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GRAMMY Museum And The Latin Recording Academy Announce The Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Latin Media Gallery
Gabriel Abaroa, Jr.

Photo: JC Olivera/Getty Images for The Latin Recording Academy.

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GRAMMY Museum And The Latin Recording Academy Announce The Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Latin Media Gallery

Former Latin Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa, Jr. was responsible for the transition of the Latin GRAMMY telecast from English to Spanish, among many other accomplishments. The GRAMMY Museum's Latin Music Gallery has been renamed in his honor.

GRAMMYs/Mar 8, 2022 - 11:37 pm

The GRAMMY Museum and the Latin Recording Academy have renamed the permanent gallery in the museum as the Gabriel Abaroa, Jr. Latin Media Gallery, in honor of former Latin Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa, Jr.

Abaroa was awarded with the honor during a private reception attended by the Board of Trustees of both the Latin Academy and the Recording Academy, the Museum and the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation, as well as Abaroa’s family and close friends.

"Gabriel’s almost two decades of leadership at the Latin Academy was a key influence for the worldwide impact, awareness and growth of Latin music," said Michael Sticka, President and CEO of the GRAMMY Museum.

Working in collaboration with the Latin Academy, the Museum renovated its third floor in 2019 to expand its Latin-themed exhibits and showcase the international resonance of Latin music. Currently on display in the Gabriel Abaroa, Jr. Latin Media Gallery is "Y Para Siempre… Marco Antonio Solís," which highlights the life of the renowned Mexican singer.

Abaroa's 20-year tenure at the Latin Academy has resulted in outstanding growth and exceptional financial stability. Some of his key accomplishments include implementing a strong Board of Trustees while fostering a healthy relationship with the Recording Academy, and assembling a team of talented and passionate executives and staffers. He was responsible for the transition of the Latin GRAMMY telecast from English to Spanish.

Under Abaroa’s leadership in 2018, the Latin Academy signed an unprecedented agreement extending an established partnership with Univision through 2028. In 2014, Abaroa led the establishment of the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation, which furthers international awareness and appreciation of Latin music and its makers through college scholarships, grants and educational programs.

In 2021, Abaroa became President Emeritus of the Latin Academy, a newly created senior advisory role that will include working on assigned strategic projects.

"Gabriel’s unique leadership style truly exemplified the values of our organization: excellence, integrity and passion," said Latin Academy CEO Manuel Abud. "The Latin Media Gallery that will carry his name is a testament to his legacy, and will reinforce our rich heritage of supporting and honoring Latin music and its creators."

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5 Things To Know About Yoshiki: A Musical Childhood, Upcoming Tour & Playing Through Pain
Yoshiki performs at the GRAMMY Museum

Photo: Rebecca Sapp/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

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5 Things To Know About Yoshiki: A Musical Childhood, Upcoming Tour & Playing Through Pain

The multi-hyphenate rock and classical musician dropped by the GRAMMY Museum for an intimate chat with the Museum’s curator, as well as a performance of some stripped-down songs.

GRAMMYs/May 18, 2023 - 08:18 pm

A select group of fans and die-hards got up close and personal with Yoshiki when he popped into the GRAMMY Museum for an intimate chat and performance. 

A multi-hyphenate in the truest sense of the world, Yoshiki has spent the past few decades balancing his work as a musician, songwriter, composer, producer, fashion designer and winemaker, producing a diverse and robust body of work. As the leader and co-founder of X Japan, he helped inspire the rock scene's striking visual kei movement, something that wasn’t always easy — in the early '80s,  it was hard for him to even get a cab in Tokyo with his big, blonde, spiked hair.

He’s since gone on to found another musical supergroup, The Last Rockstars, and he’s become a big name in the classical world, producing several studio albums and collaborating with everyone from George Martin to Bono to Sarah Brightman. He has penned music for TV and film, written a concerto for the Japanese emperor, and even launched his own celebrated line of kimonos, Yoshikimono.

Yoshiki has lived a truly fascinating whirlwind of a life for the past few decades, and he was happy to open up about much of it in this week’s conversation. Here are five things we learned at the GRAMMY Museum event "The Drop: Yoshiki." 

He Has A Long History With & Bold Future In Classical Music

Yoshiki sat down with Jasen Emmons, the Museum’s Chief Curator, for an hour-long discussion about the star’s career in the music industry, which he says was first nurtured when he was given a piano at age 4. He took to the instrument pretty much instantly, choosing to play in his darkened bedroom because he liked the vibe. His music-loving parents kept giving him instruments — one each year for his birthday — leading him to take up everything from the trumpet (which he quit after seeing a picture of himself playing) to the drums. 

He’s become wildly famous for both his percussion and piano skills, and this fall, will embark on a four-city tour of classical venues. On his Requiem tour, which begins in October, Yoshiki will become the first Japanese artist ever to headline Carnegie Hall, Royal Albert Hall, the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles, and the Tokyo Garden Theater.  

His Upcoming Classical Tour Is Inspired By His Late Mother

The name "Requiem," Yoshiki said, comes from a piece he wrote for his mother, who passed away in 2022. When she died, he told Emmons, he couldn’t stop crying for three or four days. Yoshiki went to seek the help of a doctor, who told him he just had to embrace his grief. 

He turned to composing, and as he told the room, "my tears turned into melody," and the solemn concerto slowly emerged. It’s still unfinished — there’s no strings arrangement yet, he says — but it’s one of the pieces he’ll be performing on tour later this year. 

Yoshiki Works A Lot, But At His Own Pace

Speaking of tours: Yoshiki also gave fans in attendance some hints about future tours, saying he’s working to bring the Last Rockstars back to the states sometime in the future, noting that they’re working on a new record but poking fun at his work load and perfectionism by joking, "Everything I’m involved in takes time." 

