Better Believe It

EMF is unbelievable in this week's Forgotten Video
  • EMF in "Unbelievable"
August 26, 2010 -- 8:00 am PDT
GRAMMY.com

Welcome to Forgotten Videos. Well, for some forgotten, for others just filed away, and for others still, a totally brand-new discovery. Whichever category you fall into, each week we'll feature a video that's possibly been collecting dust when what it really deserves is a fresh look. Or, we'll be giving a fresh look at a video that deserves to be collecting dust. We're not here to judge, we just want to take you on a little trip down memory lane. Yep, you'll remember when hair was really that big, when drums were that up front in the mix, when video was young(er) and so were you.

EMF
"Unbelievable"
1991

This British dance-rock quintet from Cinderford, England, which formed in 1989 as part of what was known as the Manchester rave scene, made an unbelievable debut with this hit single reaching the top of the Billboard Hot 100 in 1991. The band, vocalist James Atkin, keyboardist Derry Brownson, drummer Mark De Cloedt, guitarist Ian Dench, and bassist Zach Foley, played their first gig just two months after forming and it was a Casio sampler and sequencer picked up in a local thrift shop that added the dance vibe to their rock-oriented sound. Their initials are said to stand for Epsom Mad Funkers, named after a New Order fan club. Apparently, EMF fans thought it stood for something else (Ecstacy Mind F***ers). Yoko Ono had a few thoughts of her own when she objected to the band's use of a voice sample of John Lennon's murderer Mark David Chapman on another track off the Schubert Dip album. The sound bite was later removed from future pressings.

The video finds the band performing live at what was actually a free concert held in order to get performance shots from a live crowd full of colorful attire, sideways hats and high-energy dance moves. But the high energy faded as EMF eventually called it quits after releasing their EP Unexplained and two more full-length efforts Stigma (1992), and Cha Cha Cha (1995), to no avail.

 Got an unbelievable Forgotten Video recommendation? Leave us a comment.

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