Adele to Ziggy Marley: Do You Know These 15 Facts About 59th GRAMMY Winners?

Beyoncé, Carol Burnett, Chance The Rapper, Vince Gill, Megadeth, Maren Morris, Pentatonix, Bobby Rush, Solange, and Star Wars also featured in our roundup of 59th GRAMMY winner facts you need to know
  • Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage.com
    Adele
  • Photo: Randy Shropshire/WireImage.com
    Chance The Rapper
  • Photo: Rich Polk/WireImage.com
    Flume
  • Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images
    Megadeth
  • Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage.com
    Beyoncé
  • Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images
    Solange
  • Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage.com
    Maren Morris
  • Photo: John Shearer/WireImage.com
    Pentatonix
  • Photo: Rich Polk/WireImage.com
    Kirk Franklin
  • Photo: Dan MacMedan/WireImage.com
    Hillary Scott
  • Photo: Rich Polk/WireImage.com
    Vince Gill
  • Photo: Randy Shropshire/WireImage.com
    Bobby Rush
  • Photo: Rich Polk/WireImage.com
    Ziggy Marley
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February 14, 2017 -- 3:24 pm PST
GRAMMY.com

Music fans likely know something about the winning artists and recordings that were recognized at this year's 59th GRAMMY Awards. But with 84 categories, spanning the General Field to Music Video/Film, there's a lot of GRAMMY ground to cover. From first-time winners and historic sweeps to family feats and Star Wars joining elite soundtrack company, we've dissected the winners list to bring you 15 under-the-radar facts about select members of the class of 59th GRAMMY winners. May the facts be with you.

Adele

Adele made GRAMMY history by becoming the first artist to sweep Record and Song ("Hello") Of The Year and Album Of The Year (25) twice. She previously won the three awards for 2011: Record and Song Of The Year for "Rolling In The Deep" and Album Of The Year for (21). Additionally, Adele became the second female solo artist to win Album Of The Year twice, following Taylor Swift (Fearless, 1989). (Lauryn Hill, Norah Jones and Alison Krauss have each won Album Of The Year twice, but only once, in each case, for their own albums.)

Adele: Humbled By GRAMMY Wins, Devastated By George Michael Do-Over

Adele interviewed backstage after winning five awards at the 59th GRAMMYs on Feb. 12, 2017, at Staples Center in Los Angeles. The 15-time GRAMMY winner discusses her historic night, her George Michael tribute on the 59th GRAMMY telecast, her respect for fellow nominee Beyoncé and her album Lemonade, and the creative process behind her Album Of The Year-winning 25.

Chance The Rapper

Among his three GRAMMY wins, Chance The Rapper became the first male rap solo artist to win Best New Artist. The three prior rap acts to win are Arrested Development (1992), Lauryn Hill (1998) and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis (2013). Chance The Rapper, 23, wasn't even born in 1989 when Tone-Loc became the first rap artist to receive a nomination in this category.

Flume

First-time GRAMMY winner Flume became the first Australian artist to win Best Dance/Electronic Album, which dates back to 2004. Skin, the Sydney native's winning album, features collaborations with fellow GRAMMY winner Beck, among others.

David Bowie

The late icon was recognized with four posthumous GRAMMYs: Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical and Best Alternative Music Album for Blackstar and Best Rock Performance and Best Rock Song for the title track. Bowie's 59th GRAMMY wins mark the second-most posthumous win total for an artist. Following his death in 2004, Ray Charles earned five awards for Genius Loves Company at the 47th GRAMMYs.

Megadeth

Megadeth won their first career GRAMMY for Best Metal Performance for the title track to their 2016 studio album, Dystopia. The veteran metal band received 11 prior GRAMMY nominations. "Wow! Fantastic. It only took 12 tries to get this," quipped Megadeth founder Dave Mustaine during his acceptance speech.

Megadeth Win Best Metal Performance GRAMMY

Megadeth's acceptance speech for Best Metal Performance at the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony on Feb. 12, 2017, in Los Angeles.

