Winners

28th Annual GRAMMY Awards (1985)

There was no sign declaring “Check Your Ego At The Door” before the 28th Annual GRAMMY Awards ceremony, but USA For Africa, the historic all-star benefit for African relief, enjoyed Record Of The Year, Song Of The Year, Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal and Best Music Video, Short Form, awards for “We Are The World.” However, this wide-ranging GRAMMY show began on a different, more somber musical and political note with Sting appearing in a tux before an orchestra to perform his Cold War commentary “Russians,” complete with its famous lyric, “I hope the Russians love their children too.”

Host Kenny Rogers, turning out in a rhinestone tux, noted that the past year wasn’t the first time the music industry had expressed its social conscience, before introducing a performance by one of the artists who ruled the mid-’80s, Phil Collins. Soon after, James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt presented Collins with the GRAMMY Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male, for his No Jacket Required album. Collins’ other awards for the night were Album Of The Year and Producer Of The Year (with his then collaborator Hugh Padgham). Then Dionne Warwick — along with Julian Lennon — presented the Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, to her niece Whitney Houston for “Saving All My Love For You.”

Accepting the Song Of The Year, reigning King of Pop Michael Jackson struck a grand note, saying, “I’d like to thank God…for choosing [co-writer] Lionel [Richie] and I to write ‘We Are the World.’”

Barbra Streisand offered a heartfelt presentation of a posthumous Trustees Award to the legendary songwriting team of George and Ira Gershwin. “Like the love in the last song they ever wrote together, their music is definitely here to stay,” Streisand noted, before Ira Gershwin’s widow, Leonore, graciously accepted the award.

Ronnie Milsap’s big country hit “Lost In The Fifties Tonight (In The Still Of The Night)” — which would win the GRAMMY for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male — became the jumping off point for an ambitious ’50s medley that featured Milsap, Fred Parris and the Five Satins, Carl Perkins and Huey Lewis & The News.

A salute to the Rolling Stones began with Kenny Rogers singing their praises, saying “They set a tone for rock music for the next generation that made it okay to play from your heart...and sometimes even lower.” Then Eric Clapton appeared via satellite with the Stones from the Roof Garden Club in London. “As far as I’m concerned, they are what rock and roll is all about — toughness and relentless to the very end,” Clapton said. Slowhand then presented the band with the Lifetime Achievement Award, noting they were “the most volatile and intact rock group to survive the ’60s. The band seemed to be having a very good night indeed, and Mick Jagger offered these words: “I’d like to say thank you to all the people that have stuck by this band through thick and thin. And to all the people that took the piss, the joke’s on you.”

The final award of the evening was Record Of The Year, and in accepting for “We Are The World,” producer Quincy Jones made reference to that famous “Check Your Ego At The Door” sign outside the recording sessions for the song. “It was never necessary,” Jones said warmly. And then he set the stage for many more such high-minded musical efforts in the future, saying, “I hope it becomes fashionable.” 

Record Of The Year
 
winner
Quincy Jones, GRAMMY winner
We Are The World

Quincy Jones, producer.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
No Jacket Required

Phil Collins, artist. Hugh Padgham & Phil Collins, producers.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Michael Jackson, GRAMMY winner
We Are The World

Lionel Richie & Michael Jackson, songwriters.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Whitney Houston, GRAMMY winner
Saving All My Love For You

Whitney Houston, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
No Jacket Required

Phil Collins, artist.

Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Quincy Jones, GRAMMY winner
We Are The World

Quincy Jones, producer.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group Or Soloist)
 
winner
Miami Vice Theme

Jan Hammer, artist.

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
One Of The Living

Tina Turner, artist.

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
The Boys Of Summer

Don Henley, artist.

Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Money For Nothing

Dire Straits (Alan Clark, Guy Fletcher, John Illsley, Mark Knopfler, Terry Williams), artist.

Best Rock Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group Or Soloist)
 
winner
Jeff Beck, GRAMMY winner
Escape

Jeff Beck , artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Freeway Of Love

Aretha Franklin, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Stevie Wonder, GRAMMY winner
In Square Circle

Stevie Wonder, artist.

Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Nightshift

Commodores (William King, Ronald LaPread, J.D. Nichols, Walter Orange, Milan Williams), artist.

Best R&B Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group Or Soloist)
 
winner
Musician

Ernie Watts, artist.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Freeway Of Love

Jeffrey Cohen & Narada Michael Walden, songwriters.

Best Jazz Fusion Performance, Vocal Or Instrumental
 
winner
Straight To The Heart

David Sanborn, artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Cleo At Carnegie - The 10th Anniversary Concert

Cleo Laine, artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Another Night In Tunisia

Bobby McFerrin & Jon Hendricks, artists.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Duo Or Group
 
winner
Vocalese

Manhattan Transfer (Cheryl Bentyne, Tim Hauser, Alan Paul, Janis Siegel), artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Soloist
 
winner
Black Codes From The Underground

Wynton Marsalis, soloist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Group
 
winner
Black Codes From The Underground

Wynton Marsalis, artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Big Band
 
winner
The Cotton Club - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Bob Wilber & John Barry, artists.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
I Don't Know Why You Don't Want Me

Rosanne Cash, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Lost In The Fifties Tonight (In The Still Of The Night)

Ronnie Milsap, artist.

Best Country Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Why Not Me

Judds (Naomi Judd, Wynonna Judd), artist.

Best Country Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group Or Soloist)
 
winner
Cosmic Square Dance

Chet Atkins & Mark Knopfler, artists.

Best Country Song
 
winner
Highwayman

Jimmy L. Webb, songwriter.

