Winners

23rd Annual GRAMMY Awards (1980)

The first GRAMMY show honoring the music of the ’80s (and the first ever held at New York’s famed Radio City Music Hall) was hosted by one of the most important singer/songwriters of the ’60s and ’70s, and all the years that have followed for that matter — Paul Simon. After slyly telling the Radio City crowd that both of his parents were Rockettes, Simon said, “I am very happy to be here. It’s not only a great honor to be asked, but I think it’s a very nice career move as well.”

Yet starting with the first award of the night presented on air, Best New Artist, it became clear that this night would belong, award-wise at least, to another singer/songwriter — a previously less heralded artist from Texas named Christopher Cross. At the time Cross was enjoying tremendous success with his 1980 debut album that featured such smashes as “Sailing,” “Ride Like The Wind” and “Never Be The Same.” And by the end of this GRAMMY night, the soft-spoken Texan would pick up five GRAMMY Awards including the so-called “Big Four” — Album Of The Year, Record Of The Year, Song Of The Year and Best New Artist. For the record, no artist thus far has repeated that achievement.

Standout performances varied widely on the show from Irene Cara’s opening rendition of “Fame,” which started outside of Radio City and found the singer and dancers working their way down the aisle to the stage, to George Jones’ short but heartbreaking rendition of the country classic “He Stopped Loving Her Today,” which earned a GRAMMY for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male. The night also featured a multiracial gospel supergroup (including the Archers, Andrae Crouch, Reba Rambo and B.J. Thomas) coming together to perform a kind of disco/gospel version of “The Lord’s Prayer” and Chuck Mangione and the Manhattan Transfer jazzing things up together on a medley of “Birdland” and “Give It All You Got.”

Appropriately enough Paul Simon played the stirring “Late In The Evening” late in the evening, and kept things moving along throughout in his own low-key and witty way. “Our next two presenters are not only great performers and legends in their own time, they’re also well-known bigots and drug abusers,” he announced at one point. Pausing for a big laugh, Simon then added, “I just wanted to say that as an introduction. Nobody ever gives that introduction actually.”

An even bigger laugh came from presenters Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb — winners in the Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal. Taking the stage, Streisand and Gibb, both dressed in white as on her hugely successful Guilty album cover, looked a little sheepish.

“Barry, do you feel guilty?” Streisand asked.

“No,” Gibb told her shyly.

“No?” she said. “I do.”

“Why?” Gibb asked her. “Why would you feel like that?”

“I don’t know — I feel like I’m cheating on Neil Diamond,” she said, referring to the man with whom she famously sang “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” on the 22nd GRAMMY Awards show.

The pair then presented Billy Joel with the GRAMMY for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male, for his Glass Houses album — a category in which his fellow nominees were Jackson Browne, Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen and Kenny Loggins. Phil Ramone — who had produced recent efforts by both Billy Joel and Paul Simon — won Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical. In his acceptance speech, Ramone took time to thank “my little Ramones...not the ones who make records — the other ones.”

One innovative moment came at the end of the show. Many years before shows like MTV’s “Unplugged” or VH1’s “Storytellers,” this GRAMMY show presented a group of songwriters nominated for Song Of The Year — including Amanda McBroom (“The Rose”), Christopher Cross (“Sailing”), Fred Ebb and John Kander (“New York, New York”), Dean Pitchford and Michael Gore (“Fame”), and Lionel Richie (“Lady”) — to both explain and perform stripped down versions of the songs. It was a vivid reminder of the power of the songwriter.

Finally, before closing the show, Paul Simon took the stage of Radio City to recall the impact of one of the greatest songwriters of all time — John Lennon, who had been killed outside New York’s Dakota apartments only months prior to the show. As Simon put it simply and powerfully, “We’ll miss his music, his humor and his common sense.”

Record Of The Year
 
winner
Sailing

Christopher Cross, artist. Michael Omartian, producer.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
Christopher Cross

Christopher Cross, artist. Michael Omartian, producer.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Sailing

Christopher Cross, songwriter.

Best New Artist
 
winner
Christopher Cross
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
The Rose

Bette Midler, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
This Is It

Kenny Loggins, artist.

Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Guilty

Barbra Streisand & Barry Gibb, artists.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
winner
One On One

Bob James & Earl Klugh, artists.

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Crimes Of Passion

Pat Benatar, artist.

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Glass Houses

Billy Joel, artist.

Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Against The Wind

Bob Seger And The Silver Bullet Band (Drew Abbott, Chris Campbell, Alto Reed, Bob Seger, David Teegarden), artist.

Best Rock Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Sting, GRAMMY winner
Reggatta De Blanc

Police (Stewart Copeland, Sting, Andy Summers), artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Never Knew Love Like This Before

Stephanie Mills, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Give Me The Night

George Benson, artist.

Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Shining Star

Manhattans (Gerald Alston, Sonny Bevens, Kenneth Kelley, Winfred "Blue" Lovett), artist.

Best R&B Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Off Broadway

George Benson, artist.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Never Knew Love Like This Before

James Mtume & Reggie Lucas, songwriters.

Best Jazz Fusion Performance, Vocal Or Istrumental
 
winner
Birdland

Manhattan Transfer (Cheryl Bentyne, Tim Hauser, Alan Paul, Janis Siegel), artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Could I Have This Dance?

