Winners

14th Annual GRAMMY Awards (1971)

The ’70s would prove, among many other things, the era of the sensitive singer/songwriter, and being a great one would prove a rewarding experience at the 14th Annual GRAMMY Awards held at New York’s Felt Forum (now The Theater at Madison Square Garden). Broadcast live on ABC for the second year, and hosted again by Andy Williams, the GRAMMY Awards were dominated by a woman who was on the opposite coast with a newborn child—Carole King, who won Record Of The Year (“It’s Too Late”), Album Of The Year (Tapestry), Song Of The Year (“You’ve Got A Friend”) and Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female (Tapestry). And as if that wasn’t impressive enough, King’s “You’ve Got A Friend” also helped her friend James Taylor win Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male, while Quincy Jones won Best Pop Instrumental Performance for Smackwater Jack, named after another great song King co-wrote with early Brill Building partner and former husband Gerry Goffin.

Andy Williams started the show off by mentioning some records that were not nominated, including “Joy To The World” by Archie Bunker of “All In The Family” fame (the groundbreaking sitcom about a lovable bigot had launched in 1971), “I Am...I Said” by Richard Nixon (the Watergate scandal was just beginning to break), and “Shaft” as recorded by the James Frey of his day, Clifford Irving (Irving had published a faux “authorized” biography of recluse Howard Hughes).

Then in a nod to the show being held in such close proximity to the Great White Way, Williams introduced the cast of Godspell to perform an uplifting medley of two songs from the show: “Prepare Ye The Way Of The Lord” and “Day By Day.” In a noteworthy time capsule moment, Anthony Newley and the most musical Brady of all, Florence Henderson, presented the award for Best Score From An Original Cast Show Album, which Godspell composer Stephen Schwartz accepted in what looked very much like a denim tux.

The now late great Janis Joplin was rightly nominated for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female, alongside Aretha Franklin, Diana Ross, Freda Payne and Jean Knight, with the Queen of Soul winning out for her stirring rendition of “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” The 5th Dimension did one of their entertaining singing presentations of the nominees, ultimately handing out the Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Duo Or Group award to the Carpenters for their self-titled 1971 album, which, in a Beatlesesque nod, became known to fans as “the tan album.”

More surprising was the usually stone-faced TV legend Ed Sullivan appearing to present the GRAMMY for Best Comedy Recording and getting a few laughs at his own expense. “I think it’s safe to say that after 23 years on television my comedy talent wasn’t obvious to anyone,” Sullivan joked. A shot of nominees Cheech & Chong in the audience in full freak regalia makes one wish they had won so that there could be a shot of them and Sullivan embracing, but the award went instead to the great Lily Tomlin (This Is A Recording) who, like a several among the night’s winners, was not present to accept. Leonard Bernstein was there to pick up a special award, but explained he had a reason to leave early. “I could go on also interminably except that I have to rush back to my television set to see West Side Story on the other channel,” Bernstein explained. “Don’t you turn that dial,” host Williams then warned with a smile after Bernstein had exited.

The night offered other pleasant surprises, including a characteristically fine performance by the Bill Evans Trio. Evans didn’t smile as he played, but broke into a grin after winning the GRAMMY for Best Jazz Performance By A Group for The Bill Evans Album—one of his two awards for the night. Williams offered a preview of the upcoming film of The Concert For Bangladesh, and later presented a Trustees Award to an absent Beatles, explaining, “They were a revelation and a revolution.”

But sometimes such absences were charming. When King won her third award for the night for Record Of The Year, Herb Alpert—presenting with Karen and Richard Carpenter—smiled and said, “Well, she had triplets.”

Record Of The Year
 
winner
Carole King, GRAMMY winner
It's Too Late

Carole King, artist. Lou Adler, producer.

Album Of The Year
 
winner
Carole King, GRAMMY winner
Tapestry

Carole King, artist. Lou Adler, producer.

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Carole King, GRAMMY winner
You've Got A Friend

Carole King, songwriter.

Best New Artist Of The Year
 
winner
Carly Simon
Best Instrumental Arrangement
 
winner
Theme From Shaft

Isaac Hayes & Johnny Allen, arrangers.

Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)
 
winner
Paul McCartney, GRAMMY winner
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

Paul McCartney, arranger.

