Brandi Carlile, Kane Brown, Kelsea Ballerini and Wu-Tang Clan.

How Austin City Limits Grew Into One Of Texas’ Most Popular Music Fests | History Of

Share