George Harrison

George Harrison

Past GRAMMY Awards

2003 - 46th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Best Pop Instrumental Performance

Winner

Marwa Blues

1996 - 39th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal

Winner

Free As A Bird

Best Music Video, Long Form

Winner

The Beatles Anthology

Best Music Video, Short Form

Winner

Free As A Bird

1989 - 32nd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal

Winner

Traveling Wilburys Volume One

1972 - 15th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Album Of The Year

Winner

The Concert For Bangla Desh

1970 - 13th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Best Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special

Winner

Let It Be

1967 - 10th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Album Of The Year

Winner

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

Best Contemporary Album

Winner

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

1964 - 7th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Best New Artist Of 1964

Winner

Best Performance By A Vocal Group

Winner

A Hard Day's Night

George Harrison will forever be known as the lead guitarist, and in some ways the spiritual core, of the Beatles, but he also had a fruitful solo career. While Harrison helped stretch the Beatles' musical boundaries into areas of experimentation — including employing Eastern instrumentation such as sitar, borne from his friendship with Indian sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar — he also wrote some of the more beautiful and memorable songs in their canon, including gems such as "Something," "Here Comes The Sun" and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps."

After the Beatles broke up in 1970, it didn't take long for Harrison to release his first post-Fab Four solo effort, All Things Must Pass. Released as a triple album, the set exposed all of Harrison's varied influences, musical and spiritual, and put him solidly on the map as a solo artist, reaching No. 1 and featuring the No. 1 hit "My Sweet Lord."

On Aug. 1 1971, Harrison teamed with artists including Shankar, Leon Russell, Bob Dylan, and Eric Clapton for the Concert for Bangladesh. As the first major humanitarian benefit of its kind, the concert raised more than $15 million for refugees from East Pakistan for relief from the 1970 Bhola cyclone and the Bangladesh Liberation War. The concert spawned a triple-disc live album, which earned Album Of The Year honors at the 15th Annual GRAMMY Awards. Released in 1973, Living In The Material World became Harrison's second chart-topping solo album.

Harrison entered the film industry in 1978, co-founding Handmade Films, which produced work by the now-classic Monty Python comedy troupe. Harrison hit big again on the charts in 1987 with Cloud Nine, taking his cover of James Ray's "Got My Mind Set On You" to No. 1. In 1988 he joined the Traveling Wilburys, one of rock's supreme super groups, with Dylan, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne. The all-stars took home Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal for their album Traveling Wilburys Volume One at the 32nd Annual GRAMMY Awards.

In the late '90s Harrison had a bout with throat cancer, and in 2001 he began radiotherapy for lung cancer that had spread to his brain. He died Nov. 29, 2001. Brainwashed, his final studio album, was released in 2002. The album contained "Marwa Blues," a song that earned Harrison a posthumous GRAMMY in 2003 for Best Pop Instrumental Performance.

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