Best Engineered Recording - Non-Classical
 
winner
Theme From Shaft

Dave Purple, Henry Bush & Ron Capone, engineers.

Best Album Cover
 
winner
Pollution

Dean O. Torrence, art director. Gene Brownell, photographer.

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Sam, Hard And Heavy

Sam Samudio, album notes writer.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Carole King, GRAMMY winner
Tapestry

Carole King, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
You've Got A Friend

James Taylor, artist.

Best Pop Vocal Performance By A Duo Or Group
 
winner
Carpenters

Carpenters (Karen Carpenter, Richard Carpenter), artist.

Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Quincy Jones, GRAMMY winner
Smackwater Jack

Quincy Jones, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Bridge Over Troubled Water

Aretha Franklin, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
A Natural Man

Lou Rawls, artist.

Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Group
 
winner
Proud Mary

Ike & Tina Turner (Ike Turner, Tina Turner), artist.

Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
Ain't No Sunshine

Bill Withers, songwriter.

Best Soul Gospel Performance
 
winner
Shirley Caesar, GRAMMY winner
Put Your Hand In The Hand Of The Man From Galilee

Shirley Caesar, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Female
 
winner
Help Me Make It Through The Night

Sammi Smith, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance, Male
 
winner
When You're Hot, You're Hot

Jerry Reed, artist.

Best Country Vocal Performance By A Duo Or Group
 
winner
Loretta Lynn, GRAMMY winner
After The Fire Is Gone

Conway Twitty & Loretta Lynn, artists.

Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Snowbird

Chet Atkins, artist.

Best Country Song
 
winner
Help Me Make It Through The Night

Kris Kristofferson, songwriter.

Best Sacred Performance
 
winner
Did You Think To Pray

Charley Pride, artist.

Best Gospel Performance (Other Than Soul Gospel)
 
winner
Let Me Live

Charley Pride, artist.

Best Ethnic Or Traditional Recording
 
winner
They Call Me Muddy Waters

Muddy Waters, artist.

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
Theme From Summer Of '42

Michel Legrand, composer.

Best Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special
 
winner
Shaft

Isaac Hayes, composer.

Best Score From An Original Cast Show Album
 
winner
Godspell

Stephen Schwartz, composer. Stephen Schwartz, producer.

Best Recording For Children
 
winner
Bill Cosby Talks To Kids About Drugs

Bill Cosby, artist.

Best Comedy Recording
 
winner
This Is A Recording

Lily Tomlin, artist.

Best Spoken Word Recording
 
winner
Desiderata

Les Crane, narrator.

Best Jazz Performance By A Soloist
 
winner
The Bill Evans Album

Bill Evans, soloist.

Best Jazz Performance By A Group
 
winner
The Bill Evans Album

Bill Evans, artist.

Best Jazz Performance By A Big Band
 
winner
Duke Ellington, GRAMMY winner
New Orleans Suite

Duke Ellington, artist.

Album Of The Year, Classical
 
winner
Vladimir Horowitz, GRAMMY winner
Horowitz Plays Rachmaninoff (Etudes-Tableaux Piano Music; Sonatas)

Vladimir Horowitz, artist. Richard Killough & Thomas Frost, producers.

Best Classical Performance - Orchestra
 
winner
Mahler: Symphony No. 1 In D

Carlo Maria Giulini, artist.

Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Villa-Lobos: Concerto For Guitar

Julian Bream, artist.

Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist Or Soloists (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
Vladimir Horowitz, GRAMMY winner
Horowitz Plays Rachmaninoff (Etudes-Tableaux Piano Music; Sonatas)
Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Debussy: Quartet In G Minor/Ravel: Quartet In F

Juilliard String Quartet (Claus Adam, Earl Carlyss, Robert Mann, Samuel Rhodes), artist.

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Verdi: Aida

Erich Leinsdorf, artist. Richard Mohr, producer.

Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance
 
winner
Leontyne Price Sings Robert Schumann

Leontyne Price, artist.

Best Choral Performance - Classical
 
winner
Berlioz: Requiem

Colin Davis, artist. Arthur Oldham & Russell Burgess, choir directors.

Best Engineered Recording, Classical
 
winner
Berlioz: Requiem

Vittorio Negri, engineer.