Best Gospel Performance, Female
 
winner
Unguarded

Amy Grant, artist.

Best Gospel Performance, Male
 
winner
How Excellent Is Thy Name

Larnelle Harris, artist.

Best Gospel Performance By A Duo Or Group, Choir Or Chorus
 
winner
I've Just Seen Jesus

Larnelle Harris & Sandi Patti, artists.

Best Soul Gospel Performance, Female
 
Best Soul Gospel Performance, Male
 
winner
Bring Back The Days Of Yea And Nay

Marvin Winans, artist.

Best Soul Gospel Performance By A Duo, Group, Choir Or Chorus
 
winner
Tomorrow

Winans (Carvin Winans, Marvin Winans, Michael Winans, Ronald Winans), artist.

Best Inspirational Performance
 
winner
Come Sunday

Jennifer Holliday, artist.

Best Latin Pop Performance
 
winner
Es Facil Amar

Lani Hall, artist.

Best Tropical Latin Performance
 
winner
Mambo Diablo

Tito Puente, artist. (TIE)

winner
Solito

Eddie Palmieri, artist. (TIE)

Best Mexican-American Performance
 
winner
Simplemente Mujer

Vikki Carr, artist.

Best Traditional Blues Recording
 
winner
B.B. King, GRAMMY winner
My Guitar Sings The Blues

B.B. King, artist.

Best Ethnic Or Traditional Folk Recording
 
winner
My Toot Toot

Rockin' Sidney, artist.

Best Polka Recording
 
winner
70 Years Of Hits

Frank Yankovic, artist.

Best Reggae Recording
 
winner
Cliff Hanger

Jimmy Cliff, artist.

Best Recording For Children
 
winner
Follow That Bird - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Jim Henson & Steve Buckingham, producers.

Best Comedy Recording
 
winner
Whoopi Goldberg - Original Broadway Show Recording

Whoopi Goldberg, artist.

Best Spoken Word Or Non-Musical Recording
 
winner
Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

Mike Berniker, producer.

Best Music Video, Short Form
 
winner
Quincy Jones, GRAMMY winner
We Are The World - The Video Event

Tom Trbovich, video director. Quincy Jones, video producer.

Best Music Video, Long Form
 
winner
Huey Lewis & The News - The Heart Of Rock 'n' Roll

Huey Lewis And The News (Mario Cipollina, John Colla, Bill Gibson, Chris Hayes, Sean Hopper, Huey Lewis), artist. Bruce Gowers, video director.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
Miami Vice Theme

Jan Hammer, composer.

Best Album Of Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special
 
winner
Beverly Hills Cop

Allee Willis, Bunny Hull, Dan Sembello, Harold Faltermeyer, Hawk, Howard Hewett, Howie Rice, Jon Gilutin, Keith Forsey, Marc Benno, Micki Free, Richard C. Theisen II, Sharon Robinson & Sue Sheridan, composers.

Best Cast Show Album
 
winner
West Side Story

John McClure, producer.

Best Arrangement On An Instrumental
 
winner
Early A.M. Attitude

Dave Grusin & Lee Ritenour, arrangers.

Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s)
 
winner
Lush Life

Nelson Riddle, arranger.

Best Vocal Arrangement For Two Or More Voices
 
winner
Another Night In Tunisia

Bobby McFerrin & Cheryl Bentyne, arrangers.

Best Album Package
 
winner
Lush Life

John Kosh & Ron Larson, art directors.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Sam Cooke Live At The Harlem Square Club, 1963

Peter Guralnick, album notes writer.

Best Historical Album
 
winner
RCA/Met - 100 Singers - 100 Years

John Pfeiffer, producer.

Best Engineered Recording - Non Classical
 
winner
Brothers In Arms

Neil Dorfsman, engineer.

Producer Of The Year (Non-Classical)
 
winner
Phil Collins & Hugh Padgham
Best Classical Album
 
winner
Robert Woods, GRAMMY winner
Berlioz: Requiem

John Aler & Robert Shaw, artists. Robert Woods, producer.

Best Classical Orchestral Recording
 
winner
Robert Woods, GRAMMY winner
Faure: Pelleas Et Melisande

Robert Shaw, conductor. Robert Woods, producer.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Georg Solti, GRAMMY winner
Schoenberg: Moses Und Aron

Franz Mazura & Philip Langridge, artists. Georg Solti, conductor. James Mallinson, producer.

Best Choral Performance (Other Than Opera)
 
winner
Berlioz: Requiem

Robert Shaw, conductor.

Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Yo-Yo Ma, GRAMMY winner
Elgar: Cello Concerto, Op. 85/Walton: Concerto For Cello & Orch.

Yo-Yo Ma, artist.

Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
Ravel: Gaspard De La Nuit; Pavane Pour Une Infante Defunte; Valses Nobles Et Sentimentales

Vladimir Ashkenazy, artist.

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Yo-Yo Ma, GRAMMY winner
Brahms: Cello And Piano Sonatas In E Minor And F

Emanuel Ax & Yo-Yo Ma, artists.

Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
 
winner
Berlioz: Requiem

John Aler, artist.

Best New Classical Artist
 
winner
Stravinsky: L' Histoire Du Soldat (The Soldier's Tale - Suite) - (also) - Walton: Façade (An Instrumental Suite In The Original Scoring)

Chicago Pro Musica, artist.

Best Contemporary Composition
 
winner
Lloyd Webber: Requiem

Andrew Lloyd Webber, composer.

Best Engineered Recording, Classical
 
winner
Berlioz: Requiem

Jack Renner, engineer.

Classical Producer Of The Year
 
winner
Robert Woods, GRAMMY winner
Robert Woods