That includes "Angel," the new single from X Japan due to be released July 28. At the show, he performed an abbreviated classical arrangement of the song with Orchid Quartet and the singer Beverly. It’s an arrangement he’ll also most likely be performing on his classical shows, though Yoshiki says the X Japan version of the track will be much more rock-focused, with ample drums and guitar.

Yoshiki said that he wrote "Angel" some time ago, and that he composes music pretty much constantly. "Melodies fall into me even now," he said, noting that the frequency with which he hears music is "pretty much endless." 

When he composes a song, he added, it’s just about transposing the vision in his head. Actually laying it down in a studio gets more complicated, Yoshiki said, in part because he views recording as a "compromising process" that never quite sounds like he envisions in his mind. 

He Thinks Rock And Classical Music Have A Lot In Common 

As far as Yoshiki is concerned, any good melody can become both a rock track and a classical cut. He cited the example of Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto no. 2, which he says has a second movement that he thinks sounds like Celine Dion — or, as he joked, does Celine Dion sound like Rachmaninoff? He thinks it can go either way, showing Emmons and the audience what he meant by playing a few bars of some of his more rock-oriented tracks on his piano. 

Yoshiki Has Given His Entire Body And Soul To Performing

Though he looks to be about 30 years old, Yoshiki is actually well into his fifties and years of feverish performance have taken a toll on his body. That’s clear in We Are X, a movie about the history of X Japan, where viewers can see Yoshiki getting frequent cortisone injections into his neck and back. He told Emmons he thinks he’s had hundreds at this point, as well as two neck surgeries. (He might even have a third one, he said.) 

That’s because, as he explained, he likes to play "every single show as if this was my last stage," and always tries "to give 1,000 percent." Yoshiki says he doesn’t always realize the pain he’s in until after he’s left the stage, though he does seem to think it’s all worth it, since as he told the audience, "I was given this life. I just want to go all the way." 

Of course, Yoshiki was also full of jokes at the event, telling silly stories about his first time getting acupuncture, when he was so new to the process that he worried about whether he’d be able to take a bath after the procedure, lest water seep in though all the holes left in his body. He poked fun at his last-minute whims, including flying Beverly over from the Philippines just for the show. He also told a story about eating Fugu, or blowfish, every single day for the three months he was just in Japan, in part because that’s what his staff kept ordering for him. 

Amidst wrapping up the show with performances of "Miracle," "Red Swan," and "Endless Rain," Yoshiki stopped for a moment to call out to his friends in the audience, including Lollapalooza co-founder Marc Geiger and Joelle Benioff, the mother of Yoshiki’s good friend, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff. (The latter was actually sitting in the seat that Yoshiki had sponsored in the Clive Davis Theater, which is pretty cool.) 

Yoshiki wrapped up the evening by addressing the audience in a way that seemed both soft and sincere, saying, "because of you, I’m still here creating music" and adding, "I hope the music I create can help you, too." 

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212 Quarterfinalists Announced For The 2024 Music Educator Award
Music Educator Award

Photo Courtesy of the Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum

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212 Quarterfinalists Announced For The 2024 Music Educator Award

The Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum have announced the quarterfinalists for the 2024 Music Educator Award, which recognizes educators who have made a significant contribution and demonstrate a commitment to music education.

GRAMMYs/May 8, 2023 - 01:00 pm

Today, the Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum have announced a total of 212 music teachers as quarterfinalists for the 2024 Music Educator Award, which recognizes current educators — kindergarten through college across public and private schools — who have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education and who demonstrate a commitment to the broader cause of maintaining music education in the schools. The quarterfinalists, who hail from 197 cities, were selected from more than 2,000 initial submitted nominations. In addition to the quarterfinalists, 123 legacy applicants from 2023 will also be eligible to win the Music Educator Award this year.

Semi-finalists for the 2024 Music Educator Award will be announced this September. The ultimate recipient will be recognized during GRAMMY Week 2024.

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A joint partnership and presentation between the Recording Academy and GRAMMY Museum, the Music Educator Award is open to current U.S. music teachers, and anyone can nominate a teacher — students, parents, friends, colleagues, community members, school deans, and administrators. Teachers are also able to nominate themselves, and nominated teachers are notified and invited to fill out an application.

Each year, one recipient is selected from 10 finalists and recognized for their remarkable impact on students' lives. The 10th annual honoree will be flown to Los Angeles to attend the 2024 GRAMMYs, officially known as the 66th GRAMMY Awards, as well as a range of GRAMMY Week events. The nine additional finalists will receive a $1,000 honorarium, and the schools of all 10 finalists will receive matching grants. Fifteen semi-finalists will receive a $500 honorarium with matching school grants.

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The matching grants provided to the schools are made possible by the generosity and support of the GRAMMY Museum’s Education Champion Ford Motor Company Fund. In addition, the American Choral Directors Association, National Association for Music Education, NAMM Foundation, and National Education Association support this program through outreach to their constituencies.

Learn more about the Music Educator Award.

