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ReImagined At Home: Mark Caplice Flips Fleetwood Mac's GRAMMY-Nominated "The Chain" Into A Haunting Piano Ballad
Mark Caplice

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ReImagined At Home: Mark Caplice Flips Fleetwood Mac's GRAMMY-Nominated "The Chain" Into A Haunting Piano Ballad

Mark Caplice's slowed-down, piano-led version of "The Chain" captures all the emotion of Fleetwood Mac's original version from 1977, but applies a melancholy new treatment to the song.

GRAMMYs/Sep 6, 2022 - 06:58 pm

Singer/songwriter Mark Caplice puts a haunting and melancholy spin on a rock classic with his rendition of "The Chain," a Fleetwood Mac song originally released in 1977 as part of their classic album Rumours.

Rumours earned Fleetwood Mac a GRAMMY for Album Of The Year at the 1978 GRAMMY Awards. Two decades later, "The Chain" got some love at the ceremony once again: A live version of the track, off their live album The Dance, was nominated for a golden gramophone for Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal.

It's a credit to "The Chain" that different kinds of versions of the song have been successful, and in this episode of Reimagined at Home, Caplice once again proves the versatility of the solidarity anthem with his piano-led performance — one that highlights the song's eerie side.

Caplice's smooth, honeyed vocals lend extra weight and emotional power to his version of the song, but at the heart of his performance is a piano line that, from the very first bars of the song, sets a somber and dramatic tone that perfectly harmonizes with the aesthetic of the original.

As Caplice delivers his rendition of "The Chain" at his piano, a horn section enters the soundfield, underscoring the cinematic vibe of the composition.

Fleetwood Mac created the original version of the song by splicing together sections of previously recorded material — including some that various bandmates recorded solo — This meant that much of the music was recorded at different times and in different locations, without the finished product in mind.

In contrast, Caplice's version brings the musicians together in one room for their live performance, proving once again that a truly great song will always stand tall, no matter what format an artist uses to bring it to life.

Check out Caplice's performance in the video above, and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more episodes of ReImagined at Home.

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ReImagined At Home: Watch Ant Clemons Croon The Cosmic Blues In Performance Of Bill Withers' "Ain't No Sunshine"

Ant Clemons

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ReImagined At Home: Watch Ant Clemons Croon The Cosmic Blues In Performance Of Bill Withers' "Ain't No Sunshine"

Singer/songwriter Ant Clemons puts his own spin on Bill Withers' immortal "Ain't No Sunshine" in an exclusive performance for ReImagined At Home.

GRAMMYs/Jun 15, 2021 - 08:13 pm

Why has Bill Withers' immortal hit, "Ain't No Sunshine," endured for decades? And, furthermore, why does it seem set to reverberate throughout the ages?

Could it be because it's blues-based? Because it's relatable to anyone with a pulse? Because virtually anyone with an ounce of zeal can believably yowl the song at karaoke?

Maybe it's for all of those reasons and one more: "Ain't No Sunshine" is flexible

In the latest episode of ReImagined At Home, check out how singer/songwriter Ant Clemons pulls at the song's edges like taffy. With a dose of vocoder and slapback, Clemons recasts the lonesome-lover blues as the lament of a shipwrecked android.

Giving this oft-covered soul classic a whirl, Clemons reminds music lovers exactly why Withers' signature song has staying power far beyond his passing in 2020. It will probably be a standard in 4040, too.

Check out Ant Clemons' cosmic, soulful performance of "Ain't No Sunshine" above and click here to enjoy more episodes of ReImagined At Home.

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Poll: From "Dreams" To "The Chain," Which Fleetwood Mac Song Is Your Favorite?

Fleetwood Mac in 1975

Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

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Poll: From "Dreams" To "The Chain," Which Fleetwood Mac Song Is Your Favorite?

"Dreams" experienced a charming viral moment on TikTok after a man posted a video skateboarding to the classic track, and now it's back on the charts, 43 years later

GRAMMYs/Oct 16, 2020 - 04:00 am

In honor of Fleetwood Mac's ethereal '70s rock classic "Dreams," which recently returned to the Billboard Hot 100 thanks to a viral TikTok skateboard video from Nathan Apodaca, we want to know which of the legendary group's songs is your favorite!

