The 53rd GRAMMYs Rocked

  • The Black Keys
    Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic.com
  • Jeff Beck
    Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic.com
  • Neil Young
    Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic.com

 (For a complete list of 53rd GRAMMY Awards winners, click here.)

My second year as the rock community blogger for GRAMMY.com proved to be another exciting adventure surrounding Music's Biggest Night. From the Social Media Rock Stars Summit and the Pre-GRAMMY Gala to the Pre-Telecast Ceremony, 53rd Annual GRAMMY Awards and GRAMMY Celebration after-party, I was there live tweeting, instagraming, Facebooking, and reporting my journey on my website for all things rock-related.

The rock genre was celebrated early in the Pre-Telecast. The first memorable award for me was when the Doors' documentary When You're Strange won for Best Long Form Music Video. Robby Krieger was there to accept the award. Then, the White Stripes' Under Great White Northern Lights won for Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package.

In the Rock Field, the legendary Paul McCartney won for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance for his live version of the Beatles' "Helter Skelter." The Black Keys won for Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocals for "Tighten Up," adding to their win for Best Alternative Music Album for Brothers.

My fellow bloggers laughed at my excited squeal for the Best Hard Rock Performance category. I was quite surprised when the award went to Them Crooked Vultures' "New Fang" — the newest act of the bunch; granted, they are a supergroup containing members of Queens Of The Stone Age, Foo Fighters and Led Zeppelin.

The Best Metal Performance award went to Iron Maiden's "El Dorado," honoring another classic act like last year's winner, Judas Priest. It was Maiden's first GRAMMY, as last year was Priest's first. I happened to look over at another group who seemed to be making noise during the announcement of the award, and sitting only one section over was Slayer's Tom Araya and family.

The Best Rock Instrumental Performance went to Jeff Beck for "Hammerhead." Beck ran right by me to accept his award, wearing jeans, boots and a leather jacket, and his speech included one of my favorite quotes: "This just proves that if you keep going, you might get there."

The Best Rock Song trophy went to Neil Young's "Angry World." Young's Le Noise, produced by Daniel Lanois, was one of my favorite albums of the year. Young was there to accept the statue, and he talked about how this was his first music GRAMMY. Last year, Young took home his first GRAMMY ever for art direction for Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package for Neil Young Archives Vol. 1 (1963-1972).

On to the GRAMMY telecast, I was excited to see Muse perform. I was able to watch Muse rehearse for their performance, so I knew what to expect. Being able to watch rehearsals is one of the ultimate perks of being a GRAMMY.com community blogger. When the people around me started nervously asking about the people infiltrating the stage, I knew it was part of the act. Muse also gave us the first bit of pyrotechnics of the evening. (The rest of the evening featured fiery performances from Justin Bieber and Rihanna and Drake.)

I was happy to see Muse take home Best Rock Album for The Resistance. Arcade First closed out the show with a performance of "Month Of May" (and an encore featuring "Ready To Start"), and were awarded with the night's highest honor — Album Of The Year for The Suburbs.

My GRAMMY adventure wrapped up at the official after-party, where I watched the Roots perform some great rock covers such as Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O' Mine." It was another stellar year for the community blogger team, and I left already dreaming of what would be in store for me next year!
 

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