See the full list of the 2024 Music Educator Award quarterfinalists and legacy applicants below:

2024 MUSIC EDUCATOR AWARD QUARTERFINALISTS

Name School City State
Casie Adams Martinsburg High School Martinsburg West Virginia
Bruce Adams Sam Houston High School San Antonio Texas
Miguel Aguiar Southwest High School San Antonio Texas
Derek Alexander Orville Bright Elementary School Chicago Illinois
Dawn Amthor Wallkill Senior High School Wallkill New York
Jonathan Anderson University High School (Volusia) Orange City Florida
Christopher Andrews Hephzibah High School Hephzibah Georgia
Jeanne Andrews Pauline J. Petway Elementary School Vineland New Jersey
Justin Antos Dwight D. Eisenhower High School Blue Island Illinois
Javier Arau New York Jazz Academy New York New York
Andrea  Armour Christian County Middle School Hopkinsville Kentucky
Timothy Arnold Orono High School Long Lake Minnesota
Shawn Athey Veterans Memorial High School Corpus Christi Texas
Elizabeth Baker Mary Martin Elementary Weatherford Texas
Jeremy Bartunek Greenbriar School Northbrook Illinois
Adem Birson New York University New York New York
Benjamen Blasko Lipscomb University Nashville Tennessee
Amanda  Blevins Tri-Valley High School Dresden Ohio
Susan Boddie Valdosta State University Valdosta Georgia
Adrain  Bonner Lancaster High School Lancaster Texas
Cherie  Bowe Pascagoula High School Pascagoula Mississippi
Andrew Bowerly Tenino High School Tenino Washington
George Bradshaw Dover Area High School Dover Pennsylvania
Gwendolyn Brazier Lathrop High School Fairbanks Alaska
Steve Browne Nashville Community High School Nashville Illinois
Matthew Brusseau Davie County High School Mocksville North Carolina
Ryan Bulgarelli Loyalsock Township High School Williamsport Pennsylvania
Cathryn Burt East Newton High School Granby Missouri
James Byrn, Jr. Maconaquah High School Bunker Hill Indiana
Mary Catherine Campbell Seven Pines Elementary Sandston Virginia
Helen Capehart Bridgeport High School Bridgeport Texas
Marcos Carreras Conservatory of The Arts Springfield Massachusetts
Michael "Patrick" Carte Scott High School Madison West Virginia
Curtis Carver Harlem High School Harlem Georgia
Roger Chagnon III Westfield Academy and Central School Westfield New York
Kristopher Chandler Gautier High School Gautier Mississippi
Jeff Chang Decatur High School Federal Way Washington
Krista Clay West Branch High School Beloit Ohio
Travis Coakley William Carey University Hattiesburg Mississippi
Vanessa Cobb Montgomery Central High School Cunningham Tennessee
Mark Collins John S. Battle High School Bristol Virginia
Trish Conover Community Middle School Plainsboro New Jersey
John Contreras Pueblo High School Tucson Arizona
Kyle Cook Western Branch Middle School Chesapeake Virginia
Travis Cook Plymouth Christian Academy Canton Michigan
Daniel Cook University of North Texas Denton Texas
Andrew Cote Merrimack College North Andover Massachusetts
Drew Cowell Belleville East High School Belleville Illinois
Cory Craig Benton Intermediate School Benton Louisiana
Matthew Cunningham Brockton High School Brockton Massachusetts
Shannon Curtis Zimmerman Middle High School Zimmerman Minnesota
Isaac Daniel Stax Music Academy Memphis Tennessee
Jim Daughters Southeast Missouri State University Cape Girardeau Missouri
Marci DeAmbrose Lincoln Southwest High School Lincoln Nebraska
Jackie Deen Pottsboro High School Pottsboro Texas
Matthew Denman Classen School of Advanced Studies Oklahoma City Oklahoma
Ryan Diefenderfer Paradise Valley High School Phoenix Arizona
Jennifer DiVasto Pennridge High School Perkasie Pennsylvania
Antoine  Dolberry P.S. 103x Hector Fontanez Bronx New York
George Dragoo Stevens High School Rapid City South Dakota
Marisa Drake Patuxent High School Lusby Maryland
Kathleen  Dudley Andrew Cooke Magnet School Waukegan Illinois
Jonathan  Eising James Hubert Blake High School Silver Spring Maryland
Jonathan Eldridge Weston High School Weston Massachusetts
Carol Evans Gwynedd Mercy University Gwynedd Valley Pennsylvania
Anthony Ferreira Suffield High West Suffield Connecticut
Tamara Frazier North Valleys High School Reno Nevada
J.D. Frizzell Briarcrest Christian School Eads Tennessee
Chesteron Frye St. Helena College & Career Academy Greensburg Louisiana
Nicholas Garofalo Chattahoochee High School Johns Creek Georgia
Matt Gerry Salina South Middle School Salina Kansas
Anna Girling Sebastopol Attendance Center Sebastopol Mississippi
Vivian Gonzalez Miami Arts Studio 6-12 @ Zelda Glazer Miami Florida
Johnathan Gore Sandy Run K8 School Swansea South Carolina
Serena Gorham Weare Middle School Weare New Hampshire
Kylie Griffin Dozier Elementary Erath Louisiana
Jess Gronberg Hawkes Bluff Elementary Davie Florida
Alan Guckian Manor High School Manor Texas
Nathaniel Gunter Greer High School Greer South Carolina
Amy Hannequin Bethel Middle School Bethel Connecticut
Crystal Harding Ypsilanti Community High School Ypsilanti Michigan
Diana  Harrigan Bloom High School Chicago Heights Illinois
Toye Harris Miami High School Miami Oklahoma
Chris Hayslette Bridgeport Middle School Bridgeport West Virginia
Colette Hebert Ella Fitzgerald Academy Yonkers New York
Martha Heise Seventh Street Elementary School Oil City Pennsylvania
Jonathan Helmick Slippery Rock University Slippery Rock Pennsylvania
Corey Hermens Grant County High School Dry Ridge Kentucky
Joel Hill Velma Jackson High School and Shirley D. Simmons Middle School Camden Mississippi
Autumn Danielle Hodges Clarksville- Kraus Middle School Clarksville Arkansas
Elaine Holmes Comsewogue High School Port Jefferson Station New York
Gene Hundley Swainsboro Middle School Swainsboro Georgia
Victor Iapalucci Philip Barbour High School Philippi West Virginia
Devin James Salem High School Conyers Georgia
Heidi Jaye Daniel Webster Elementary School New Rochelle New York
Luke Johnson Ingalls Elementary Ingalls Kansas
Jamie Jones Manzano Day School Albuquerque New Mexico
Tyler Jones Thompson Middle School Alabaster Alabama
Daniel Joosten Edgerton High School Edgerton Wisconsin
Brett Keith Northern Bedford County Middle/High School Loysburg Pennsylvania
Deonte Kennedy Craigmont High School Memphis Tennessee
Matthew Kilby Fort Dorchester HS North Charleston South Carolina
Lou Kitchner Bedford Middle School Westport Connecticut
Michael Kiyoi San Marcos High School Santa Barbara California