Beyond their ubiquitous 1977 No. 1 hit "Dreams," there are so many other gems from the iconic GRAMMY-winning album Rumours, as well as across their entire catalog. There's the oft-covered sentimental ballad "Landslide" from their 1975 self-titled album, the jubilant, sparkling Tango in the Night cut "Everywhere" and Stevie Nicks' triumphant anthem for the people "Gypsy," from 1982's Mirage, among many others.

Vote below in our latest GRAMMY.com poll to let us know which you love most.

Related: Fleetwood Mac's "Dreams" Back On Charts Thanks To Viral Skateboard Video On TikTok

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Poll: What's Your Favorite Van Halen Song?

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Stars Align On Capitol Hill

Music at presidential inaugurations provides entertainment and unifying moments of patriotism

GRAMMYs/Dec 3, 2014 - 05:06 am

(On Jan. 21 President Barack Obama will be inaugurated into his second term as president of the United States with a celebration in Washington, D.C., featuring performances by GRAMMY winners Beyoncé, Alicia Keys, Kelly Clarkson, Brad Paisley, Usher, and Stevie Wonder, among others. This feature is taken from the fall 2012 issue of GRAMMY magazine and offers a brief history of notable musical performances at past presidential inaugurations.) 

Being elected the leader of the free world is a pretty good reason to strike up the band. Ever since George Washington first danced a celebratory minuet after his inauguration in 1789, music has played an ever-increasing role in the gala events surrounding presidential inaugurations.

In 1801 Thomas Jefferson had the U.S. Marines band play him along as he made his way from the Capitol to the White House after taking the oath of office. James and Dolley Madison threw the first official inaugural ball in 1809. Jumping to the 20th century, in 1977 Jimmy Carter invited such music luminaries as John Lennon and Yoko Ono to his inaugural ball and allowed rock and roll — or at least the Southern rock variety — to become a part of his inauguration backdrop when he invited the Marshall Tucker Band and the Charlie Daniels Band to share a concert bill with Guy Lombardo And His Royal Canadians. (Lombardo's group was something of an inauguration ball house band, having played for seven presidents.) 

Today, inaugurations are presented as both massive public live events and televised productions, complete with a concert featuring a roster of star talent. The musical performances at inaugurations not only provide entertainment, they also help set the tone for a new presidency and bring the country together in a unifying moment of patriotism over partisanship.

"It wasn't about one side or the other. We just had this overwhelming feeling of being proud to be American," recalls Ronnie Dunn, formerly of the GRAMMY-winning duo Brooks & Dunn. He and then-partner Kix Brooks performed their hit "Only In America" at a concert as part of George W. Bush's first inauguration in 2001.

"Right away you could feel it was an emotionally charged crowd, and when you're standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial looking across to the Washington Monument, you can't help but tear up a little," says Brooks. "I remember there was this chaos during the big encore when all the musicians and all the presidential VIPs were onstage together. I turned around and there's Colin Powell shaking my hand. It turned into one of the wildest photo ops ever because all the music people and all the political people were pulling their cameras out to take pictures of each other."

One of the most memorable unions of political and musical star power at an inaugural gala occurred in 1993, when a reunited Fleetwood Mac performed "Don't Stop," a hit from their GRAMMY-winning album Rumours, for President-elect Bill Clinton. Clinton had used "Don't Stop" as the theme song to his presidential campaign, but the payoff live performance almost didn't happen.

"At that point we were as broken up as we'd ever been," says Stevie Nicks. "When our management received the request for us to play, they said, 'No.' I heard about that and thought to myself, 'I don't want to be 90, looking back and trying to remember why my group couldn't play the president's favorite song for him.' I told management to let me handle it." 

Nicks successfully coaxed her bandmates into a one-night, one-song reunion, a performance she remembers as truly exceptional.

"For one thing we'd never seen security like that," she says. "The Secret Service makes rock and roll security feel like a bunch of grade school hall monitors. But the performance felt really important. It felt like we were a part of history, and that the song itself was becoming a piece of American history. It was a fantastic night in all of our lives, and I'm really glad the band was able to come together for that one."

The Beach Boys played Ronald Reagan's second inauguration after a somewhat confused relationship with the White House. The band had headlined a series of Fourth of July concerts at the National Mall until 1983, when U.S. Secretary of the Interior James Watt accused the group of attracting "the wrong element" and booked Wayne Newton in their place. Watt later apologized, and the Beach Boys were reinstated and invited to play Reagan's inaugural gala in 1985.