Beyoncé And Solange

The Knowles siblings became the first sisters in GRAMMY history to win separate categories within the R&B Field in the same year. Solange took home her first career GRAMMY for Best R&B Performance for "Cranes In The Sky" while Beyoncé's Lemonade won Best Urban Contemporary Album. Queen Bey, who now has 22 GRAMMY wins, inched her way up the list of the top GRAMMY winners of all time.

Watch: Solange Interviewed Backstage After Winning First GRAMMY

Maren Morris

It was a night of firsts for Maren Morris. Not only did she make her GRAMMY performance debut with Alicia Keys, she won her first GRAMMY for Best Country Solo Performance, making her the first GRAMMY Camp alumnus to win a GRAMMY. "Eleven years ago, I went to the first-ever GRAMMY Camp," said Morris during her acceptance. "It was the first time I ever flew on a plane by myself to L.A. and it's crazy to be here a decade later." Applications are now open for 2017 GRAMMY Camp, a nonresidential music industry camp for high school students.

Maren Morris Wins Best Country Solo Performance GRAMMY

Maren Morris' acceptance speech for Best Country Solo Performance at the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards on Feb. 12, 2017, at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Pentatonix And Dolly Parton

The vocal quintet earned their third career GRAMMY for Best Country Duo/Group Performance for "Jolene" with country legend Dolly Parton, who is now an eight-time GRAMMY winner. This marks Pentatonix's first GRAMMY win outside of the Composing/Arranging Field. Their two prior wins were for the Best Arrangement, Instrumental Or A Cappella category. Parton's original recording of "Jolene" was inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame in 2014.

Watch: Pentatonix Perform The Jackson 5's "ABC" At The 59th GRAMMYs

Kirk Franklin

Kirk Franklin is the first artist to win twice in the Best Gospel Album category, which dates to 2011. He won this year for Losing My Religion; he earned the 2011 award for Hello Fear.

Hillary Scott

Hillary Scott, who has won seven GRAMMYs as a member of Lady Antebellum, won two awards for her family project, Hillary Scott & The Scott Family. Scott is the first Lady A member to earn a GRAMMY outside of the group. Love Remains captured Best Contemporary Christian Music Album while "Thy Will," a track from the album, took Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song honors.

Vince Gill

Vince Gill's "Kid Sister," a song written for his Time Jumpers ensemble, won in the American Roots Music Field for Best American Roots Song. Now with 21 GRAMMYs to his credit, this year's win marks Gill's first outside of the Country Field. Gill is among the top GRAMMY winners of all time.

Bobby Rush And Carol Burnett

A blues legend and a television luminary each won their first career GRAMMY at age 83. Bobby Rush (born Nov. 10, 1933) won for Best Traditional Blues Album for Porcupine Meat. The third nomination was the charm for Carol Burnett (born April 26, 1933), who won for Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling) for In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox.

Ziggy Marley

The reggae singer/songwriter won his seventh award in the Best Reggae Album category for his album Ziggy Marley, and eighth career GRAMMY overall. He ties his brother Stephen for the most wins by a Marley family member.

Watch: Ziggy Marley Performs "Amen" At The GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

John Williams, also one of the top winners in GRAMMY history, won his 23rd career GRAMMY for Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media for Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Williams has now won three GRAMMYs for his work on Star Wars films. Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back won awards for 1977 and 1980, respectively. The Star Wars franchise is now tied with The Lord Of The Rings franchise for spawning the most winning soundtracks (three) in this category, which dates back to 1959.

The Beatles

The Beatles: Eight Days A Week The Touring Years took home Best Music Film honors, giving Oscar-winning director Ron Howard his first GRAMMY win. It is the third Beatles-related film to win in this category (or its predecessor category, Best Music Video, Long Form). The Beatles Anthology won for 1996; The Beatles Love—All Together Now won for 2009.

Bonus: More First-Time GRAMMY Winners

Aside from the individuals referenced above, the 59th GRAMMY Awards minted many other first-time GRAMMY winners, including William Bell, Cage The Elephant, the Chainsmokers, Daya, Sarah Jarosz, Joey+RoryJesse & Joy, O'Connor Band With Mark O'Connor, Patton Oswalt, Secret Agent 23 Skidoo, Sturgill Simpson, and Twenty One Pilots.

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