Anne Murray, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
He Stopped Loving Her Today

George Jones, artist.

Best Country Performance Duo Or Group
 
winner
Emmylou Harris, GRAMMY winner
That Lovin' You Feelin' Again

Emmylou Harris & Roy Orbison, artists.

Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Orange Blossom Special/Hoedown

Gilley's Urban Cowboy Band (Mickey Gilley), artist.

Best Country Song
 
winner
Willie Nelson
On The Road Again

Willie Nelson, songwriter.

Best Gospel Performance, Contemporary Or Inspirational
 
winner
The Lord's Prayer

Andrae Crouch, Archers (Janice Archer, Steve Archer, Tim Archer), B.J. Thomas, Cynthia Clawson, Dony McGuire, Reba Rambo, Tramaine Hawkins & Walter Hawkins, artists.

Best Gospel Performance, Traditional
 
winner
We Come To Worship

Blackwood Brothers (Cecil Blackwood, James Blackwood Jr., James Blackwood Sr., Tommy Fairchild, Pat Hoffmaster, Ken Turner), artist.

Best Soul Gospel Performance, Contemporary
 
winner
Shirley Caesar, GRAMMY winner
Rejoice

Shirley Caesar, artist.

Best Soul Gospel Performance, Traditional
 
winner
Lord, Let Me Be An Instrument

Charles Fold Singers & James Cleveland, artists.

Best Inspirational Performance
 
winner
With My Song I Will Praise Him

Debby Boone, artist.

Best Ethnic Or Traditional Recording
 
winner
Rare Blues

Norman Dayron, producer.

Best Latin Recording
 
winner
La Onda Va Bien

Cal Tjader, artist.

Best Recording For Children
 
winner
In Harmony/A Sesame Street Record

David Levine & Lucy Simon, producers.

Best Comedy Recording
 
winner
No Respect

Rodney Dangerfield, artist.

Best Spoken Word, Documentary Or Drama
 
winner
Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein

Pat Carroll, narrator.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
John Williams, GRAMMY winner
The Empire Strikes Back

John Williams, composer.

Best Album Of Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special
 
winner
John Williams, GRAMMY winner
The Empire Strikes Back

John Williams, composer.

Best Cast Show Album
 
winner
Evita - Premier American Recording

Andrew Lloyd Webber, composer. Tim Rice, lyricist. Andrew Lloyd Webber & Tim Rice, producers.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Ella Fitzgerald, GRAMMY winner
A Perfect Match - Ella And Basie

Ella Fitzgerald, artist.

Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
Moody's Mood

George Benson, artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Soloist
 
winner
I Will Say Goodbye

Bill Evans, soloist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Group
 
winner
We Will Meet Again

Bill Evans, artist.

Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Big Band
 
winner
On The Road

Count Basie, artist.

Best Instrumental Arrangement
 
winner
Quincy Jones, GRAMMY winner
Dinorah, Dinorah

Jerry Hey & Quincy Jones, arrangers.

Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)
 
winner
Sailing

Christopher Cross & Michael Omartian, arrangers.

Best Arrangement For Voices
 
winner
Birdland

Janis Siegel, arranger.

Best Album Package
 
winner
Against The Wind

Roy Kohara, art director.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Trilogy: Past, Present And Future

David McClintick, album notes writer.

Best Historical Reissue Album
 
winner
Segovia - The EMI Recordings 1927-39

Keith Hardwick, producer.

Best Engineered Recording - Non-Classical
 
winner
The Wall

James Guthrie, engineer.

Producer Of The Year (Non-Classical)
 
winner
Phil Ramone
Best Classical Album
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Berg: Lulu (Complete Version)

Pierre Boulez, artist. Gunther Breest & Michael Horwath, producers.

Best Classical Orchestral Recording
 
winner
Georg Solti, GRAMMY winner
Bruckner: Symphony No. 6 In A

Georg Solti, conductor. Raymond Minshull, producer.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Pierre Boulez, GRAMMY winner
Berg: Lulu (Complete Version)

Pierre Boulez, conductor. Gunther Breest & Michael Horwath, producers.

Best Choral Performance, Classical (Other Than Opera)
 
winner
Mozart: Requiem

Norbert Balatsch, chorus master. Carlo Maria Giulini, conductor.

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Play Music For Two Violins (Moszkowski: Suite For Two Violins/Shostakovich: Duets/Prokofiev: Sonata For Two Violins)

Itzhak Perlman & Pinchas Zukerman, artists.

Best Classical Performance- Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Berg: Violin Concerto/Stravinsky: Violin Concerto In D

Itzhak Perlman, artist. (TIE)

Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist OR Soloists (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Brahms: Violin And Cello Concerto In A Minor (Double Concerto)

Itzhak Perlman & Mstislav Rostropovich, artists. (TIE)

Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
The Spanish Album

Itzhak Perlman, artist.

Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
 
winner
Prima Donna, Vol. 5 - Great Soprano Arias From Handel To Britten

Leontyne Price, artist.

Best Engineered Recording, Classical
 
winner
Berg: Lulu (Complete Version)

Karl-August Naegler, engineer.

Classical Producer Of The Year
 
winner
Robert Woods, GRAMMY winner
Robert Woods