Kate Klotz Monarch High School Louisville Colorado
Heidi Kohler Clarence Middle School Clarence New York
Michael Lapomardo Shrewsbury High School Shrewsbury Massachusetts
Michael Lee Jericho Middle School Jericho New York
Morgan Lentino Otter Creek Elementary Elgin Illinois
Joshua Light Soddy-Daisy HS Soddy-Daisy Tennessee
Lisa Linde Newton South High school Newton Massachusetts
Wes Lowe The King's Academy West Palm Beach Florida
Cole Lundquist Gloucester High School Gloucester Massachusetts
Robert Mamminga St. Francis High School Wheaton Illinois
Peter Manzi Carlsbad High School Carlsbad California
Samuel Maran Lake High School Millbury Ohio
Jayson Martinez Arts High School Newark New Jersey
Kevin McDonald Wellesley High School Wellesley Massachusetts
Jill Melchitzky Northwestern Middle School Albion Pennsylvania
Larrian Menifee Ball High School Galveston Texas
Kimberly Mettert East Noble Middle School Kendallville Indiana
Natalie Moore Sullivan High School Sullivan Missouri
Mario Morales Granbury High School Granbury Texas
Coty Raven Morris Portland State University Portland Oregon
Brian Nabors Shelby High School Shelby Ohio
Jenny Neff The University of the Arts Philadelphia Pennsylvania
Cassandra Nelson Mountaineer Middle Morgantown West Virginia
Trevor Nicholas Senn Arts at Nicholas Senn High School Chicago Illinois
Adam Nobile Big Spring High School Newville Pennsylvania
Sam Noyce Thomas Jefferson Jr. High School Kearns Utah
Tim O'Donnell Ephrata High School Ephrata Washington
John Panella Cottondale High School Cottondale Florida
James Patterson Kingstree High School Kingstree South Carolina
Shakia Paylor City Neighbors High School Baltimore Maryland
Fernando Penaloza Savanna High School Anaheim California
Kathy Perconti Wayne Central High School Ontario Center New York
Jordan Peters Dr. E Alma Flagg School Newark New Jersey
Catherine Plichta Theatre Arts Production Company School Bronx New York
Felix Ponce Back of the Yards College Preparatory High School Chicago Illinois
David Pope Baldwin Wallace University Berea Ohio
Ær Queen Braddock Elementary School Annandale Virginia
Brian Querry Charles A. Huston Middle School Lower Burrell Pennsylvania
Rebecca Raber University of Mary Bismarck North Dakota
Marc Ratner Mineola High School Garden City Park New York
Lance Rauh Patriot Oaks Academy St Johns Florida
Hoza Redditt MSA East Academy St. Gabriel Louisiana
Heather Rentz St. Mark Westpark Cleveland Ohio
Aaron Rex Mason Middle School Mason Ohio
Angela Rex Riverside Middle School Greer South Carolina
Chris Richard Rogers Heritage High School Rogers Arkansas
Sarah Riechers Thurgood Marshall Elementary School Manassas Virginia
Stephanie Robertson Ponchatoula High School Ponchatoula Louisiana
Bethany Robinson Noblesville High School Noblesville Indiana
Keith Robinson Jefferson Avenue Elementary Seguin Texas
Alberto Rodriguez Mount Vernon High School Alexandria Virginia
Chad Rose Sheridan High School Sheridan Wyoming
Stewart Rosen Walter Reed Middle School North Hollywood California
Shawn Royer Marian University Indianapolis Indiana
Dayshawn Russell North Iberville Elementary Rosedale Louisiana
Hannah Ryan University of Virginia's College at Wise Wise Virginia
Kyle Ryan Turkey Hill School Orange Connecticut
Ashley Sands Kennedy Secondary School Fergus Falls Minnesota
Mark Santos Santa Ana High School Santa Ana California
Danni Schmitt Roland Park Elementary/Middle School Baltimore Maryland
Kevin Schoenbach Oswego High School Oswego Illinois
Eric Schultz Coastal Carolina University Conway South Carolina
Jessica Schwartz Denham Springs High School Denham Springs Louisiana
Josh Settlemyre R.J. Reynolds High School Winston-Salem North Carolina
Jason Shiuan Saratoga High School Saratoga California
Katie Silcott Olentangy Shanahan Middle School Lewis Center Ohio
Kerra Simmons Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts Fort Worth Texas
Joani  Slawson Holy Trinity Episcopal Academy Melbourne Florida
Timothy Patrick Sloan Sr. Albright Middle School Houston Texas
Jessie Smith Yes Prep Public Schools Houston Texas
Cathryn Smith Coleman High School Coleman Texas
Patrick Smith Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School New Haven Connecticut
Tony Spano Culver City High School Culver City California
Wes Sparkes Eagleview Middle School Colorado Springs Colorado
Julian Spires Meade Middle School Fort Meade Maryland
Shannon Stem University Academy Panama City Florida
Harold Stephan Stuyvesant High School New York New York
Cassandra Sulbaran Braintree High School Braintree Massachusetts
Lynn Sweet Mount Anthony Union High School Bennington Vermont
Agnes Tech Indian Prairie Elementary School Crystal Lake Illinois
Chris Toomey Mineola High School Garden City Park New York
Tom Torrento Grosse Pointe North High School Grosse Pointe Woods Michigan
Jessica Torres Elmont Memorial Jr. Sr. High School Elmont New York
Michelle Trinidad Sacred Heart School Bronx New York
Alice Tsui New Bridges Elementary Brooklyn New York
Jordan Tupper Episcopal School of Baton Rouge Baton Rouge Louisiana
Martin Urbach Harvest Collegiate High School New York City New York
Johny Vargas Pueblo High School Tucson Arizona
Amy Villanova Canyon Crest Academy San Diego California
Valerie Vinnard Webster Elementary Long Beach California
Kenneth Walker Ralls High School Ralls Texas
Kathy Wallace Willard Elementary Winchester Indiana
Jennifer Walter University of North Carolina at Greensboro Greensboro North Carolina
John Ware Stovall Middle School Houston Texas
Brandon Weeks North Polk High School Alleman Iowa
Lisa Werner St. Bruno Parish School Dousman Wisconsin
Scott Weyman Solanco High School Quarryville Pennsylvania
Elizabeth White Holcomb RIII Holcomb Missouri
Tyler Wigglesworth West Covina High School West Covina California
Derrick Williams Vista Heights Middle School Moreno Valley California
Paula Williams The Ron Clark Academy Atlanta Georgia
Sandi Wilson Franklin School of Innovation Asheville North Carolina
Matthew Wiltshire Lewiston High School Lewiston Maine
Damion Womack The Montgomery Academy Montgomery Alabama
Tammy Yi Chapman University Orange California
Nicholas Young Altus High School Altus Oklahoma
Jason Younts Samuel V. Champion High School Boerne Texas
DeAnna Zecchin Indian River High School Dagsboro Delaware