"What I remember most about that night is that I got to meet Elizabeth Taylor," says Jerry Schilling, the band's then-manager. "But I also remember being extremely proud of the group. Things had been hard for Brian [Wilson], and the group wasn't always getting along. But they stood there together in front of the president and sang perfect five-part a capella harmony on 'Their Hearts Were Full Of Spring.' It was a big moment — we all felt that. It wasn't just another gig. The guys were truly honored to be there and they brought it when it mattered."

A new musical standard for inaugural events may have been established in 2009 when Barack Obama's presidency was kicked off with the "We Are One" concert. The patriotic spectacular featured a who's who of performers ranging from Pete Seeger, Bruce Springsteen and U2 to Usher, Sheryl Crow and will.i.am. An all-star lineup usually adds an all-star production element, but this particular concert was unique.

"Dealing with top artists, there's usually a lot of negotiating," says Don Mischer, one of the concert's producers, whose list of credits also includes Super Bowl halftime shows and Olympics ceremonies. "Who needs a private jet? How much does their 'glam squad' cost? What kind of security do they need? Putting together 'We Are One,' we said to every artist, 'This is a historical moment we'd love for you to be a part of, but you have to pay your own way and take care of your own security.' Right away, people like Beyoncé and Bono and Springsteen and Stevie Wonder all said, 'Yes.' They wanted to be there. There was a true camaraderie right from the start, and it turned out to be one of the greatest experiences any of us have ever had."

While Washington's minuet may have simply been a matter of dancing, Mischer says music has become as powerful a symbol of America as any other part of Inauguration Day.

"When you bring the music and the significance of an event like this together, it really reflects the strength of our cultural diversity and the strength of our country," he says. "In fact, at times when we seem to be going through confrontational political campaigns, I wish we would listen to the music a little more."

(Chuck Crisafulli is an L.A.-based journalist and author whose most recent works include Go To Hell: A Heated History Of The Underworld, Me And A Guy Named Elvis and Elvis: My Best Man.)

ReImagined At Home: OHNO Sets The Mood With A Laid-Back, Tropical Cover Of Khalid's GRAMMY-Nominated "Location"
OHNO

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ReImagined At Home: OHNO Sets The Mood With A Laid-Back, Tropical Cover Of Khalid's GRAMMY-Nominated "Location"

OHNO brings dreamy weekend vibes and his trademark, relaxed vocal flow to his rendition of "Location," which was Khalid's debut single in 2016 and earned a GRAMMY nomination for Best R&B Song.

GRAMMYs/Oct 4, 2022 - 02:23 pm

Rising rapper and singer OHNO is known for pairing a relaxed, smooth vocal delivery with introspective and often melancholy subject matter — and both skills serve him well in his brooding cover performance of Khalid's hit debut single, "Location."

In this episode of ReImagined at Home, OHNO performs the song in an indoor setting, sitting on a black couch decorated with gold striped pillows. Wearing shades and a ball cap, he sings into a microphone, with a sparse background track that keeps the focus on his smooth, buttery vocals.

Visuals are important to this performance: The living space surrounding OHNO conjures up loosely tropical, laid-back vibes, complete with lush houseplants, an ornate, art deco-style piece of gold wall decor and a matching figurine of what appears to be a leopard on the prowl. The lights are off, but daylight streams through the window, creating the impression of a lazy weekend alone in an apartment.

It's a fitting video to go along with a performance of "Location," an angsty song about the feverish early stages of falling in love, and the urgency — and insecurity — that goes along with it.

Khalid first recorded the song for his 2017 American Teen album, and it helped him snag one of his five GRAMMY nominations during the following ceremony: "Location" earned a GRAMMY nomination for Best R&B Song at the 2018 GRAMMYs.

At the same show, Khalid was nominated for Best New Artist, and American Teen was in the running for a GRAMMY for Best Urban Contemporary Album. He was also nominated for GRAMMYs for Best Music Video and Song Of The Year — both for his feature on Logic and Juanes' "1-800-273-8255."

Press play on the video above to watch OHNO's version of "Location," and keep checking back to GRAMMY.com for more new episodes of ReImagined At Home.

ReImagined At Home: Mark Caplice Flips Fleetwood Mac's GRAMMY-Nominated "The Chain" Into A Haunting Piano Ballad