2024 MUSIC EDUCATOR AWARD LEGACY APPLICANTS

Name School City State
Phil Aguglia Kenmore East High School Tonawanda New York
Heather Akers Central Middle School Dover Delaware
Eric Allen Western Middle School for the Arts Louisville Kentucky
Calandria Allen Zachary Community Schools Zachary Louisiana
Abigail Alwin Clague Middle School Ann Arbor Public Schools Michigan
David Amos Heritage Middle School Painesville Ohio
Luke Aumann Appleton North High School Appleton Wisconsin
Elizabeth Baker Ilima Intermediate School Ewa Beach Hawaiʻi
Andre Barnes Science Park High School Newark New Jersey
Conesha Barron Lanier High School Jackson Mississippi
Lyndra Bastian Creekside Middle School and Woodstock High School Woodstock Illinois
William Bennett Cane Bay High School Summerville South Carolina
Heather Bice Ridgeview High School Orange Park Florida
Charlie Bradberry Iowa Park High School Iowa Park Texas
Justin Britt Kingston Public Schools Kingston Oklahoma
Shantavia Burchette East Side High School Newark New Jersey
John Burn Homestead High School Cupertino California
Alexander Busby Oviedo High School Oviedo Florida
Aaron Bush Foxborough High School Foxborough Massachusetts
Meg Byrne Pleasant Valley High School Bettendorf Iowa
Philip Carter O'Fallon Township High School O'Fallon Illinois
Elizabeth Carter Snowden School Memphis Tennessee
Francis Cathlina University of Memphis Memphis Tennessee
Tiffany Chiang Mark Twain I.S. 239 Brooklyn New York
Ernesta Chicklowski Roosevelt Elementary Tampa Florida
Michael Coelho Ipswich Middle School and Ipswich High School Ipswich Massachusetts
Christine Cumberledge Central Junior High School Euless Texas
Heather Dipasquale Todd County Middle School Elkton Kentucky
Jack A. Eaddy, Jr. Western Carolina University Cullowhee North Carolina
Dominique Eade New England Conservatory of Music Boston Massachusetts
Cuauhtemoc Escobedo Eckstein Middle School Seattle Washington
Jasmine Faulkner Polaris Expeditionary Learning School Fort Collins Colorado
Daniel James Felton Tartan High School Oakdale Minnesota
Nicholas Fernandez Bentonville Schools Bentonville Arkansas
Cathryn Fowler Health Careers High School San Antonio Texas
Marisa Frank Explore! Community School Nashville Tennessee
Jasmine Fripp KIPP Nashville Collegiate High School Nashville Tennessee
Jacob Garcia Tennyson Middle School Waco Texas
Jorge L. Garcia Elias Herrera Middle School Laredo Texas
Tina Gibson Jefferson County Traditional Middle School Louisville Kentucky
Alex Gittelman Haverford Middle School Havertown Pennsylvania
Guillermo Gonzalez James A. Garfield High School Los Angeles California
Mansa Gory Denzel Washington School of the Arts Mount Vernon New York
Deanna Grandstaff Cecil Intermediate School McDonald Pennsylvania
Amanda Hanzlik E.O. Smith High School Storrs Connecticut
Marvin Haywood John Ehret High School Marrero Louisiana
Kristin Howell Syosset High School Syosset New York
Emmanuel Hudson Booker T. Washington High School Shreveport Louisiana
Karla Hulne Blair-Taylor Middle/High School Blair Wisconsin
Mia Ibrahim Health Opportunities High School Bronx New York
Luis Ingels Candor Elementary School Candor New York
Justin Janer Pinewood School Middle Campus Los Altos California
Daryl Jessen Dakota Valley School North Sioux City South Dakota
De'Evin Johnson Duncanville High School Duncanville Texas
Amir Jones Harvey High School Painesville Ohio
Allison Kline Blue Mountain Area School Orwigsburg Pennsylvania
Kenneth Kosterman Rockwall-Heath High School Heath Texas
Joshua Krohn Brent Elementary School Washington District of Columbia
Sarah Labovitz Arkansas State University Jonesboro Arkansas
Heather Leppard Girls Academic Leadership Academy (GALA) Los Angeles California
Hope Lewis Charles O. Dickerson HS Trumansburg New York
Meredith Lord Burncoat High School Worcester Massachusetts
Brendon Lucas Nyack High School Nyack New York
Christian Lucas Mariners Christian School Costa Mesa California
Alison McCarrey Romig Middle School Anchorage Alaska
Angie McDaniel Forest Creek Elementary Round Rock Texas
Ashleigh McDaniel Spatz Burgess Peterson Academy Atlanta Georgia
Matthew McKagan Lindero Canyon Middle School Agoura Hills California
Brian McMath Northwest Guilford High School Greensboro     North Carolina
Phillip McMullen Silver Creek Central Schools Silver Creek New York
Tracy Meldrum Verrado High School Buckeye Arizona
Xochilt Melendez Munguia Gainesville Middle School for the Arts and Sciences Gainesville Virginia
Kris Milby Greenup County High School Greenup Kentucky
Dana Monteiro Frederick Douglass Academy New York New York
Shelby Montgomery George Jenkins High School Lakeland Florida
David Moore Inspire Charter Academy Baton Rouge Louisiana
Ryan Moseley Appoquinimink High School Middletown Delaware
David Moss West Hopkins School Nebo Kentucky
Deborah Muhlenbruck-Fleischer Gunderson Middle School Las Vegas Nevada
Vicki Nichols Grandview Elementary Grandview Texas
Jeremy Overbeck Century High School Bismarck North Dakota
John Pachence Penn State Abington Abington Pennsylvania
Jennifer Page Niles North High School Skokie Illinois
Matthew Pitts Robert JC Rice Elementary School Gilbert Arizona
Courtney Powers Muhammad Ali School 23 Passaic New Jersey
Natalie Pratt Brentwood High School Brentwood Tennessee
William Rank Oak Prairie Junior High School Lockport Illinois
Brett Rankin Wilde Lake High School Columbia Maryland
Annie Ray Annandale High School Annandale Virginia
Tracy Resseguie Staley High School Kansas City Missouri
Giovanni Santos La Sierra University Riverside California
Ruth Schwartz Chugiak High School and Mirror Lake Middle School Chugiak Alaska
Laura Shapovalov Walden III Middle and High School Racine Wisconsin
James Sheffer Medford Memorial Middle School and Haines Sixth Grade Center Medford New Jersey
Matthew Shephard Meridian Early College High School Sanford Michigan
Dylan Sims York Middle School York South Carolina
Thomas Slater Chestnut Oaks Middle School Sumter South Carolina
Michele Slone Urbana Elementary and Jr. High School Urbana Ohio
Tony Small St. Vincent Pallotti Arts Academy Laurel Maryland
Andrew Smith Charlotte Central School Charlotte Vermont
Wayne Splettstoeszer Torrington High School Torrington Connecticut
Elizabeth Steege Cass High School Racine Wisconsin
Lawrence Stoffel California State University, Northridge Los Angeles California
Tyler Swick Robert and Sandy Ellis Elementary Henderson Nevada
Elizabeth Taylor La Crosse Elementary School La Crosse Virginia
Cami Tedoldi Foxborough High School Foxborough Massachusetts
Kylie Teston Leonardtown High School Leonardtown Maryland
Jonathan Todd Palisades High School Charlotte North Carolina
Matthew Trevino Roan Forest Elementary San Antonio Texas
Alexis True Thomas Downey High School Modesto California
Gregory Urban Dunedin Highland Middle School Dunedin Florida
Jon Usher Hidden Springs Elementary Moreno Valley California
Michael Vasquez Charles L. Kuentz Jr. Elementary Helotes Texas
Aaron Vogel Mountain Ridge High School Glendale Arizona
Bryen Warfield Homestead High School Fort Wayne Indiana
Sarah Wehmeier Aparicio Waukesha South High School Waukesha Wisconsin
Christopher White Hickory Ridge High School Harrisburg North Carolina
Tammy White Kiser Middle School Greensboro North Carolina
Tyron Williams New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities IV Far Rockaway New York
Krista Williams Floretta P. Carson Visual and Performing Arts Academy Mobile Alabama
Kelly Winovich Northgate Middle/Senior High School Pittsburgh Pennsylvania
Hayley Winslow Snow Canyon Middle School Saint George Utah
Ronnie Ziccardi Avonworth Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

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2023 Latin GRAMMYs To Host First-Ever International Telecast In Sevilla, Spain, On Nov. 16; Nominations To Be Announced Sept. 19
Art for the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs

Graphic Courtesy of the Latin Recording Academy

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2023 Latin GRAMMYs To Host First-Ever International Telecast In Sevilla, Spain, On Nov. 16; Nominations To Be Announced Sept. 19

Airing on Thursday, Nov. 16, the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs marks the first-ever international telecast in the history of the organization and awards.

GRAMMYs/May 4, 2023 - 04:29 pm

The Latin GRAMMYs are going global! Today, the Latin Recording Academy announced that the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs, officially known as the 24th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards, will be held in Sevilla, Spain. Airing on Thursday, Nov. 16, from the Conference and Exhibition Centre (FIBES), the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs marks the first-ever international telecast in the history of the organization and awards.

Nominees for the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs will be announced on Tuesday, Sept. 19.

The announcement also marks the official start of a three-year partnership between the Latin Recording Academy and the Junta de Andalucía, who will sponsor the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs and Latin GRAMMY Week, as well as several Latin Academy events in the community. In addition, Sevilla joins the celebration as host city for all the events during this year's Latin GRAMMY Week, which will precede the Latin GRAMMY telecast.

This year's Latin GRAMMY Week includes the Person of the Year Gala, the Special Awards Presentation, the Leading Ladies of Entertainment luncheon, the Best New Artist showcase, the latter of which recognizes the nominees in that category, and a nominee reception, among other events.

The Latin GRAMMY telecast will be produced by TelevisaUnivision in collaboration with Radio Televisión Española (RTVE).

With the awards show expanding to Spain, the Latin Recording Academy, the organization behind the annual Latin GRAMMY Awards, is further evolving its mission to support and elevate Latin music on a global scale. Earlier this year, the Latin Recording Academy also announced the addition of several globally minded awards categories, including the Best Portuguese-Language Urban Performance category, which will be introduced at the upcoming 2023 Latin GRAMMYs.

“International growth is consistent with our mission,” Latin Recording Academy CEO Manuel Abud said in an exclusive interview. “The Latin Academy, our membership, and the music we honor have always been global. We have members from more than 40 countries, and we've always celebrated music in the Spanish language and the Portuguese language. Now, the only thing that is changing is that we're taking the celebration to another place, which will ultimately expand our global reach even further.”

Learn More: 2023 Latin GRAMMYs Explained: 4 Reasons To Be Excited About The New Categories & Changes

"It is an honor to celebrate our Latin GRAMMY Week in Sevilla and commit to our mission of elevating Latin music and its creators around the world. We are confident that it will be a memorable celebration," Abud further expanded in a statement.

"We are thrilled to produce the Latin GRAMMYs for the first time this year in Spain, and in a new partnership with the prestigious RTVE," Ignacio Meyer, President of U.S. Networks at TelevisaUnivision, said. "This is an extraordinary moment for Latin music globally and we are confident that this partnership with RTVE, and the passion and energy that Univision brings to the show, will make history and deliver an unforgettable experience for audiences who love and enjoy music all around the world."

"It will be an honor for RTVE to participate in the transmission and production of the 24th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards and we are working hard to accomplish it," said Elena Sánchez Caballero, President of Radio Televisión Española. "Music is more than an art form, it's a vehicle that unites us collectively, and we look forward to providing the best possible coverage for our viewers."

Additional key dates on the road to the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs include:

  • July 27, 2023 - August 7, 2023: First Round of Voting

  • Sept. 19: 2023 Latin GRAMMYs nominees announced

  • Sept. 29, 2023 - Oct. 12, 2023: Final Round of Voting

  • Nov. 16: 2023 Latin GRAMMY Awards Telecast

Learn more information regarding the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs awards season.

Follow GRAMMY.com all year long as we continue to announce more news and updates about the 2023 Latin GRAMMYs.

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5 Things We Learned From GRAMMY Museum's New The Power Of Song Exhibit, A Celebration Of Songwriters From Tom Petty To Taylor Swift
A selection of items on display at Power of Song Exhibit at the GRAMMY Museum.

Photo: Rebecca Sapp

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5 Things We Learned From GRAMMY Museum's New The Power Of Song Exhibit, A Celebration Of Songwriters From Tom Petty To Taylor Swift

Nile Rodgers, Jimmy Jam, Smokey Robinson and more provide deep insights into their hit collaborations and creative process at GRAMMY Museum's The Power of Song: A Songwriters Hall of Fame Exhibit, open from April 26 through Sept. 4.

GRAMMYs/Apr 26, 2023 - 08:23 pm

Since its founding in 1969, the Songwriters Hall of Fame has been celebrating the great songwriters and composers of our time. In 2010, it found a physical home at Downtown Los Angeles' GRAMMY Museum.

Now, the GRAMMY Museum is adding to that legacy with a special expanded exhibit, which dives deep into the history of songwriting and recorded music in the United States — as well as the Songwriters Hall of Fame and its inductees' role in it. Whether you're a songwriter or musician who loves the creative process, a history nerd, or simply a music lover, this exhibit is for you.

When you enter The Power Of Song, you'll hear the voices of legendary Songwriter Hall of Fame inductees and GRAMMY winners — including Nile Rodgers, Carole King, Diane Warren, Smokey Robinson and Jimmy Jam — discussing their creative process and some of the biggest songs they've written. Take a seat on the couch to absorb all their wisdom in the deeply informative and inspiring original short film.

Turn to the right, and you'll find a timeline across the entire wall, explaining the origins and key points around songwriting and recorded music in the U.S. On the other wall, pop on the headphones provided to enjoy a video of memorable Hall of Fame ceremony performances. One interactive video interface near the entrance allows you to hear "song highlights," and another allows you to explore the entire Songwriters Hall of Fame database.

The exhibit is filled with a treasure trove of handwritten song lyrics from Taylor Swift, Cyndi Lauper, Tom Petty and many more, as well as iconic artifacts, including Daft Punk's helmets, a classy Nile Rodgers GRAMMY look, and guitars from Bill Withers, Tom Petty, John Mellencamp and Toby Keith.

Below, take a look at five things we learned from The Power Of Song: A Songwriters Hall Of Fame Exhibit, which will be at the GRAMMY Museum from April 26 through Sept. 4.

Daft Punk Rerecorded "Get Lucky" To Fit Nile Rodgers' Funky Guitar

Legendary funk pioneer and superproducer Nile Rodgers is the current Chairman of the SHOF and has an active presence at the exhibit. One case features the disco-esque lime green Dior tuxedo Rodgers wore to the 2023 GRAMMY Awards, along with the shiny metallic helmets of French dance duo Daft Punk, who collaborated with Rodgers on their GRAMMY-winning 2013 album, Random Access Memories.

Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo of Daft Punk and Rodgers had forged a friendship and been wanting to collab for years prior to 2013's Record Of The Year-winning smash "Get Lucky." When they finally connected and Bangalter and de Homem-Christo played the CHIC founder the demo for "Get Lucky," he asked to hear it again with everything muted except the drum track, so he could create the perfect guitar lick for it.

Bangalter and de Homem-Christo decided to essentially re-record the whole song to fit Rodgers' guitar, which joyously drives the track — and carried it to No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, Daft Punk's first Top 5 hit.

Nile Rodgers Display at GRAMMY Museum

Photo: Rebecca Sapp

Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis Set Up Their Studio The "Wrong" Way Because Of Prince

In the exhibit film, Jimmy Jam tells several stories about working with — and learning from — Prince. He recalls how he and Terry Lewis watched Prince work and record everything "in the red," so they set up their Minneapolis studio to follow his lead. A sound engineer told them it was too loud, but that ended up being the sound that artists like Janet Jackson and Usher came to them for. It was a "happy mistake," as Jam put it, that helped their legendary careers as a powerhouse production duo take off.

Prince's dogmatic, tireless work ethic also rubbed off on the powerhouse pair. One rehearsal, the Purple One kept pressing Jam to do more, which resulted in him playing two instruments, singing and hitting the choreography from behind his keyboard. "He saw that I could do more than I thought I could; he saw me better than I saw myself," he reflected.

"God Bless America" Composer Irving Berlin Didn't Read Music

In his 50 year-career, Irving Berlin wrote over 1000 songs, many of which defined American popular music for the better part of the 20th century. Along with penning "God Bless America," "White Christmas," "Puttin' on the Ritz," and "There's No Business Like Show Business" (among many other classics), he wrote 17 full Broadway musical scores and contributed songs to six more plays.

Berlin also wrote scores for early Hollywood musicals starring the likes of Ginger Rodgers, Fred Astaire, Marilyn Monroe, and Bing Crosby. He made a lasting, indelible mark on music, theater, film and American culture writ large.

Rather astonishingly, the widely celebrated American Tin Pan Alley-era composer was self-taught and didn't read sheet music. His family immigrated to New York from Imperial Russia when he was 5 years old, and when he was just 13, his father died, so he busked on the streets and worked as a singing waiter to help his family out.

In 1907, at 19, he had his first song published, and just four years later penned his first international hit, "Alexander's Ragtime Band." Berlin had a natural musicality and played music by ear in the key of F-sharp, with the help of his trusted upright transposing piano, a rare instrument that had a mechanism allowing him to shift into different keys. His "trick piano," as he called it, where many of his unforgettable songs first came to life, is on display at the exhibit.

Read More: GRAMMY Rewind: Smokey Robinson Accepts A GRAMMY On Behalf Of The Temptations In 1973

Smokey Robinson Didn't Expect "My Girl" To Become A Timeless Hit

Smokey Robinson was an important part of Motown's hit-making factory as a singer, songwriter and producer. In the exhibit film, he discusses "My Girl," one of his classic tunes, which he wrote and produced for the Temptations in 1965.

"I had no idea it would become what it would become," he said.

He says that people often ask him why he didn't record the unforgettable song with his group the Miracles instead of "giving it away" to the Temptations, but he never regretted his decision. Instead, he's honored to have created music that stands the test of time and means so much to so many people.

Robinson joked that the Temptations' then-lead singer David Ruffin's gruff voice scared girls into going out with him. Really, he loved Ruffin's voice, and thought he'd sound great singing a sweet love song like "My Girl." Safe to say he was right.

After World War II, Pop Music Changed Forever

Prior to World War II, American music operated as a singular mainstream market, and New York's Tin Pan Alley songwriters competed to make the next pop or Broadway hit. In a post-World War II America, especially when the early Baby Boomer generation became teenagers and young adults in the '60s and '70s, tastes changed and new styles of pop and pop songwriting emerged. As rock shook up popular culture, Tin Pan Alley gave way to a new era of young songwriters, many who worked out of just two buildings in midtown Manhattan, 1619 Broadway (the Brill Building) and 1650 Broadway.

In this richly creative and collaborative environment, powerhouse songwriting duos began to emerge and reshape pop music, challenging and balancing each other — and creating a ton of hits in the process. The hit-making duos of this diversified pop era included Burt Bacharach and Hal David (Dionne Warrick's "That's What Friends Are For"), Carole King and Gerry Goffin (Little Eva's "The Loco-Motion"), Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil (the Righteous Brothers' "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'") and Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich (the Ronettes' "Be My Baby" and the Crystals' "Then He Kissed Me," both in collaboration with Phil Spector). In fact, there are far too many classics penned by these four prolific songwriter duos to list here.

While there are still songwriters that pen big hit after hit for pop stars (Max Martin is still at it, as is his protege Oscar Görres), the dynamics in the industry have continued to shift with singers taking on more creative power themselves. Today's pop stars — including Ariana Grande, Dua Lipa and Taylor Swift — have found success co-writing with their own trusted teams of songwriters and producers. But as this new exhibit shows, it doesn't matter who is behind the pen — the power of song is mighty.

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